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Discussion Starter #1
Alright folks, I recently bought a 2001 K1200LT from a dealership that took the bike in as a trade in. She has 20,070 miles and I paid $3200. The bike is in great shape but rides fairly smooth. There are no service records as they were done by the owner and there is a limited number of shops in Springfield, IL, that are available.

The question I am asking the esteemed panel is this: which regular maintenance work to I begin with?

Oil change (which was done 200 miles ago)
Brake fluid, new lines, bleeders, pads
Coolant
Gear fluid
Tires (which are hard as a rock but they are 880's)
Anything I am missing?

Thanks for sharing all your knowledge!
 

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Alright folks, I recently bought a 2001 K1200LT from a dealership that took the bike in as a trade in. She has 20,070 miles and I paid $3200. The bike is in great shape but rides fairly smooth. There are no service records as they were done by the owner and there is a limited number of shops in Springfield, IL, that are available.

The question I am asking the esteemed panel is this: which regular maintenance work to I begin with?

Oil change (which was done 200 miles ago)
Brake fluid, new lines, bleeders, pads
Coolant
Gear fluid
Tires (which are hard as a rock but they are 880's)
Anything I am missing?

Thanks for sharing all your knowledge!
Drill the weep hole in the bell housing.

When you do the FD oil, pay very close attention to the magnet and what is on it. If it is really really clean, then it was likely just changed and wiped so you have no idea on the condition of that FD. You will have to ride it some in that case and then check it again after a couple thousand miles.

Check for bearing play in the rear which could be FD crown bearing wear or swing arm pivot bearing wear.

Grab a good flashlight and shine it up on top of the engine from over the front wheel and look for oil on the top of the engine and the condition of the breather tube.

Check to see if the canisterektomy has been done.

Your 01 likely has the old black starter relay that can fuse if the battery gets low and you try and start it. Without pulling it apart, your only indication would be a sticker on one of the wires of the diagnostic plug under the seat, IF someone took the time to add the sticker while swapping the relay. It says ANLASSERMODUL. You should pull the cover off the electrics box and inspect when you do the air filter so you know what you have. Get a battery tender and leave it on it when not riding.

Not having a service history, same as me and my 01 is a crap shoot. I just went ahead and dealt with all the things that could go wrong and made my own service history/baseline. Lots of work and not cheap but I intend to keep it awhile and didn't want any unexpected trouble. Most will just ride it till it breaks and there is nothing wrong with that unless you are 2k from home :)

Welcome from Sugar Hill GA
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I did perform the canisterectomy just the other day and the battery tender is already installed. I will have to find the weeping hole directions and put that on my list of to do's. I went ahead and bought her as I figured the low mileage would be on my side for service.

Let's hope that is true!
 

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Drill the weep hole in the bell housing.
I just went ahead and dealt with all the things that could go wrong and made my own service history/baseline. Lots of work and not cheap but I intend to keep it awhile and didn't want any unexpected trouble. Most will just ride it till it breaks and there is nothing wrong with that unless you are 2k from home :)

Welcome from Sugar Hill GA

This bike is over-engineered and easily over-maintained. I'm not owning a bike to repair what might go wrong, and spend extra on a possible remedy before it needs it. Yes, I agree that changing fluids, filters, tires and brakes when needed is good. Take care of the battery, too. Lube the shift linkage. The first owner of my '99 installed Spieglers the year I bought it because the originals burst during a fluid flush. She has only 37k on it; I'm not sure if the weep hole has been drilled, or if it has original final drive. Never left me stranded either. If doing all the preventive maintenance is your comfort zone, then by all means, do it. This forum, the videos and advice is worth more to me.
 

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The question I am asking the esteemed panel is this: which regular maintenance work to I begin with?
some more basics...
- Check that the plastic fuel quick-disconnects have been replaced by metal ones (at least the male part) - Beemerboneyard has kits m/f
New CPC Chrome Plated Brass Fuel Line Quick Disconnect Set - Oilheads & K-Bikes
- Maybe look to replace the fuel filter and internal line - known to split
- Check that your pop-off mirrors have been tethered (zip ties, fishing line, just something strong) so if they pop-off when you hit a pothole they don't smash on the ground.
- Change the rubber valves for metal stems, I like the Enke 3/4" from kurveygirl, a bit easier to get air into as well. https://www.kurveygirl.com/shop/product_info.php?products_id=71
 

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An early model Bike with so few miles has probably been sitting for long periods (with old gas in the tank).

