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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)



I bought this LT today. It's my first BMW, and my first LT. It's a 1999 with a lot of extras. Low miles (25K) and previously owned by two gentlemen over age 60. I haven't ridden it yet, plan to pick it up on Thursday. This is my first large bike, both in weight and CCs. The seat is a little bit too high for me and I don't know if the seat can be adjusted as the factory seat has been replaced by Corbin seats. (cost $1300). I have boots but still need about 1/2 inch more low so I can touch the ground flat footed. Any suggestions appreciated as to how to reach the ground the way I'd like to. (deflate the tires? :D )
This is my first post, so plan to lurk for a while so I can learn as much as possible about this beauty.
Thank you all
EL
ps, I guess I should add that I'm 74 years old.
 

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Congratulation to your new Beauty Eddie.
The 99 is a very reliable bike be happy with it, have a lot of fun and many joyful miles.
Your seat hight must not be a problem. There are two positions in hight if you are already in the low position, you will find out if you get the bike, then try without changing anything is just a point of balance and feeling. I have this since 2001 can't reach down flat footed is no problem you getting used to it.

Manfred
 

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That's the best color, my 2k is the same, I cannot flat foot it, balls of feet only, watch road surface when coming to a stop.

I'm not quite 70 so gives all of us aging guys not there yet hope, enjoy
 

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Eddie,

Welcome to the forum, lurk to your hearts content but ask as many questions as you can think of great folks here to help.

Since you have an aftermarket seat you loose the height adjustment the OEM had. Some folks have added pads to the soles of the boots to get the feet on the ground. Perhaps you could contact the seat maker to see if they can lower the seat.

When you get the bike on the road be sure to stop with the front wheel STRAIGHT, otherwise it will take a nap. Don't slip the clutch when starting, let it out ASAP and then apply power. The engine likes high RPM's so spin it up over 4000 before shifting.

HTH :wave
 

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h Corbin seat does not have a height adjustment to it, they did however make a "low" seat pan which really means that they made the pan a little more narrow. When you are going to put your feet down you can slide forward in the seat a bit and reach the ground better. Sliding back and forth on the Corbin is easy since it is so firm.

If reaching the ground continues to be a problem you might want to consider searching the Classifieds on this site and flea-bay for a stock seat. With my stock seat in the high position I can easily flat-foot the bike, with the Corbin I can still flat foot but just barely.

Welcome to the club, just make sure to maintain her (lots of good info here on that) and the bike will reward you handsomely. Don't be afraid of the fat ole' gal, just remember there's ~800 lbs below your butt, it's easy to forget that fact once the bike is moving. Actively scan where you are going to stop before you get there and make sure that you won't end up with your feet going down in a low spot. Be more aware of road slope, dips at stop signs etc, because once she reaches a point of lean the only thing that will stop her from going down is the pavement, it will just thrash your body on the way if you try to stop her.
 

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Consider having thicker soles made for your riding boots. A number of forum members have gone this route with good success. The stock seat advice may or may not be good. Most folks (many folks?) opt to swap the stocker seat for an after market seat that is a little more keester kindly. Many different options but the additional sole height to your shoes might just work for you.

Enjoy!
 

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I had the same problem when I test rode mine, then the dealer lowered the suspension with an adjustment knob under the seat
Mine is an 09 so it may be different
 

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If you take it off the center stand, I think that your feet will touch the ground.
 

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Welcome! Glad that you found us. I truly believe that you are going to L-O-V-E your new ride!

Remember, keep the front wheel pointed dead ahead when you are coming to a stop!
 

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Don't know if this will make sense, or even help, but something I tell all new riders (new to riding and new to a particular bike). When coming to a stop, or planning a turn, stick with the plan. For example, you're coming to a stop sign and intend to stop (with the wheel straight) then turn right. Suddenly an opening suddenly appears. Try to avoid the instinct to change plans and jump on out there. Stop as you planned, plant your feet, then make your move. Changing plans in mid stream can be problematic, at least until you've gained a feel for this big beauty.
 

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I guess I am a little mystified about the necessity to "flat foot" the bike?? I am 6' plus a little, I ride with the seat in the high position, because it feels better riding...I can actually just about flat foot the bike at a stop by sliding forward on the seat. However, I rarely do that, because there doesn't seem to be a reason to...for starters, when you stop, you better have the bike balanced already, a little toe action can keep the bike upright, if you reach the point of needing a flat foot to hold the bike up, you are probably on your way over, and at 800lbs, two or three flat feet are not going to hold it up...For me, probably 50% of the time, I don't put my feet down at all. The bike seems to balance so well at slow speed, I just slow down to a crawl, and inch forward till it is time to go, otherwise, it is stop and put a toe down and wait for the opportunity to go.. Flat footing?? that is for light weight bikes you can still hold up while at a 45 degree angle...not this big girl!!
I forgot to congratulate you on getting the best bike ever, and the best kept secret in touring bikes...Your gonna love it!!
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks for all the good suggestions and comments. I should add that I've been riding m/c for around 50 years. Yes, longer than some people here have been alive! Actually, I remember riding as a passenger when I was 11 years old. That was in 1949! It must have been a HD or an Indian. I think that was when I fell in love with motorcycles.
I rode m/c as a cop for two departments.
The idea of adding to the sole of my boots will not work as the soles are knobbys. It's actually a walking Postal Approved boot (made in USA). I'm thinking maybe the soles should be smooth (?) See pic.
I pick up the LT on Thursday. And can hardly wait till I do a short-distance break-in. So far the fall weather here in the SJ Bay Area has been perfect for riding.
EL
 

