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Firstly, since it doesn't appear to pivot at the bottom in any way I don't see how it can cause the gear lever to go up. Secondly the gear shift mechanism on the LT's is a known weak point and there is a danger that the force this would exert could exacerbate the weakness.
 

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Nice product, though it looks like it would stress the shifter lever.
 

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I'm with Highroamer. I, too, don't see a pivot point at the bottom of the lever. It seems to me, then, that the only way it can actually work is by twisting the factory shift lever and stressing it until it's forced upward into the next gear. Seems like a crappy design, to me.
 

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Dragonwing said:
I'm with Highroamer. I, too, don't see a pivot point at the bottom of the lever. It seems to me, then, that the only way it can actually work is by twisting the factory shift lever and stressing it until it's forced upward into the next gear. Seems like a crappy design, to me.

If you look at the picture the heel portion is well behind the fulcrum. Just imagine that the whole thing is solid with the fulcrum in the middle. The stresses will be close if not the same.

Robert
 

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I'm not feelin' it. The way I see it, with the fact that there's no fulcrum/pivot, pressure applied to the kickshift downward with the heel would serve only to push everything down, which is great for downshifts, but not much else.
 

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Dragonwing said:
I'm not feelin' it. The way I see it, with the fact that there's no fulcrum/pivot, pressure applied to the kickshift downward with the heel would serve only to push everything down, which is great for downshifts, but not much else.

OK, try this: Imagine a disk with a shaft mounted in the center. You can rotate the shaft from any point on the disk. Now imagine that you cut the disk so that you have a one inch ring supported by one spoke. You can still rotate the shaft with any part of the ring. Now imagine a cut in the ring next to the spoke. You can still rotate the shaft from any point on the ring. Does this clear it up or make it worse?

Robert
 

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Scouter-50 said:
If you look at the picture the heel portion is well behind the fulcrum. Just imagine that the whole thing is solid with the fulcrum in the middle. The stresses will be close if not the same.....
Bingo!

The distance from the heel plate to the center of rotation (the location bushing of the shift left behind the foot peg plate) isn't that much different than the distance from the toe shifter to the center of rotation, hence the leverage applied is about the same.

For those who can't picture how this works, imagine a steering wheel with only one spoke. It doesn't matter where you grab the wheel, you can grab the wheel at any point with one hand and still turn the steering column. And that one spoke on the steering wheel could be in the shape of a spiral, or be contorted in all kinds of different bends, and the end result would be the same.

It is the distance from the pivot point that determines the amount of leverage applied. The fact that the accessory heel shift is designed to pass under the footpeg makes no difference; it could have an even more circuitous path and still have the very same force applied as long as the pedal ends up the same distance from the pivot point.

This is a repeat discussion, read the last two posts in this thread:
http://www.bmwlt.com/forums/showthread.php?t=55395
 

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Dragonwing said:
I'm with Highroamer. I, too, don't see a pivot point at the bottom of the lever. It seems to me, then, that the only way it can actually work is by twisting the factory shift lever and stressing it until it's forced upward into the next gear. Seems like a crappy design, to me.
LOL, I had the same impression of the thing when I first saw a picture of it.
But the design is actually elegant in its simplicity. If you like chrome, the other option might suit you better, but there is a lot of unnecessary hardware. Compare:

Note how much less space is taken up by the "funny" looking shifter, the foot peg and toe shifter are encroached upon by the chrome shifter. The other one is neatly tucked out of the way, weighs less, has fewer parts, and works great.







 

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Got it! And now my brain hurts. Time for a 5:1 Martini. Up. Bleu cheese-stuffed olives. Yummm!
 

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I have the one shown in the bottom set of pics.....had it for almost 8 years now. No problem with the linkage.....but I have taken it apart and greased it (4 times) and replaced the foam pads (once). I had the "Police" heel/toe shifter on my Guzzi way back when, and LOVED it.

Pat
 

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I guess I'm a retard. :eek: I read through everyone's explanation, but I agree w/ Highroamer. It seems w/o a pivot point at the bend, then pressing down on the back side would just leave the front attachment point wanting to pull the shifter down. From the top view, it appears one would have to rotate their heel inward towards the bike in order to press down on the back of the lever. If it works, then more power to em. :clapping: The chrome version looks spiffy, though. :thumb:

I wonder if either would work w/ floorboards?
 

