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Discussion Starter #1
I have been thinking for a long time about a lift, but have never sprung for one. My knees are getting worse and the getting up and down is starting to wear me out. I started reading some threads on this forum about lifts and what I hadn't thought of was the weight and balance of the LT.

It looks to me like a dangerous thing to get the LT on and off the lift. I do not have anyone to help me at all. The only safe thing I could think of was to cut out the shop floor and flush mount the lift, but I am not prepaired to do that at this time.

Comments please.
 

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Boatzo said:
I have been thinking for a long time about a lift, but have never sprung for one. My knees are getting worse and the getting up and down is starting to wear me out. I started reading some threads on this forum about lifts and what I hadn't thought of was the weight and balance of the LT.

It looks to me like a dangerous thing to get the LT on and off the lift. I do not have anyone to help me at all. The only safe thing I could think of was to cut out the shop floor and flush mount the lift, but I am not prepaired to do that at this time.

Comments please.
I use a couple of timbers on either side of the lift to put my feet when riding the bike on and off the lift. I drag them out of the way once the bike is on the lift.

You could build a couple of boxes using boards and achieve the same result.
 

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I just purchased a used Handy Lift that came with side extensions for the lift surface and Ramp. The side extensions make it easy to ride on as you have a place for your feet. It has a crank front tire clamp and eye tie downs. It is a ride on and clamp by yourself operation. I love it. I guess they are out of business now but if you can find a used one, they are built like a tank and weigh the same!
 

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I used to just ride mine on and off my Harbor Freight 1250 lb air/hydraulic lift. Got it a little crossed up once but didn't drop it. lkneiss sent me a pic a few weeks ago of his new lift so I decided it was about time to add siderails. I bought a few feet of 11/2" x 11/2" x 3/16" angle and welded a piece about 18" from the front and back of the lift and carriage bolted on my 2 x 10 loading ramps.

Now it feels like I have a sidewalk on both sides of my lift! Also very handy for placing tools on just before you knock 'em to the floor.

I built up the bottom portion of the ramp about 3" , essentially decreasing the angle in order to keep from hitting the transmission guard. I also installed a wheel chock that you just ride the front wheel into and it captures the front tire which will hold the bike upright. I also put a couple tie downs around the front forks just to make me feel better. I have no trouble putting the beastie on the lift myself.

One last thing. I also put some non-skid stick down stuff on the deck of the lift because without it there was no way to stop the bike with the brakes once the rear wheel started down the ramp. The friction of the front tire on the diamon plate was not enough to overcome gravity.

I would take some pics if it would help.

Loren
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Loren,

Pictures would help a lot.

Do you ride into the front wheel chock and leave the bike into it while you dismount and then put the bike on the center stand?

My other concern is backing off the lift. I just find the LT so awkward to horse around and am scared to death of dropping it on a lift.
 

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i put a 3/16" plate,6"s wider each side. works great for entry/exit and also gives a shelf to put tools on and makes the deck a little more ridgid.
john
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for that link Lee. I watched their video as well, looks like a good lift. I am not sure I understand what you mean "wheel a deal". Are they very negotiable from their posted prices or does it have to do with what they may have in stock? Curious.
 

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Bill, I have spent HOURS getting the video taken, converted, hosted, etc. to get this to you. It was worth every second I spent on the project as I have finally figured out the process. Thanks for the push! I needed it.

It really is easy to load and unload the bike from the lift. Until I welded the angle iron supports and commandeered my pickup loading ramps to make side extensions I used to just load it on using the width of the lift only. It is much safer now with the side extensions!

Please note: Some safety equipment was removed in order to clarify the process being filmed. Do not try this at home without all safety equipment installed! (tee hee hee)

Side view of lift with homemade extensions and ramp raiser to reduce angle of ramp:



End view of ramp in lowered position. Note that there is a removable section on the lift which can be removed in order to remove the rear wheel. Make sure your lift has this option. It's very handy:



View of Harbor Freight Wheel Chock. This is what allows me to place the bike on the ramp unassisted. It is not evident in the video below but once the front wheel is in the chock there is no need to hold on to the bike. I do toss a couple straps around the front forks above the front fender just to be absolutely sure but there is no issue getting on or off the bike safely without it being strapped down. I also make sure the forks are strapped when I use my mini floor jack to raise the rear of the bike off the lift.:



Here is a professionally filmed :histerica, edited :histerica:histerica, and produced :histerica:histerica:histerica video of the drive on, capture, release, and ride off of the ramp. I hired a professional camera woman (my wife) and a dashing actor to portray myself riding the bike. The bike was ridden onto the ramp, captured in the wheel chock, the bike was dismounted, lifting/lowering simulated, and the bike was finally backed out of the chock and down the ramp.

