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Discussion Starter #1
Today washing the bike I realized that the rear disk is a bit lose. If I grab it with thumb and finger at 9 o clock, I can play side to side about 1mm (don't think it's more then 1mm)
Then I check the front disk. One I can barely play, the other is solid.

Is there a maintenance that I have to do? Have you haver had it? How did you fix it?
I can't reach the screws that I think secure the rear disk, (see photo PS: the black stuff there is not oil, it's water) but they look tight. Do I have to remove the rear end to access that area and tight the screws? Or could be that the house of the disks are getting ready for a replacement?

The bike has 62K miles on it but I could not find any notes on the maintenance manual that we should tight those screws regularly.

Thank you
 

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there are a zillion threads on the rear rattlin floatin disk... allot of these guys fix it by spending money on new parts. The problem is it is a floating disk and the "rivets" that secure it become a little wollard out, thus the play and cowbell sound. I removed the rear tire (2min) and ran a bead of high temp silicone allthe way around in the gap using the end of a small zip tie. You could use a tooth pic or whatever, the trick is to make sure the disk is all the way to the right while you apply the silicone. I let set overnight reinstalled the tire and have been riding at high temp/speeds since without another issue. Very inexpensive thus far reliable fix... ;)
But get ready for the thats too simple you must replace, replace, replace sermon(s)... :p
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Mark, thank you for pointing that.
I've read those 'noise rear brakes' threads, but maybe I didn't interpreted it well. I was under the impression that the noise and the fix were from the pads+caliper, not from the disk it self.

Your fix sounds terrific and if it works (I'm not saying its not, I mean works for me) that would be a really easy one.
Would you do the same on the front disk?

Also, what do you mean: "the trick is to make sure the disk is all the way to the right while you apply the silicone" ?
right towards the rear end ? So you mean that you put the silicon from the left (the wheel side) pressing against the rear end. Is that right?

Like a view from the back towards front of the bike:

Tire -- disk -- rear and

You press the disk this way -->
and apply silicone on the left side of the disk screws/rivets is that right?


I'm amazing that on 62K miles I never play with the disk it self.. probably it was like that for quite while...
 

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There are, traditionally, two different rear brake noise issues.

1. The Cow Bell
2. The Squeal

The cow bell is caused by the retention rivets and their anti-rattle springs wearing allowing the disk to be too free on it's carrier.

The squeal is caused by the interaction of the pads with the disk. Many have had good luck fixing the squeal by following a proper Bedding in Procedure.

The OEM rotor will eventually loose the springs or spring strength needed to keep the floating disk from rattling. I don't know if it's a universal problem - but it's common enough to beg the question. It's a weak design and several have applied 'band-aid' fixes by replacing the rotor with another OEM rotor ($$), RTV silicon and other gap fillers and I've heard of some attempting to replace the retention springs.

Those of us that don't want a known weakness on our bikes or the need to go back and re-apply band-aids at a later date have installed a 3rd party rotor with a MUCH better retention design. The 3rd party rotor is also quite a bit lighter than the OEM. Not really a concern for most. Also, it's significantly less expensive than the OEM rotor.

I did the Bedding in Procedure when I installed my new rotor and pads and haven't had any noises from the rear end for over a year now (14k+ miles). So many others have had good success with getting rid of the squeal without a new rotor, I'm beginning to think the squeal would've been eliminated just by the Bedding in (I needed a rotor anyway due to excessive wear). But now I also know I'll never have to ever worry about some bovine neck ware ever following me around. Just another possible problem that's not on my list anymore.
 

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strsout said:
Today washing the bike I realized that the rear disk is a bit lose. If I grab it with thumb and finger at 9 o clock, I can play side to side about 1mm (don't think it's more then 1mm)
Then I check the front disk. One I can barely play, the other is solid.

Is there a maintenance that I have to do? Have you haver had it? How did you fix it?
I can't reach the screws that I think secure the rear disk, (see photo PS: the black stuff there is not oil, it's water) but they look tight. Do I have to remove the rear end to access that area and tight the screws? Or could be that the house of the disks are getting ready for a replacement?

The bike has 62K miles on it but I could not find any notes on the maintenance manual that we should tight those screws regularly.

Thank you

"A cowbell sound from the rear brake disc, oh, it's supposed to be that way, it's a 'floating' disc!" (Quote from a BMW "Mechanic"). :histerica

"Floating yes....rattling and so loose it sounds like a cowbell??? NOT!

The joys of dealing with motorcycles!
 

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BMW dealers and mechanics

You ever get the feeling that these guys are a bunch of liars? Is that a prerequisite for employment at a dealer?....hmmmmmmmm...... :D
 

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PHP:
Mark, thank you for pointing that.
I've read those 'noise rear brakes' threads, but maybe I didn't interpreted it well. I was under the impression that the noise and the fix were from the pads+caliper, not from the disk it self.

Your fix sounds terrific and if it works (I'm not saying its not, I mean works for me) that would be a really easy one.
Would you do the same on the front disk?

Also, what do you mean: "the trick is to make sure the disk is all the way to the right while you apply the silicone" ?
right towards the rear end ? So you mean that you put the silicon from the left (the wheel side) pressing against the rear end. Is that right?

Like a view from the back towards front of the bike:

Tire -- disk -- rear and

You press the disk this way -->
and apply silicone on the left side of the disk screws/rivets is that right?


I'm amazing that on 62K miles I never play with the disk it self.. probably it was like that for quite while...

On the gap/cowbell noise;
yes, as you are looking to front from the rear...the gap is then filled from the left side as you turn the hub. Make sure to sqeeze some thru to the other side towards the rivet heads. Just got back from a ride and checked it again on center stand...rotor still has a little float in it which is what i expected with the silicone being a plyable material when dry. Almost like an o ring. I also embeded my brakes a while back after reading about the squeel/fix on this site. My pads are the original and the embedding still worked. No more squeel either. I didnt have to buy pads, rotor, new tools or build another special garage to fix the noises. :p
I have an 03' F350 that has a rattle in my dash...thought about fixing it but i would gladly replace if someone would send me a new one :rolleyes: ....still researching to determine if the rattlin dash is a "known weakness" or just a wearable part. :histerica :histerica
 
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