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Friend has 2006 k1200lt, 11K miles, has sit in garage for years, he said he would start it up once in awhile.. Says won't start now. He's now thinking that fuel pump & fuel filter & hose is all bad.. I say to look at other things before doing all that work.. I know fuel injection on older GM DIESEL engines, but not on BMW gas injection. What about spraying starting fluid in air intake to see if it fireies up at all??? Can't use that on Diesels... He has fuel in tank ( he says had stable in it) I don't think it could get air in injector line, could it??? How or what to check ,, to check for fuel pump?? I haven't looked at it yet..Then he has a Yamaha not running too.. I think that would be easier to get that running than the BMW.. Any help would be appreciated... My LT was picked up friday for the copart.com auction.. Haven't got the insurance check yet. coolken
 

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Well starting it up once in a while is the worst thing you can do unless you run the bike up to full temperature for 30 minutes or more (by driving not just idling). First off when you say it does not start do you mean it cranks but does not fire? If yes, then I say you are correct to suspect the lines in the tank and you can check that by looking in the tank with the key on and cycle the kill switch. The pump will run for a few seconds and if you see fuel moving around you have a busted hose. Air does not usually get into the fuel lines like a diesel but if there is not 50 psi the injectors can't push a fuel pattern for ignition. I would look there first, but yes you can spray starter fluid in the intake (just don't get carried away) to see if it fires. But do that only is the fuel swirling test passes.

If you mean it does not crank then that is usually a low battery as the starter relay has a circuit to prevent low battery starts.
 
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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the the reply.. He said it cranks, he put a new battery in . I have been reading other Posts & I see a lot of other things to check. It will be some time before I look at this Lt.. The owner might get to some of the problems before I see it... Thanks,,, coolken
 

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The most common cause of no start in an LT is the fuel lines in the tank or in the case of one that sat, bad fuel.
 

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Well starting it up once in a while is the worst thing you can do unless you run the bike up to full temperature for 30 minutes or more (by driving not just idling). First off when you say it does not start do you mean it cranks but does not fire? If yes, then I say you are correct to suspect the lines in the tank and you can check that by looking in the tank with the key on and cycle the kill switch. The pump will run for a few seconds and if you see fuel moving around you have a busted hose. Air does not usually get into the fuel lines like a diesel but if there is not 50 psi the injectors can't push a fuel pattern for ignition. I would look there first, but yes you can spray starter fluid in the intake (just don't get carried away) to see if it fires. But do that only is the fuel swirling test passes.

If you mean it does not crank then that is usually a low battery as the starter relay has a circuit to prevent low battery starts.
John - can you expand on your comment about periodic starting being the worst thing that you could do? I thought that if one were to start the bike up weekly and let it come up to temp, it would be beneficial.
 

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John - can you expand on your comment about periodic starting being the worst thing that you could do? I thought that if one were to start the bike up weekly and let it come up to temp, it would be beneficial.
It was explained to me that if you do that it can lead to a lot of condensation that never really gets a chance to burn off and this can be bad for the engine.
 

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It needs to be at temp for 30 minutes or more to make that effective as just the coolant at temp does not relate to the oil at temp which is the leading factor.
 

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It needs to be at temp for 30 minutes or more to make that effective as just the coolant at temp does not relate to the oil at temp which is the leading factor.
John - Waz
The reason for my question about starting the bike periodically (weekly for me) is that there is not a lot of riding time, when the temps get into the low 30s. I've been putting it up on the center stand, then bring it up to its normal operating temp. I do check the exhaust to make sure that the water vapor is gone and put it in 1st and back to N several times. The whole process takes about 20 minutes +. Somehow, letting it sit all winter seems to be asking for trouble. Opinions?
 

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John - Waz
The reason for my question about starting the bike periodically (weekly for me) is that there is not a lot of riding time, when the temps get into the low 30s. I've been putting it up on the center stand, then bring it up to its normal operating temp. I do check the exhaust to make sure that the water vapor is gone and put it in 1st and back to N several times. The whole process takes about 20 minutes +. Somehow, letting it sit all winter seems to be asking for trouble. Opinions?
Yes I understand what you are saying and I have also been one to periodically start my bike but I don't do it quite as much as I used to after a friend who is a motorcycle mechanic told me that it wasn't a good idea. Of course the other thing to keep in mind is that if you do start your bike a lot and not ride it then you are also not charging your battery unless it's kept on a tender.
 

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I guess my question would be - why does someone think they need to start their bike and not ride it? I've been riding since my Dad started teaching me about motorcycles on his sidecar rig in 1956 - I was 10. As I grew old enough - and tall enough to get my own bike - it was a 1940's belt drive Simplex Servi-Cycle :) - he finally caught me just starting it up and not riding it [restricted license - to and from school] and gave me hell for it. Told me a list of reasons not to do that, one of which was condensation doesn't burn off.

Told me the bike will be just fine until I had time to ride it a reasonable distance. I've had a couple bikes since then.

I did a Nam long tour and two long tours in Germany. When I left the US, I did oil changes, rode the bikes to full warm-up, drained the tanks, ran them until they died, then left them on trickle chargers. When I got back to the bikes, they all started with just fuel and never had a problem. I'm now down to two RT's. The only time they get started, is when they're taking me for a ride.