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Discussion Starter #13
rhawk said:
If you take it off the center stand, I think that your feet will touch the ground.
Rand, I was referring to the position of my feet when the bike was off the center stand.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
casualemt said:
- - - I don't put my feet down at all. The bike seems to balance so well at slow speed, I just slow down to a crawl, and inch forward till it is time to go, otherwise, it is stop and put a toe down and wait for the opportunity to go..
I forgot to congratulate you on getting the best bike ever, and the best kept secret in touring bikes...Your gonna love it!!
Rich, I was told by the seller that the LT does not handle well at slow speed, that 5mph is as slow as you want to be. But I guess I'll have to find out when I start practicing riding it. Thanks for the congrats. I hope I will love it also. Time will tell.
EL
 

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Discussion Starter #15
fpmlt said:
Don't know if this will make sense, or even help, but something I tell all new riders (new to riding and new to a particular bike). When coming to a stop, or planning a turn, stick with the plan. For example, you're coming to a stop sign and intend to stop (with the wheel straight) then turn right. Suddenly an opening suddenly appears. Try to avoid the instinct to change plans and jump on out there. Stop as you planned, plant your feet, then make your move. Changing plans in mid stream can be problematic, at least until you've gained a feel for this big beauty.
Thanks for the advice. I'm storing all the advice and recommendations I get here. I'm new, but I can tell this is the place to go for LT expertise.
EL
 

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Discussion Starter #16
deputy5211 said:
Welcome! Glad that you found us. I truly believe that you are going to L-O-V-E your new ride!

Remember, keep the front wheel pointed dead ahead when you are coming to a stop!
Tony, I will PM you re: the seat.
Thanks
EL
ps, familiar with Royal Lane in N. Dallas?
 

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Discussion Starter #17
johnbaker15 said:
Eddie,

Welcome to the forum, lurk to your hearts content but ask as many questions as you can think of great folks here to help.

Since you have an aftermarket seat you loose the height adjustment the OEM had. Some folks have added pads to the soles of the boots to get the feet on the ground. Perhaps you could contact the seat maker to see if they can lower the seat.

When you get the bike on the road be sure to stop with the front wheel STRAIGHT, otherwise it will take a nap. Don't slip the clutch when starting, let it out ASAP and then apply power. The engine likes high RPM's so spin it up over 4000 before shifting.

HTH :wave
Gotcha. Seems everyone seems to know about the straight-wheel-when-stopping rule. As for the seat adjustment the consensus is that the Corbin seat is non-adjustable. And I have a ton of questions, but I'll first see if I can find the answers in the archives. If I can't, you'll be hearing more from me.
Thanks for your input
EL
 

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Discussion Starter #18
gary45 said:
That's the best color, my 2k is the same, I cannot flat foot it, balls of feet only, watch road surface when coming to a stop.

I'm not quite 70 so gives all of us aging guys not there yet hope, enjoy
My whole family thinks I'm crazy for buying yet another bike. I think they're mad cause I'm spending their inheritance. :D
 

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Welcome to the forum! Lots of expertise here.

Based on my vast (1 year) experience with the '99LT:
1. Planning ahead makes a big difference. Planned stops seem to work a lot better than unplanned stops (which usually involve abandoning a previous plan). As a previous poster said- plan the stop and stop per plan.
2. Muscle will not hold her up. Skill and care will. I started riding the LT while recovering from major surgery gone wrong- little or no strength as a result, but I managed.
3. Check out the "Ride Like A Pro" DVD's. Lots of good techniques and tips.
4. Low speeds are not bad. With a little practice you should be easily able to crawl along.
5. Don't drag your feet! I know this is tempting- you think you can still keep everything upright if something goes wrong. All it really does is give you the opportunity to perfect your skills with crutches or a cane as you recover from the twisted or broken ankle. (I learned that one on a 1977 KZ60C1).

Having ridden middleweight street bikes (500/750CC range) since 1973, the LT was a big change, but a worthwhile one. Much more comfortable than my other bikes and more enjoyable than I expected.

Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter #20
r_figueroa said:
Welcome to the forum! Lots of expertise here.

Based on my vast (1 year) experience with the '99LT:
1. Planning ahead makes a big difference. Planned stops seem to work a lot better than unplanned stops (which usually involve abandoning a previous plan). As a previous poster said- plan the stop and stop per plan.
2. Muscle will not hold her up. Skill and care will. I started riding the LT while recovering from major surgery gone wrong- little or no strength as a result, but I managed.
3. Check out the "Ride Like A Pro" DVD's. Lots of good techniques and tips.
4. Low speeds are not bad. With a little practice you should be easily able to crawl along.
5. Don't drag your feet! I know this is tempting- you think you can still keep everything upright if something goes wrong. All it really does is give you the opportunity to perfect your skills with crutches or a cane as you recover from the twisted or broken ankle. (I learned that one on a 1977 KZ60C1).

Having ridden middleweight street bikes (500/750CC range) since 1973, the LT was a big change, but a worthwhile one. Much more comfortable than my other bikes and more enjoyable than I expected.

Good luck!
Thank you Mr. F. for the advice. Hope you're recovering well from your surgery. Where can I get that DVD you speak of? I also was a mid-range driver so this is a huge step up for me.
And thanks for the welcome.
btw, it may be a while, but one of my long-range plans is to motor on down to FL. I have a friend of 51 years living in Haines City I'd like to visit.
EL
 
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