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Here's a link that has tons of additional links for ways to stay cool while using the various types of cooling vests found on the market!

I'm in the early stages of designing a recirculating cooling vest using 3/16" - 1/4" clear tubing, 90 degree elbows, reducers, and a 12 volt pump system (pulse, constant, or variable switching). It looks easy enough....just need to do a few refinements. :stir:

What would be really cool is to find a pump system that draws <.5-1.5 amps (?) so I can adapt a solar panel system as a constant power for a recirculating pump....not a bad idea since the majority of the time you use it is in the daytime! "Coolant" recharge would come when you stop for gas....just go to the coke machines, fill a handy cup you carry around with you with lots of ice...and pour it into the top of the attached hydration pack! I haven't done much looking yet....still limited in my mobility....this is what happens when you have nothing but time on your hands!

Has anyone already made their own homemade version that they'd like to share on the forum....or on this thread? :rolleyes:

Yes....I know there are several manufacturers of this type of concept and its not new.....but at <$60 for a home-made version vs. >$300 for a marketed version.....just thinking. :think:
 

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I don't think a cup full of ice is going to do it.. Capacity = Time... Most of the real ones use an ice chest that you put a block or two of ice in..... That's Capacity.....And insulated lines to and from the vest...

There are several on the market at this time.

Good Luck with yours...

John
 

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Kenny, this has been something of a passion for me as I HATE the FREAKIN' HEAT!!! I too like to think about ways to design functional items for my own use.

Here is where I'm at. I work at a large medical center where we are required to use recirculating warm water to provide localized topical heat to our patients. Electric heating pads cannot be used because they have the potential to develop hot spots and if a thermostat fails there is the risk of burns,

What we use is a pump with a thermostatically controlled heater and quick release hoses (they don't stop the flow when they are unplugged) and a heating pad that is full of channels.

The pads are a single use item. Patient is discharged and the pads are thrown away. I have had housekeeping keep an eye out for clean (no bodily fluids) pads which they collect for me. I then clean them with an alcohol based cleaner and then with a sodium hypochlorite solution to kill any pathogens. The pads range in size from about 14"X16" up to body length and approx 2' width. these pads could be stitched at the borders to a thin t-shirt with your riding gear going over the top.

What I need to find are self sealing quick dis-connects for 1/4" hoses and a pump that would have the duty cycle to stay intact over a long period of time.

Right now I have a 12V windshield washer pump but I wouldn't trust it over the long haul. An emergency 12V submersible aquarium pump would be ideal.

I would be more than willing to send you some of the heating pads if you are interested. Just pm me if you want me to send you some samples or to just send you a couple pictures. My supply is virtually limitless.

I built an evaporative cooling vest that works great in the low humidity part of the world I live in. It will easily last more than 12 hours once it is hydrated. I tested it one 97*F day and in 1 1/2 hours it lost only 4 ounces when worn under Olympian mesh gear. It is heavy but very effective. It weighs 15.1 ozs dry and over 9 lbs wet. The weight never bothered me when I was riding

I feel the best solution will ultimately be phase change technology. They are reasonable to buy at about $140 with one set of phase change packs and about $100 for another set of packs. They recharge in 15 minutes in ice water and last around 2 - 3 hours in use. Their temperature is constant as they go from a solid back to a liquid.

Loren
 

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Kenny, you are not off the mark here. My wife had shoulder surgery and came home with a small ice chest with a recirculating pump. this was connected with two insulated tubes up to a plastic harness that covered the shoulder. The ice chest takes about three trays of ice and filled with water.That and another member here in Sac is barking up the same tree. albeit, no where near starting in on the project... keep us posted, it can be done!


JPSpen said:
I don't think a cup full of ice is going to do it.. Capacity = Time... Most of the real ones use an ice chest that you put a block or two of ice in..... That's Capacity.....And insulated lines to and from the vest...
John
 
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