I may move the side boards toward the rear of the lift by about 6-8 inches.

Enjoy!:



Loren





Boatzo said:
Loren,

Pictures would help a lot.

Do you ride into the front wheel chock and leave the bike into it while you dismount and then put the bike on the center stand?

My other concern is backing off the lift. I just find the LT so awkward to horse around and am scared to death of dropping it on a lift.
 

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Loren,

Great work on your first first production! You will have votes from the whole academy, I'm sure as this really shows how easy it is done and eliminates fears from the unexperienced.

I agree that moving the side boards back a few inches may add to the stability as your foot seems to be in the air for that split second.

Thanks for sharing... I'm sure you will now get a group wanting to come over to work on their bike... just remember, I have first dibs!

Mugz
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Loren,

Thanks for all the effort you and your professional camera operator put into the video, that was extremely informative. I can easily see that the side extensions are a must and agree that you need some more extension at the back. Looks a bit shakey backing off and not having terrafirma under your feet. I had not seen that forward wheel chock before, looks like a good thing to have.

I guess I was mistaken in thinking that you put the bike on the center stand. From what you said, I assume you use a jack? I still feel very very nervous about getting the bike back off the lift. I think if I go for it, I will try it for a while and then probably bite the bullet and cut the floor and flush mount the lift.

I assume also that if you are removing the front wheel, you do it on the floor and not on the lift?

You may have found yourself a new career in film making. Something to look forward to in your retirement. :D Thanks again for all the effort.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
PS. Loren,

Glad to see that you didn't need your AIR BAGS in that operation :histerica
 

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They will barter on price a bit. I never paid near that but it was a few years ago since I bought mine. Not sure if steel prices have affected pricing but I would think you could get 50-100 off that price.

Also picking it up will save you a lot of shipping money and they have a few locations. I went to Delaware to get mine in a pickup truck.

I has held up well and looks as new with little wear or tear on it.



Boatzo said:
Thanks for that link Lee. I watched their video as well, looks like a good lift. I am not sure I understand what you mean "wheel a deal". Are they very negotiable from their posted prices or does it have to do with what they may have in stock? Curious.
 

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LAF said:
Here is what I use. I went to Delaware to pick it up and did not pay near that for it. You can call and wheel and deal.

I wanted a Handy but could not afford it. I need to park on it so I wanted side extensions and that really put the Handy out of reach for me.

http://www.gregsmithequipment.com/ProductDetails.asp?ProductCode=TPPROCYCLE-DT%2FTPXLT-KIT

It is a very nice lift and handled the LT with ease.
I also have the Direct Lift XLT DT from Greg Smith (bought it at their Indianapolis store). It's the only lift I have personal experience with, but it's been easy to use, I feel safe on it, etc. I have the side extensions, also. No need for entrance ramp extensions, and the rear wheel drop-out is worth its weight in gold because it means I don't have to remove the trailer hitch before dropping the wheel.

I would NOT want to ride onto or off a lift without some type of side extension (factory or home-made). That said, the tech at both dealerships I have been to push the LT onto the ramp, by hand. I guess you get used to it.

Maybe I'm doing an unsafe thing here, but I don't even use the chock that came with my lift. I ride on, stop at the forward-most point of the lift, engage the center stand, then dismount. I run the lift up and down without additional tiedowns. The first 2 times I changed oil I used tiedowns. After that I quit doing it. The LT seems pretty stable to me... on the center stand... 3' in the air. If I did something more than simple fluid changes I'd probably tie it down.
 

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I would like to thank all the members of the academy...........

