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Discussion Starter #1
My '03 LTC with 23k on the odometer now has a slipping clutch :(

I had already read up on most of the clutch threads and had planned to drill the weep hole - but didn't get around to it yet. I'm going to take a shot at the wrenching myself (can't afford dealer service). There are a few questions I haven't seen the answers to yet:

1. How long can I put off the job? Right now it only slips with significant throttle going uphill. I assume eventually it will slip so bad that I can't maintain highway speeds. Will that happen within days, or can I nurse it along until winter?

2. Is there a rebuild kit that I should order ahead of time, or do I need to tear it apart first and diagnose each part?

3. This symptom is preceded by two significant events: Less than 1,000 miles ago, I had a questionable dealership bleed the brakes & clutch circuits. They said the clutch bleed screw had "previously" been crossthreaded and/or broken off, which necessitated a lot of extra labor & parts. Is it possible that something they did either caused or accelerated the clutch issue? Secondly, I loaned the bike just last weekend to a friend, who put about 275 miles on it riding 2-up through twisties in the mountains. I'd like to think his riding style is OK, although he rides a sport bike. Clutch was fine before his trip, and I noticed the slip almost immediately after the trip (haven't asked him about it yet). Would clutch failure have been imminent regardless of this trip?

4. Anyone wanna help me rebuild my clutch? ;)
 

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Dave,

I don't think there is anything that your friend or dealer could have done that would cause the slipping clutch. That is assuming it is contaminated with oil. I suppose your friend could have trashed the clutch with a few too many hole shots or slipping the clutch too much but I wouldn't think that was the case.

While your in there take care of the slave cylinder, the seal from the slave cylinder into the transmission and I think the rear engine seal. Someone will respond with a complete list of the seals to replace and the clutch parts that you'll need.

I think you need to repair this soon. It could go out in relatively few miles.

Good Luck,
Kevin
 

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Never,never,ever,never let a friend ride your bike.

The best handling, fastest accelerating, hardest braking, peg dragging motorcycles are those which are not owned by the test pilot.

I hope you can afford to get the parts needed for your clutch soon, and as stated, you will find all the help and positive advice you need about the repair here. I would gather all parts needed before the teardown, so when you get started you can carry the momentum all the way through the job. One weekend should suffice if you are setup with all the tools you need. Maybe less if you have some good alert help, save the beer for celebration AFTER the tools are cleaned up and put away.


Good luck, I'm sorry you have to go through a clutch job, but the experience will never be forgotten.

:bmw:
 

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Do clutches not like this time of year????

I offer you my fullest sympathies, mine is in the shop at the moment waiting to be stripped. I too wonder whilst it is stripped is it worth replacing the slave cylinder and any other seals that may not have leaked, as of yet I don't know the culprit causing my clutch slippage. It just goes to show that BMW obviously means Bring More Wonga!!! When I hear from my tech I will post as to what went wrong.
 

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No matter what you do to fix it you need to understand exactly what the problem is and why the clutch is slipping before you just wholesale replace the clutch. Since it started slipping after a 275 mile run where you were not near or with the bike you don't know if there were any extenuating circumstances.

At this point I would not put any more miles on the LT. The more the clutch spins the more contamination will find it's way to the clutch. Of course we are assuming that there is some sort of oil getting on the clutch.

To determine if you have slave cylinder contamination you need to pull the slave and that requires the special socket to put the swing arm back on. I would not do that unless you can borrow or make the tool.

While you are in there inspecting the slave and doing the weep hole drill you can pull the rod see if the rod and the felt pad has fluid on it. If it doesn't then you need to determine if there is engine oil in the clutch housing... There has been at least one member that has drilled an inspection hole. Drilling the inspection hole may give you an idea if you have a seal on the engine side gone bad.

Either one of these two procedures should give you an idea if oil contamination is your problem. If you can't find oil in the housing then you might logically assume that there was significant mistreatment of the clutch and you might try to work it out..

I have read that a few members experienced 'some' slipping and it went away.. :confused: doesn't sound good but because you don't know what really happened on those last 300 miles...

Bottom line is the more spins on the clutch without doing something the worse it should get if you have contamination. If the source is the clutch slave and you clean the rod and replace the pad and stop the source it may not get worse.. I have not read of anyone saving their clutch this way but it really comes down to how much fluid is on the friction plate..

I'm sure someone else will add another suggestion. I have not done a clutch but I have read all the posts. That doesn't qualify me as an expert in any way... so maybe someone else will offer more or better advice.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Not looking good

I looked under the bike this morning... it ain't pretty. No puddles on the floor (yet), but it's pretty wet (see photo below). Does this still look like a possible slave cylinder failure? Seems like a lot of fluid for a weeping slave seal. Not sure what other failure modes come into play here - main seal between engine and clutch?

Anyone out there have a list of part numbers & tools for a clutch rebuild? I have Kevin Cook's most excellent weep hole drilling procedure PDF, which has a great list of parts, tools & materials needed for that job.

While I've got 'er nekkid, I'll replace the fuel & air filters, do the canisterectomy... any other suggestions?

 

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Thor1340 said:
----------- mine is in the shop at the moment waiting to be stripped. I too wonder whilst it is stripped is it worth replacing the slave cylinder and any other seals that may not have leaked, -------------
In my opinion, NOT replacing the rear engine oil seal and O-ring, front and rear transmission input shaft seals, and the slave cylinder while in there would be pretty a pretty foolish thing to do. Once all the labor to get the transmission and clutch out is done, there is only a small relative cost to add replacement of every other possible leak source to forestall having to repeat the costly work again in the likely NEAR future. While the transmision is out, replace the rear output seal too. That is not a big problem if it leaks, just a little oil in your parking spot, but again, easy and low cost to do it while is readily accessable.
 
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