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bikerj said:
... I read through everyone's explanation, but I agree w/ Highroamer. It seems w/o a pivot point at the bend, then pressing down on the back side would just leave the front attachment point wanting to pull the shifter down.

I wonder if either would work w/ floorboards?
I think both types would work with floorboards, but you'd have to check the dimensions to make sure they'd fit. If you search the forum, I think you'll fine posts from folks who have done it.

As far as visualizing how the Touring Accessories kickshift works, maybe this will help. Remember, the pivot point of the toeshifter is behind the footpeg on the footpeg attachement plate. Then picture how a steering wheel works: Push down on the right side of a steering wheel and the steering column turns.
The pivot point of the shifter is directly analogous to the steering column; it is the axis of rotation.

Now picture: A steering wheel with only one spoke.
A steering wheel with a gap in the wheel... still works right?
Imagine an angular steering wheel rather than a round one, push down on the right side, the axis of rotation turns.
Now cut away those portions except that point where you are applying the downward force on the right side of the wheel; starting to look like the kickshifter?

 

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bikerj said:
.... From the top view, it appears one would have to rotate their heel inward towards the bike in order to press down on the back of the lever.....
This is true, I find I have to turn my heel inward to catch the heel shifter. Also, because I have the Suburban Machinery peg lowering kit, the heel shifter plate is relatively high. Sometimes I find that I turn my heel inward and catch the shifter arm rather than the plate itself. Actually this isn't anymore foot movement than what it takes to position the toe of the boot under the toe shifter.

This isn't really a "cruiser" type accessory like toe-heel shifters found on old Moto-Guzzis or HDs. The chrome one pictured in my earlier post comes closer to those I think. I find it works well, and when my arthritic big toe starts giving me pain, the heel shifter is really nice to have. It is simple, relatively cheap, and low profile on the bike.

Nice to have options.
 

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Seems like a neat little shifter arm, but I have to ask, how is it any easier than just using your toe? I just don’t see the advantage of something like this on these bikes?
 

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SteveW said:
Seems like a neat little shifter arm, but I have to ask, how is it any easier than just using your toe? I just don’t see the advantage of something like this on these bikes?
As I stated in the post just above your's: "I find it works well, and when my arthritic big toe starts giving me pain, the heel shifter is really nice to have."

Before I started having arthritis issues, I wondered why anyone would want a heel shifter too.

When I was camping in my youth, I used to scoff at folks who brought lawn chairs to a state park. Then after a few years I starting envying them.... and a few more years and I started bringing my own lawn chair. :histerica

I used to wonder why the heck anyone would "trike" a perfectly good motorcycle. Then when you begin to realize that knees, hips, etc. wear out, it makes perfect sense.
 

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I was just wondering if anybody out there has one those shifters;; the one on the top picture ;;
Thats mounted along with Darius Floorboards.
Gary
2003 K1200LT :bmw:
 

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I have one and cant say anything good or bad about it
My foot is only an 8.5 or 9 depending on the boot so I would kick it and sometimes its hit or miss. When I hit the kicker, it worked well
So the effort of picking my foot up and moving back was about the same a toe shifting, so I took it off
Add to that I sometimes ride my S83 without one made more of an effort to adjust from bike to bike
That being said it was put on the first summer I owned the LT and I wasn't real accustom to the Bike, so May try again this summer
 

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CharlieVT said:
As I stated in the post just above your's: "I find it works well, and when my arthritic big toe starts giving me pain, the heel shifter is really nice to have."

Before I started having arthritis issues, I wondered why anyone would want a heel shifter too.

When I was camping in my youth, I used to scoff at folks who brought lawn chairs to a state park. Then after a few years I starting envying them.... and a few more years and I started bringing my own lawn chair. :histerica

I used to wonder why the heck anyone would "trike" a perfectly good motorcycle. Then when you begin to realize that knees, hips, etc. wear out, it makes perfect sense.
It is interesting how events in our lives will change our perspectives! :)
 
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