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Upon buying my baby a year ago, thanks to the wisdom of this forum, one of the first things I did was to tether my mirrors. A couple months ago when I was in the middle lane of the X bronx distress way on a beautiful, traffic packed Sunday, I hit a crater which rattled my teeth and knocked both mirrors off the supports. As they dangled from the tethers I was thinking how lucky I was that I had read the posts and saved my mirrors. I first thought about slamming them back into place - not a good idea while traveling at 65 on a busy highway. Next I figured I'd just pull over and put them back - great idea except I had NO rearview exposure and the breakdown lane was 4' wide and as Josey Wales said "dying ain't much of a livin'". Hit the next crater and the left side tether broke (shame on me) and I still couldn't see behind me. Well, finally got over, attached the right side and headed home. Reflecting on that episode it hit me - wow that took some time, that saving a few hundred dollars and the anxiety of the people behind me as the mirror bounced down the road paled in comparison to the fact I had lost all rear visibility. Yipes I thought, I could have been killed. So I ask you, what is the down side of putting a screw through the air intake of the mirror into the cowl to keep the damn thing on the bike? Won't see it so the asthetics will be fine, won't pop off when hitting a bump, might break when the baby goes to sleep instead of coming off.
 

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I can't really comment on whether to permanently attach the mirrors to your bike, but I would think that might cause even more damage (mirrors and body work?). I would offer one thought, though. I had my mirrors detach (tethered, fortunatly) a couple of times when hitting potholes until reading on this forum about greasing the studs so the mirrors seat more completely (not exactly an intuitive procedure :D ). I did that and haven't lost one since. If you haven't done this, you might want to try it before the permanent attachment solution.
 

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Along with the grease the mirrows need a slight gap between the body and the mirrows. The flexing of the plastic pannels can dislodge them.
 

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The only downside I could see to attaching the mirrors with a screw is if someone working on the bike wasn't expecting them. Could a well-intentioned technician cause some damage when trying to remove the mirrors, thinking they needed some additional effort to be removed?
 

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A leetle off-topic, butt not by much.

Wonder what model year will they introduce the remote controlled, hinged rear-view mirrors on the LT, similar to the system on many cages?? AND, incorporate the Muth Mirror turn-signal system?? :confused: :rolleyes: ;)
 

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BigGeo said:
Upon buying my baby a year ago, thanks to the wisdom of this forum, one of the first things I did was to tether my mirrors. A couple months ago when I was in the middle lane of the X bronx distress way on a beautiful, traffic packed Sunday, I hit a crater which rattled my teeth and knocked both mirrors off the supports. As they dangled from the tethers I was thinking how lucky I was that I had read the posts and saved my mirrors. I first thought about slamming them back into place - not a good idea while traveling at 65 on a busy highway. Next I figured I'd just pull over and put them back - great idea except I had NO rearview exposure and the breakdown lane was 4' wide and as Josey Wales said "dying ain't much of a livin'". Hit the next crater and the left side tether broke (shame on me) and I still couldn't see behind me. Well, finally got over, attached the right side and headed home. Reflecting on that episode it hit me - wow that took some time, that saving a few hundred dollars and the anxiety of the people behind me as the mirror bounced down the road paled in comparison to the fact I had lost all rear visibility. Yipes I thought, I could have been killed. So I ask you, what is the down side of putting a screw through the air intake of the mirror into the cowl to keep the damn thing on the bike? Won't see it so the asthetics will be fine, won't pop off when hitting a bump, might break when the baby goes to sleep instead of coming off.
There is a thread from several years ago of someone doing that with pictures of how he did it. I think he used a heavy plastic screw that would possible sheer off upon impact.
 

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BigGeo said:
paled in comparison to the fact I had lost all rear visibility. Yipes I thought, I could have been killed.
Do they not teach you to turn your head and look behind you in America? Over here it is known as the "Lifesaver" for good reason and does not rely on mirrors. Not doing it will be an instant fail in a UK motorcycle driving test. In fact a great many motorcycles do not even have mirrors to start with. I agree that mirrors are useful, but only as a backup, due to blind spots.

I particular, changing lanes relying on mirrors alone is a collision waiting to happen.
 

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As my mirros are heavier (and more expensive) than stock mirrors due to the Muth signal mirrors and additional LED turn signals I decided to make 100 % sure that I will not loose them.