But seriously though. To remove the front wheel I put the bike on the lift, then use a little mini floor jack to raise the bike enough to extend the center stand. Two straps hold the rear wheel onto the deck and put tension on the bike extending toward the rear of the lift. This raises the front wheel out of the chock. Two additional straps from the riders foot pegs extending toward the front keep the bike from sliding backward on the lift.

This works but when I replaced the front tire and the front brake pads I actually did the work with the bike off the lift. Served as a great reminder why I have the lift. Too old, fat, and lazy to work from the floor!

Loren


Boatzo said:
Loren,

Thanks for all the effort you and your professional camera operator put into the video, that was extremely informative. I can easily see that the side extensions are a must and agree that you need some more extension at the back. Looks a bit shakey backing off and not having terrafirma under your feet. I had not seen that forward wheel chock before, looks like a good thing to have.

I guess I was mistaken in thinking that you put the bike on the center stand. From what you said, I assume you use a jack? I still feel very very nervous about getting the bike back off the lift. I think if I go for it, I will try it for a while and then probably bite the bullet and cut the floor and flush mount the lift.

I assume also that if you are removing the front wheel, you do it on the floor and not on the lift?

You may have found yourself a new career in film making. Something to look forward to in your retirement. :D Thanks again for all the effort.
 

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I would like to thank all the members of the academy...........

But seriously though. To remove the front wheel I put the bike on the lift, then use a little mini floor jack to raise the bike enough to extend the center stand. Two straps hold the rear wheel onto the deck and put tension on the bike extending toward the rear of the lift. This raises the front wheel out of the chock. Two additional straps from the riders foot pegs extending toward the front keep the bike from sliding backward on the lift.

This works but when I replaced the front tire and the front brake pads I actually did the work with the bike off the lift. Served as a great reminder why I have the lift. Too old, fat, and lazy to work from the floor!

Loren


Boatzo said:
Loren,

Thanks for all the effort you and your professional camera operator put into the video, that was extremely informative. I can easily see that the side extensions are a must and agree that you need some more extension at the back. Looks a bit shakey backing off and not having terrafirma under your feet. I had not seen that forward wheel chock before, looks like a good thing to have.

I guess I was mistaken in thinking that you put the bike on the center stand. From what you said, I assume you use a jack? I still feel very very nervous about getting the bike back off the lift. I think if I go for it, I will try it for a while and then probably bite the bullet and cut the floor and flush mount the lift.

I assume also that if you are removing the front wheel, you do it on the floor and not on the lift?

You may have found yourself a new career in film making. Something to look forward to in your retirement. :D Thanks again for all the effort.
 

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lkniess said:
I just purchased a used Handy Lift that came with side extensions for the lift surface and Ramp. The side extensions make it easy to ride on as you have a place for your feet. It has a crank front tire clamp and eye tie downs. It is a ride on and clamp by yourself operation. I love it. I guess they are out of business now but if you can find a used one, they are built like a tank and weigh the same!
I found this on the web for around 900.00.
Is this the same lift you guys are talking about?

http://www.oncycles.com/catalog.asp?r=1&pn=MCS00161
 

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I have a question about the wheel chock. Will the front wheel remain in the chock when you put it on the centerstand? I've got the cheaper harbour freight lift which works fine. I've just been using the original clamp that came with it. Ride up to the stop plate, put side stand down, get off bike & put on centerstand. Then screw clamp down. The chock would be a lot easier/safer if the wheel remains in the chock.
 

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Razmataz said:
I have a question about the wheel chock. Will the front wheel remain in the chock when you put it on the centerstand? I've got the cheaper harbour freight lift which works fine. I've just been using the original clamp that came with it. Ride up to the stop plate, put side stand down, get off bike & put on centerstand. Then screw clamp down. The chock would be a lot easier/safer if the wheel remains in the chock.

Only if you have two helpers to lift the rear as you put down the centerstand. I like a wheel chock (and have a Baxley) but that is the only short coming of using one, getting the centerstand down while you are in it.
Also it lifts the front wheel up a bit and when you do get the centerstand down there is often no clearance at the rear wheel.
From the looks of the video it appears the HF chock is less of a lifting impact on the front wheel as compared to the Baxley. I may just get one for my lift and keep the Baxley for trailer use.
 
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