BMW Luxury Touring Community banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Had a mishap on weekend when tipped it over at a set of lights when pulling up, with pillion on back. Over balanced and couldn't hold it up and gently, if that is possible layed her on the ground with the 2 of us

My normal stop method has always been left foot down and I haven't had an issue in the past. I think my foot may have slipped on some oil but the issue is I don't really know why it happened. No damage to bike or us.

The 2 helmet setting raises the bike up so that I really haven't a flat foot on landing and need to lean slightly to land.

I am asking what techniques people use to stop with Pillion especially the feet. (left the right), both?

Also the low front seat would this be and advantage as I am approx 5 10 in the old. Can you rife with Pilion on the 1 helmet setting?

Thanks

Any suggestions would help
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
545 Posts
Hi Mark, welcome to the forum. For whatever it's worth, I've noticed the difference in height when riding in the "two up" setting also. When I have two on board, if we're going out for a ride I'll leave it in "one-up" mode until I get to the edge of town where there won't be lots of stop & start. Around or near the last stop light/stop sign before we get out on the road, I'll change it to "two-up." The way I ride, particularly when two-up, I'm not pushing anything to the limits, seems fine to ride with the two of us (total 330# or less) in the one-up mode while briefly in town.

John
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,047 Posts
Mark - +1 on the welcome. You've come to the right place with a question like this.

My $0.02 worth is that pillion passenger or otherwise, I was taught that you always land with the left foot down to make sure your right foot is available to brake. In these days of integrated brakes maybe that's not as important, but I'm such an old fart that I always brake with both front and rear as if I didn't have the integrated brakes. The only exception to this is if I'm cross such a slope, and the left side is downhill, that I'd roll if I put the left foot down. But I'm really thinking about it because it is so counterintuitive to me.

After you stop you can put that second foot down to keep it straight up and down.

I am 6'0", 32" inseam (weight disproportionate) and wear boots with heels so I am able to flat foot with the stock seat in the high position. I can only imagine what it must be like to not be able to. But even then, seems to me that if you can only put one foot down, left is still the one to do.

I have tons of experience both riding tandem on a bicycle and 2-up on the motorbike so I understand how easy it is to get overcenter at a stop. Sounds like you did the best you could and let it go slowly, hope your passenger understands and is still riding with you. I've heard of several people getting themselves hurt trying to prevent what eventually becomes a tipover. Best to just stand away, let it ease down, and then formulate the plan to pick it up. Lots of us have done it.

And, speaking from experience, you don't have to have a passenger to get off balance and let it slide over ...

JayJay
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
76 Posts
Mark,

I am sorry to hear about the drop. It sounds like nobody was hurt or nothing was broken so in the end it is embarrassing and a learning experience. We have all had our share of those moments so don't sweat it too much. :(

I am also 5' 10" and have a 30" inseam and have the low seat set on the lowest position and still am not able to flat foot the RT, I am on the balls of my feet. So that being said, when I come to a stop I always have both feet down and based on the road surface use both if I can, but if I can't, I use the foot on the side that requires the least amount of lean to touch the road. I know when I took my riders course we were told to use the left foot, but I had a 2001 Triumph Trophy for 10 years that was taller, wider in the seat, and more top heavy than the RT and I found it easier to lean to the side that required less lean angle. I have been doing that for so long I do not even think of it any more.

Plus you always must keep an eye out for pot holes, gravel or other items that may cause a fall. My friend is over 6' with about a 33" - 34" inseam and he dropped his Ultra Glide when he slipped on some gravel when coming to a stop at an intersection.

I liked John's recommendation to leave the ESA set to one up and then change when you get out of town. I will adopt that approach myself.

Chris
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Thanks

Live the idea of the one helmet - will use that and I might go and purchase a "low seat" anyway to at least gain an inch.

Yes she will still ride with me as we head off in a couple of months around Australia, so she has to.

Thanks again
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top