At first I tethered them with a small steel line that fishermen use for their lures or trolls. (Of curse I had also elecric cables for the turn signals that would act as tetheres.)

But still I disliked the idea of having my mirros dangling on the side of the bike in case they would come loose so I used the screws.

My original idea was to use 5 mm plastic screws but as I could not find them without some efforts I decided to use regular allen screws. However, I used a hacksaw to make the neck of the screw head real thin in order to make sure it breaks from there in case something unexpected happens...
And this happened. In fact this unexpected happened in Tennesee just the previous night we arrived to CCR 06 in Braselton. I was making a real tight U-turn on a slight uphill and I dropped the bike. The left side mirror hit the ground, and the back of the mirror broke since my trimmed allen screw did not break.:( Conclusion: It is really hard to estimate how thin the steel screw should actually be in order to make it work like a safety plug.
Luckily I was able to glue the mirror frame with some epoxy and when I got home I finally searched for the plastic screws.

So, you can use screws in addition to the tetheres to secure the mirros but ONLY USE PLASTIC SCREWS.

Regards
 

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Agree, mirrors are no substitute for looking over the shoulder. However, maybe you've never experienced the Cross Bronx Expressway, crappy road and drivers to match. I've ridden in England and I don't believe you have anything that bad. Only place I've found worse was Lagos (Nigeria). A rider needs every possible resource/advantage to stay upright on the X-Bronx. I don't know if there is anything that will keep the mirrors on if you hit one of the craters on the X-Bronx. I've had mine come off plenty of times and fortunately, the tethers kept them from joining the other litter on the roadway.

Ajlelectronics said:
Do they not teach you to turn your head and look behind you in America? Over here it is known as the "Lifesaver" for good reason and does not rely on mirrors. Not doing it will be an instant fail in a UK motorcycle driving test. In fact a great many motorcycles do not even have mirrors to start with. I agree that mirrors are useful, but only as a backup, due to blind spots.

I particular, changing lanes relying on mirrors alone is a collision waiting to happen.
 

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Ajlelectronics said:
Do they not teach you to turn your head and look behind you in America? Over here it is known as the "Lifesaver" for good reason and does not rely on mirrors. Not doing it will be an instant fail in a UK motorcycle driving test. In fact a great many motorcycles do not even have mirrors to start with. I agree that mirrors are useful, but only as a backup, due to blind spots.

I particular, changing lanes relying on mirrors alone is a collision waiting to happen.
MUST HAVE MIRRORS!!!

Here in the Colonies they also teach you to use those wonderfully reflective mirrors. Nice to see what's coming up behind you as you ride down the highway in case you need to get out of the way. Same thing sitting at an intersection. Good to know if the guy coming up behind you is going to stop or just blow right through you. You might at least have a chance getting out of the way if you can see 'em coming!

Changing lanes? Check your mirrors, turn your head far enough to check the blind spot, signal, and make your move.

Riding down the road use your rear views to gather information about what is going on behind you. The 'behind you' stuff can kill you just as dead as the 'beside you' and 'in front of you' stuff once it catches up to you.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Ajlelectronics said:
Do they not teach you to turn your head and look behind you in America? Over here it is known as the "Lifesaver" for good reason and does not rely on mirrors. Not doing it will be an instant fail in a UK motorcycle driving test. In fact a great many motorcycles do not even have mirrors to start with. I agree that mirrors are useful, but only as a backup, due to blind spots.

I particular, changing lanes relying on mirrors alone is a collision waiting to happen.
Apparently, the roads and drivers in Jolly Old England are quite a bit different than in the colonies. First, we drive on the proper side of the road. Second, I use my mirrors to maintain primary rear/side view knowledge. Perhaps in England you have enough time to look over your shoulder and back with absolutely no prior knowledge of what is around you, we don't normally have that privilege. So brother, if you feel safe riding with no mirrors, I tip my hat to you. With the Chinese coming up with a $150 replacement for a broken mirror I believe I'll try the screw solution. My girl has taken a nap 3 times on me and never popped a mirror.
 

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I've seen RT mirrors installed on the handle bars (already have the holes in place) of LTs for those that don't like to look down for their mirrors. Not a bad looking mod either and solves the problem with the loss of a mirror.
BTW: I ALWAYS "look to live" before a lane change. Just a long time habit I have.

