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I will be the new owner of a 2006 BMW K1200 LT this week. Yahoo !!!!

Question... I have been told several ways to break in a new K motor. I would like to know how other people were told to break in a new bike.

Next, this bike was wired for the Motorrad BMW Navigator II on top of the tank. This unit is to pricy for me $1300.00. Do you know if any other GPS units will work in its place? Your info is very much appreciated.
 

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Just do what the book says, various RPM ranges up to about 4500. Don't drone along at fixed RPM if you can avoid it.

The Best thing you can do is full throttle, low RPM blasts up the longest hills you can find. If you can find a hill long enough, pull hard in 5th gear from about 2500 RPM up to 4500, let it cool down a little, and do it again, and again. I have hills around my home which are steep enough that I can hold full throttle for quite some time, and never go over 4500.

Ring seating needs high cylinder pressure to force the rings out against the cylinder walls, but you do not want high RPM which can cause glazing.

The WORST thing you can do is "baby" it with low throttle, slow accelerations. Get on it often, just don't over-rev it. Just remember that during the break in period, your two enemies are low throttle and high RPM.

Make sure you cange the oil at 600 miles, or even a little sooner. That gets any metal "swarf" from manufacturing out of the engine, along with the initially scrubbed off "high points" in the cylinder/piston interfaces.
 

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dshealey said:
Just do what the book says, various RPM ranges up to about 4500. Don't drone along at fixed RPM if you can avoid it.

The Best thing you can do is full throttle, low RPM blasts up the longest hills you can find. If you can find a hill long enough, pull hard in 5th gear from about 2500 RPM up to 4500, let it cool down a little, and do it again, and again. I have hills around my home which are steep enough that I can hold full throttle for quite some time, and never go over 4500.

Ring seating needs high cylinder pressure to force the rings out against the cylinder walls, but you do not want high RPM which can cause glazing.

The WORST thing you can do is "baby" it with low throttle, slow accelerations. Get on it often, just don't over-rev it. Just remember that during the break in period, your two enemies are low throttle and high RPM.

Make sure you cange the oil at 600 miles, or even a little sooner. That gets any metal "swarf" from manufacturing out of the engine, along with the initially scrubbed off "high points" in the cylinder/piston interfaces.
This needs to be added the FAQ, New Owner section.
 

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I have read all the posts and websites on this topic, until I was blue in the face. The one website that I am most impressed with is THIS ONE. I like it because it is based on true bench testing and experience...rather than theories and generalizations. I fully intend on using MotoMan's break-in techniques on every brand-new bike that I buy from now on.
 

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messenger13 said:
I have read all the posts and websites on this topic, until I was blue in the face. The one website that I am most impressed with is THIS ONE. I like it because it is based on true bench testing and experience...rather than theories and generalizations. I fully intend on using MotoMan's break-in techniques on every brand-new bike that I buy from now on.
I have read that site before, and it just supported other readings I have had over the years. I have based my break ins mostly on the recommendations of Lycoming and Continental for their air cooled aircraft engines. You sure don't baby those! They both recommend running at least 75% power as much as possible for the first several hours. Pretty easy to do on aircraft engines, as you almost always use 100% for take off and climb out, and normally rarely less than 60% in cruise. Easy to bump up your cruise speed to run a continuous 75% power.

That is very hard to do on land vehicles though. You can only do it in spurts, and try to keep your deceleration/low throttle running times to be as short as possible.
 

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motoman breakin

found the motoman site just before I purchased my 04 R1200CL that replaced the 03 R1200 CLC. While I did not baby the 03 during the early days ( I rode it like I stole it) but not to the suggestion on motoman's site. the 03 often would smoke during startup. My neighbor who followed to the letter the breakin style for his 03 CLC in the ops. book. His bike smokes on every start up. he has 2800 mi. My 04 was broke in much more aggresively and never had a smoking problem on startup. when BMW traded the CL for my 05 LT I also broke it in aggressively and no smoking as yet with 3450 mi.

not recket science but the no smoking seems to sort of speak for itself. IMHO
 
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