I would say, check the QD,s and replace the internal tank hoses right away. (those internal FI hoses will leave you stranded if they split).

When you get your new tires, ensure that the valve stems are replaced also. The stock rubber ones should be fine as long as they are renewed with the tires.

I use shoe laces for mirror tethers.

P.S. The color of your new LT may not be the fastest ..... but it is the Smoothest.
 

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I did perform the canisterectomy just the other day and the battery tender is already installed. I will have to find the weeping hole directions and put that on my list of to do's. I went ahead and bought her as I figured the low mileage would be on my side for service.

Let's hope that is true!
There are 2 weep holes that can be drilled. One for the clutch slave but that requires some disassembly to position correctly and the clutch bellhousing which can be drilled at any time from the underside of the bike. The one I was referring to was the bellhousing as it is easy and may give an early indication of a seal or o-ring leak in the clutch area. If you have to replace the slave or ever remove the swing arm, the weep hole should be drilled for that also at that time.

Age is as much of an enemy as mileage and as already stated, a bike that is rarely ridden, can have related issues.

As for the speed of your color, I have found that with a little practice, you can overcome that limitation and not lose any of the smoothness and still be better looking ;) Just look at me. Judge my speed by my color, and where you should not ! ( takes off his best Yoda voice)
 

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Drill the weep hole in the bell housing.
I just went ahead and dealt with all the things that could go wrong and made my own service history/baseline. Lots of work and not cheap but I intend to keep it awhile and didn't want any unexpected trouble. Most will just ride it till it breaks and there is nothing wrong with that unless you are 2k from home :)

Welcome from Sugar Hill GA

This bike is over-engineered and easily over-maintained. I'm not owning a bike to repair what might go wrong, and spend extra on a possible remedy before it needs it. Yes, I agree that changing fluids, filters, tires and brakes when needed is good. Take care of the battery, too. Lube the shift linkage. The first owner of my '99 installed Spieglers the year I bought it because the originals burst during a fluid flush. She has only 37k on it; I'm not sure if the weep hole has been drilled, or if it has original final drive. Never left me stranded either. If doing all the preventive maintenance is your comfort zone, then by all means, do it. This forum, the videos and advice is worth more to me.


Being over-engineered doesn't mean it doesn't like any other bike line have some issues that can crop up. I like tinkering but I also like reliability so I chose to just hit the things I knew were coming head on and get past them. I am a 4%er and I have a rock hard O-ring I removed. I know where I stand with those issues that don't hit everyone, or at least not at the same time or mileage.

Like I said, riding it till it breaks is a good strategy but I didn't get anything with my bike and had no clue if a anything had ever been serviced on it so I started at one end and when I get to the other, I will let you know. I am getting a lot of riding ( weather permitting) in between though. They are wonderful bikes and I love riding it.

Cheers
 
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I'm more of a "don't fix what isn't broken" kind of guy. I just bought a 1991 K100RS w/ 52k. for a summer bike. As it has been sitting for two years, I replaced all the fluids, greased the stuck steering bearings, and then started riding. I'll tackle the brake lines and a valve check this winter.

I would check all the fluids to see how fresh (clear) they are, check that the manufacture date on the tires is within time and then just ride the thing while it is riding season. Plan on doing Annual Inspection this winter as you get to 25k. I do my services on at 5,000 mile schedule rather than 6,000 as it is easier to keep up with (on 5 vehicles).
 
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Alright folks, I recently bought a 2001 K1200LT from a dealership that took the bike in as a trade in. She has 20,070 miles and I paid $3200... which regular maintenance work to I begin with?...
Congrats on your new bike.

You got a 2001 with 20K miles for $3200?!
That means my 2000 with 98K miles is worth 50 cents. :histerica
I'm keeping it, it is a great bike!
You will enjoy yours.

As with any new bike, I would do a complete "inspection" service. BMW manual calls the 12K interval service "BMW Inspection" as opposed to the 6K interval "Service". Your service manual will list the items but going from memory involves all filters, valve check and adjustment if needed.

Then I suggest you just ride it. If you undertake every suggestion on this site to preemptively "fix" things you'll be wrenching and not riding.

I did a lot of stuff to my 2000 just because I read posts on this board, I'm not sure if they all were needed. You can save a bunch of time and money not fixing things that aren't broken.