Don't start them and let them sit - ride them or don't start them.

Obviously your opinion may vary - and that's fine..;)
 

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John - Waz
The reason for my question about starting the bike periodically (weekly for me) is that there is not a lot of riding time, when the temps get into the low 30s. I've been putting it up on the center stand, then bring it up to its normal operating temp. I do check the exhaust to make sure that the water vapor is gone and put it in 1st and back to N several times. The whole process takes about 20 minutes +. Somehow, letting it sit all winter seems to be asking for trouble. Opinions?
Then I'll ask you why you think it is necessary to start the bike and introduce moisture to the crankcase that will turn to acid in the sump when the bike is perfectly fine to sit for extended periods ( months) with no harm. Also since you are not running in airflow there are sections of the engine and exhaust that can over heat without that air flow. There was a GS that a guy started then let idle for 20 minutes and he came back out to a melted exhaust.

I have stored bikes for deployments of 11 months and 8 months and they had cast iron inserts so I sprayed oil in the cylinder and removed the battery. Returned and installed the battery (had been of a floater) kick it over and fired right up. I mean after all the bike doesn't have a concept of time and it does not care if it sits for long periods as long as the oil is fresh.
 

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Then I'll ask you why you think it is necessary to start the bike and introduce moisture to the crankcase that will turn to acid in the sump when the bike is perfectly fine to sit for extended periods ( months) with no harm. Also since you are not running in airflow there are sections of the engine and exhaust that can over heat without that air flow. There was a GS that a guy started then let idle for 20 minutes and he came back out to a melted exhaust.

I have stored bikes for deployments of 11 months and 8 months and they had cast iron inserts so I sprayed oil in the cylinder and removed the battery. Returned and installed the battery (had been of a floater) kick it over and fired right up. I mean after all the bike doesn't have a concept of time and it does not care if it sits for long periods as long as the oil is fresh.
John - Waz
Thanks for the info. This helps a lot. Since the bike lives on a battery tender, I'll just let it sit, until the weather warms up.

Regards
Rick
 

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John - Waz
The reason for my question about starting the bike periodically (weekly for me) is that there is not a lot of riding time, when the temps get into the low 30s. I've been putting it up on the center stand, then bring it up to its normal operating temp. I do check the exhaust to make sure that the water vapor is gone and put it in 1st and back to N several times. The whole process takes about 20 minutes +. Somehow, letting it sit all winter seems to be asking for trouble. Opinions?
Mine sits 3-4 months each winter here in northern PA. I treat with Stabil and will the tank to minimize condensation space. I connect a battery maintainer and it generally fires right up in the spring with no problem. Running an engine a short time without getting fully warm is bad for two reasons: 1. It introduces more combustion byproducts into the crankcase where it can form acids in the oil, 2. The heat pushes drier air out of the crankcase (since its moisture has already condensed out) and then when it cools, it sucks in a fresh batch of ambient air and moisture to condense in the crankcase.
 

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So I shouldn't crank my Onan gas generator once a month for one hour, as per the owners manual instructions?
 

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So I shouldn't crank my Onan gas generator once a month for one hour, as per the owners manual instructions?
The primary reason generators exercise themselves (at least the larger ones), is to ensure everything is in working order should the power fail. It is far more of a readiness test than a extend the life of the engine action. It probably shortens the life, but then most emergency generators never see even 500 hours of actual use so it matters little.
 
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So I shouldn't crank my Onan gas generator once a month for one hour, as per the owners manual instructions?
That's more to keep the slip rings in good condition, when I bought my motor home the generator had not run for at least one year, voltage and 60 cycle were high but after a couple of hours unloaded volts and 60 cycle in normal range, got lucky, did not have to manually clean slip rings. Once a month probably more than really needed.
 

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So I shouldn't crank my Onan gas generator once a month for one hour, as per the owners manual instructions?
That generator does not roll down the road for cooling as it has its own air flow, not the same with a vehicle. Now if you want to start your bike and roll down the road for an hour I say go for it.
 

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That generator does not roll down the road for cooling as it has its own air flow, not the same with a vehicle. Now if you want to start your bike and roll down the road for an hour I say go for it.
Or if you want to sit on your generator and pretend it's a Harley well that would probably work also.
 

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Or if you want to sit on your generator and pretend it's a Harley well that would probably work also.
Wazza -
That's the best comment I've read in a while. I can tell you, since I live in Harley country, that my genset sounds exactly like a Road King. So, I'm thinking I should go down to the local Harley dealer to see if I can find some accessories that would go on the genney! Maybe a set of saddle bags for the sides, some Harley decals, and a set of high rise handle bars for the access lid. It would be a hoot!
 

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Wazza -
That's the best comment I've read in a while. I can tell you, since I live in Harley country, that my genset sounds exactly like a Road King. So, I'm thinking I should go down to the local Harley dealer to see if I can find some accessories that would go on the genney! Maybe a set of saddle bags for the sides, some Harley decals, and a set of high rise handle bars for the access lid. It would be a hoot!
Well if you do pleas post pictures. And when you sit on it make sure you aren't wearing any protective gear.;)(y)
 
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