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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Howdy,

I'm on the fence on a dedicated GPS for x-country touring versus my iPhone 5 for music/GPS using GoogleMaps w/voice guided nav prompts. I know about the wonder wheel control that will come w/ Nav V on a new RTW which is OTW now, but between complaints of glare in the RTW mounting location which otherwise looks to be ideally located, and wondering what Nav V will add from a practical perspective--i.e., what people actually DO with all of that technology--it does make me wonder if people find it a ultimately useful enough to justify the high cost--as much as a new iPhone for example.

Thanks in advance for your experience and opinion.
 

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The tie breaker may be the lack of cellular service in some areas, hence making your iPhone useless for your purpose.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The tie breaker may be the lack of cellular service in some areas, hence making your iPhone useless for your purpose.
OK I remember now. With GoogleMaps you would have to preload maps to get its GPS chip to work w/o cell service, but that's a bit of hassle depending on how big maps you can preload would be. Thanks.
 

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Howdy,

I'm on the fence on a dedicated GPS for x-country touring versus my iPhone 5 for music/GPS using GoogleMaps w/voice guided nav prompts. I know about the wonder wheel control that will come w/ Nav V on a new RTW which is OTW now, but between complaints of glare in the RTW mounting location which otherwise looks to be ideally located, and wondering what Nav V will add from a practical perspective--i.e., what people actually DO with all of that technology--it does make me wonder if people find it a ultimately useful enough to justify the high cost--as much as a new iPhone for example.

Thanks in advance for your experience and opinion.
Cons of iPhone: Needs the charging cable if you are going to use it x-country. Not all that easy to see in daylight conditions. Screen may go to sleep, necessitating a tap with conductive gloves. Still need to mount it on the bike. Will not give you motorcycle routing, only fastest or shortest routes using Google algorithms.
Pros of Nav5: Very flexible routing using Basecamp. Reasonably easy to see unless the bright sun is between 4 and 8 o'clock. Integrates with the iPhone for phone calls and shows caller ID. Garmin iPhone App gives traffic information, great weather information, local restaurant, gas station and lodging info for every exit or off-ramp.
If you are seriously going to do a x-country trip, having the Nav5 conveniently located on the dash seems to me to be a no-brainer.
There are multiple other advantages of using the Nav5, and you should take a look at the user manual and reviews on this and other MC forums.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
If you are seriously going to do a x-country trip, having the Nav5 conveniently located on the dash seems to me to be a no-brainer.
Ouch, severe arm pain from the twisting! Nav V it be!

Ed, my riding partner brother who just got introduced to GPS on an MC (390LM) is using Basecamp to map out many potential routes along a basic master route. How hard is to do basic routes directly into Nav V w/o relying on Basecamp? I ask because beyond Golden CO, we hope to be deciding the next day's route in the evening time the day before based on a bunch of factors, in which case we won't have a computer to work with to use Basecamp.
 

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Ouch, severe arm pain from the twisting! Nav V it be!

Ed, my riding partner brother who just got introduced to GPS on an MC (390LM) is using Basecamp to map out many potential routes along a basic master route. How hard is to do basic routes directly into Nav V w/o relying on Basecamp? I ask because beyond Golden CO, we hope to be deciding the next day's route in the evening time the day before based on a bunch of factors, in which case we won't have a computer to work with to use Basecamp.
It is easy to do basic point-to-point routing and let the Garmin do all the work according to its internal algorithm You just set up your basic preferences in the settings, such as avoid tolls, ferries, unpaved roads. You can also set calculation modes such as fastest route, shortest route, curvy roads. This will get you to where you want to go. If you are going to plan next days route the night before, the best way to do it is to pre-plan using a good map of tne area.
Have a good trip.
 
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Ouch, severe arm pain from the twisting! Nav V it be!

Ed, my riding partner brother who just got introduced to GPS on an MC (390LM) is using Basecamp to map out many potential routes along a basic master route. How hard is to do basic routes directly into Nav V w/o relying on Basecamp? I ask because beyond Golden CO, we hope to be deciding the next day's route in the evening time the day before based on a bunch of factors, in which case we won't have a computer to work with to use Basecamp.
I forgot to mention Butler motorcycle maps for daily trip planning. They cost about$15/map and are designed exclusively for motorcycle trip planning. They cover most of the Western states and are slowly moving Eastward.
Motorcycle Maps & Motorcycle Routes | Butlermaps.com
 

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