Replaced clutch slave preemptively, don't know that I needed to do that. Still have the original clutch slave in my KLT parts bin along with a charcoal cannister and various other things. :)

Drilled the clutch housing weep hole. (Has anyone ever reported that the weep hole saved their clutch?) Although drilling the clutch housing weep hole is pretty quick and easy to do.

I still have the original starter relay; I just keep it on a Battery Tender. If you get a low battery and slow cranking, just don't keep trying, jump it or charge it, or replace the battery. I'd pass on replacing the starter relay, just observe the precautions.

I've rebuilt the final drive a couple of times. Never had a failure. Rebuilding final drives has been some kind of hobby. :)
If you are planning long vacation rides, a preeptive final drive rebuild is good road insurance for that year bike. (or just have a plan for an emergency final drive change out on the road).

I replaced the fuel line connectors with metal quick disconnects. That is a good idea.
Recently replaced the brake lines, but never had a brake line problem. Probably a good idea on a bike that old and given the reports of OEM brake line failure.

I'd put on a new set of tires. I'm partial to BridgeStones although I am now using the Bridgestone rear/Metz front combo since I am riding a little slower than I used to. A set of old Metzlers like you may have won't be nearly as grippy as a set of "Stones". Since you have such a great new bike, you deserve a new set of Bridgestones or Avons, they really set the bike free.

Enjoy the Ride :thumb:
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Congrats on your new bike.

Drilled the clutch housing weep hole. (Has anyone ever reported that the weep hole saved their clutch?) Although drilling the clutch housing weep hole is pretty quick and easy to do.


Enjoy the Ride :thumb:
The idea of drilling a hole where fluid is located seems crazy...like drilling a hole in the oil pan to check the fluid. What will the drilling of the weep hole relay as far as information to me? Are there any instructions on how to do this on the forum? Do I need a magnetized drill bit? Is it like getting a lobotomy?

I also need to take the tupperware off and get familiar with taking it off. This is certainly not like owning a Goldwing!
 

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The idea of drilling a hole where fluid is located seems crazy...like drilling a hole in the oil pan to check the fluid. What will the drilling of the weep hole relay as far as information to me? Are there any instructions on how to do this on the forum? Do I need a magnetized drill bit? Is it like getting a lobotomy?

I also need to take the tupperware off and get familiar with taking it off. This is certainly not like owning a Goldwing!
The LT has a dry clutch so no oil in the bell housing space or there shouldn't be :) Here is another view of where the hole needs to be from the inside. The clutch assembly rotates inside so don't drill in 5 inches. Once through the thin housing, stop and you are done. DO NOT drill into the oil pan or transmission by mistake. It should be pretty obvious and if it is not, don't do it.
 

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The idea of drilling a hole where fluid is located seems crazy...
I also need to take the tupperware off and get familiar with taking it off. This is certainly not like owning a Goldwing!
As noted above, there is no fluid around the BMW clutch (not supposed to be anyway :histerica )

Rear main seal leaks and clutch slave leaks have both fouled the dry clutch plates of the K1200LT resulting in slippage.
The bell housing weep hole is intended to allow oil from either of these two failures to drip out rather than collect in the bell housing and foul the clutch plates.

No, it isn't like a GoldWing. I have ridden a earlier model Gold Wing, it was a dog. We rented a more modern Gold Wing, a GL1800 and did the "Devil's Highway" in AZ in record time. The GW is a respectable and comfortable bike. A good bike, plenty of power, respectable handling, lot's of comfort. Kinda "sterile".

I've trailed groups of sport bike riders through the mountain passes of Vermont and New Hampshire, two up, on the K1200LT. Those riders have looked over their shoulder, surprised to see us still with them; we've gotten a "thumbs up" on occasion. You'll have time to learn: the GW is a respectable bike, the KLT is an awesome bike.
"Ride it like you stole it."

Yup, taking off the "tupper ware" is a skill needed to be learned. A power driver and a little practice, it is a matter of minutes.