Jer
 

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Cable Ties, they're the answer . . . . there are two lugs, one inside the mirror body, one inside the housing it attaches on the fairing . . . cable tie loosely, and you'll never loose a mirror again . . . works for me!
 

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BigGeo said:
Apparently, the roads and drivers in Jolly Old England are quite a bit different than in the colonies. First, we drive on the proper side of the road.
No, you drive on the right.
And it's not "Jolly Old England" anymore, we have Golden Brown laying it all to waste his scorched earth policy, before he is out on his ear.

BigGeo said:
Second, I use my mirrors to maintain primary rear/side view knowledge.
Not possible. A mirror view is incomplete and does not give you spatial awareness. A quick look over your shoulder will complete the picture, especially when overtaking or changing lanes.

BigGeo said:
Perhaps in England you have enough time to look over your shoulder and back with absolutely no prior knowledge of what is around you,
Perhaps in America, if you don't have time to look behind to save your life, you may be driving too fast and too close?

Mirrors are useful I agree, but if you are incapable of riding without them, then it's time for a little brush up training. It's you that will come off worst when you pull into the path of someone trying to overtake. I did that just once, to make me realise how stupid it is not to use the lifesaver.
[/QUOTE]
 

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Ajlelectronics said:
Do they not teach you to turn your head and look behind you in America? Over here it is known as the "Lifesaver" for good reason and does not rely on mirrors. Not doing it will be an instant fail in a UK motorcycle driving test. In fact a great many motorcycles do not even have mirrors to start with. I agree that mirrors are useful, but only as a backup, due to blind spots.

I particular, changing lanes relying on mirrors alone is a collision waiting to happen.
You need to depend on your mirrors when driving. The need to turn your head is not the sign of a good driver/rider. When you turn your head, you take your eyes off of what's in front of you which is dangerous.

It's a mirror, they don't fail and they don't lie, there is no problem depending on them.
 

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Caveno said:
You need to depend on your mirrors when driving. The need to turn your head is not the sign of a good driver/rider. When you turn your head, you take your eyes off of what's in front of you which is dangerous.

What a load of (dangerous) rubbish. Thank heaven I am unlikely to encounter you on my travels. Mirrors are SECONDARY.

Once again, if you do not have the time for PROPER observation, you are DRIVING TOO CLOSE and TOO FAST.
 

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AJ, I don't think anyone is disagreeing with you that one needs to turn ones head and look before changing lanes. I personally, as do others, use the mirrors extensively in order to know what's happening behind and beside me as I tool down the road. I do not turn my head 180 degrees to look behind me in order to identify potential sources of peril coming up behind me in the same lane. I use my mirrors for this purpose. Mirrors are also useful to see what's coming up beside you.

To change lanes? Check the mirrors for what's coming up behind and to the side, signal, TURN YOUR HEAD AND LOOK, and if all's clear make your lane change and get on with life.
 

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wa1200lt said:
AJ, I don't think anyone is disagreeing with you that one needs to turn ones head and look before changing lanes. I personally, as do others, use the mirrors extensively in order to know what's happening behind and beside me as I tool down the road. I do not turn my head 180 degrees to look behind me in order to identify potential sources of peril coming up behind me in the same lane. I use my mirrors for this purpose. Mirrors are also useful to see what's coming up beside you.

To change lanes? Check the mirrors for what's coming up behind and to the side, signal, TURN YOUR HEAD AND LOOK, and if all's clear make your lane change and get on with life.
That's exactly the point I was making.

I was just horrified that someone could b e so traumatised by the loss of mirror vision that "he could have been killed". :)
 

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I can only say if you have every driven anything long, you will drive ONLY with mirrors. I trust my mirrors explicitly. On the bike I will glance but I never fully turn my head. You ever driven a RV, Tractor Trailer, Deuce and a Half with a 1/2 ton generator trailer on the rear?

Yes granted on a bike you are able to see by turning your head, but why would you, a quick glance if you even do that. If you are not scanning your mirrors you are not driving the way I was taught. I can see both in my side view and my convex mirrors all I need to see.

Each to their own, but I will live or die with my mirrors. 35 years of driving with a license and my mirrors have never lied to me yet.
 
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