German Engineering:
Maintenance - Complicated
Reliability - Questionable
Cost - Prohibitive
Performance - EXCEPTIONAL

Welcome to the mad house. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #14
The LT has a dry clutch so no oil in the bell housing space or there shouldn't be :) Here is another view of where the hole needs to be from the inside. The clutch assembly rotates inside so don't drill in 5 inches. Once through the thin housing, stop and you are done. DO NOT drill into the oil pan or transmission by mistake. It should be pretty obvious and if it is not, don't do it.
Well that sure as heck makes sense now. Dry clutch was not even a thought in my mind. I have started taking apart the covers and will need to replace the brake lines, along with the tires, pretty soon. I do subscribe to the "fix it when it breaks" mentality on some things and "preemptive preparedness" on others. With a bike this big, I just hope the force is with me on when one or the other happens!

Loving the input, please continue!
 

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... will....replace the brake lines, along with the tires, ...
Professor,
Do change out the valve stems when mounting new tires. There was a batch of bad valve stems as OEM fitment that had a tendency to rapidly let the air out!

Many of us switched to metal valve stems, but nothing wrong with good quality rubber ones.

Like just about everything related to K1200LT maintenance and repair, there are discussions deep in the archives here. Search feature on this site is a little clunky, but works. The Hall of Wisdom still has valuable info for your bike, if you haven't read it yet it would be worth your time.
 

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Well that sure as heck makes sense now. Dry clutch was not even a thought in my mind. I have started taking apart the covers and will need to replace the brake lines, along with the tires, pretty soon. I do subscribe to the "fix it when it breaks" mentality on some things and "preemptive preparedness" on others. With a bike this big, I just hope the force is with me on when one or the other happens!

Loving the input, please continue!
Brake lines are a good idea. The front one on my 06 split and shot fluid on/over the front fender to the tire when I squeezed the front brake. Luckily I was on the way to the dealer at the time.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G928A using Tapatalk
 
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Discussion Starter #17
Alright, first of all, thank you for the wonderful advice. I am just now starting to pull the tupperware off the bike to get familiar with undressing and dressing her (which is difficult as she is buttoned up tight).

Second of all, I plan on changing the brake lines, gear fluid and drilling the weep hole. While I am not so confident on brakes, I have done them before. Would a brake pump be beneficial to my cause or is it a waste of money if speed bleeders are installed?

Finally, can anyone share their favorite fluids for the bike? Oil, antifreeze mix, gear, clutch, brake and so on. Thanks again for all the insight!
 

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...Would a brake pump be beneficial to my cause or is it a waste of money if speed bleeders are installed?

Finally, can anyone share their favorite fluids for the bike? Oil, antifreeze mix, gear, clutch, brake and so on. Thanks again for all the insight!
Speedbleeders are the trick. A piece of tubing that will fit snugly over the speedbleeder and a container that won't tip over to catch the old fluid. No pump required in my experience.

Oh jeez, don't start an oil thread.
I've used good old petro-based lubes from WalMart under the SuperTech label for crankcase and final drive.
You'll get an endless list of specialty lubes and what is best; I think it makes little difference.
Popeye likes Olive Oil.
Synthetic gear lube in the tranny will help it shift a little easier.
I've used Prestone anti-freeze for years; the jug that says compatible with all vehicles and all color antifreeze.
Any quality DOT brake fluid will do, whatever the manual states; is it DOT 3 or DOT 4? IIRC I've been using DOT 4.

HTH
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Alright, currently have added speed sensor to (hopefully) fix my reverse not working, Spiegler brake lines and speed bleeders, replace fuel disconnects, weep hole for clutch, performance chip and removing tape player to prep for new radio.

Question: who was the German nutjob who made the oil view so difficult (impossible) to see with the naked eye? Rhetorical!

Real question: why do you have to remove the fuel tank to change out the fuel filter? Or is this only to get to the air filter underneath it?
But since I am doing the performance chip, I might as well take it off. Ugh..answering own question.
 

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Alright, currently have added speed sensor to (hopefully) fix my reverse not working, Spiegler brake lines and speed bleeders, replace fuel disconnects, weep hole for clutch, performance chip and removing tape player to prep for new radio.

Question: who was the German nutjob who made the oil view so difficult (impossible) to see with the naked eye? Rhetorical!

Real question: why do you have to remove the fuel tank to change out the fuel filter? Or is this only to get to the air filter underneath it?
But since I am doing the performance chip, I might as well take it off. Ugh..answering own question.
It is possible to drop the fuel pump module out the bottom by removing the right side bumper rail while leaning the bike over on the left side.

Air filter is a tank removal access only process.
 
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