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Discussion Starter #1
I'm in the middle of installing Ohlins shocks on my 02 LT. The rear one was a snap to put in, but the front was a lot more complicated as I had to take apart the joint where the A-arm connects to the slider tube fork bridge. I had to heat that nut to remove it as it was loctited. The manual calls for Loctite 2701 on re-assembly which I am still trying to find out about. Anybody familiar with that? I have some red #271 and some green which I don't know the number of and some blue which I think might be #243, which I don't think would be suitable for this application. Would either the red or the green that I have be suitable for this? While checking about Loctite on the web, I did come across a motorcyle application guide for Loctite which may be quite handy but it did not really mention the application I need.
http://www.henkelna.com/us/content_data/LT4460_Motorcycle_Application_Guide.pdf
 

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Wrencher Extraordinaire
2005 K1200LT
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13,909 Posts
Green loctite is good for this application.

I was changing a front tire when I installed my Ohlins and I found you could slide the forks down far enough to swap the shock if you unbolted the brake line hardware from the forks. I did not want to mess with that ball joint. Don't know if it is worth it if you didn't already have the front wheel off.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I don't know how you did it because I still had a hard time getting it in there with the way I did it. I had to lower that A-arm as much as possible and the radiator hose was in the way. I had to use a lever to finally get it in. Did you have the shock compressed some how?
 

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Wrencher Extraordinaire
2005 K1200LT
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Nope. I don't remember the hose interference, but it was a bit of a puzzel. Had to hold it just right to get the old out and the new in. The key is to remove the rubber donut on top of the shock first before you try to remove the lower part from the arm. That is the only way I could get it to clear. Reverse the procedure for install - shock in first then add the rubber donut.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I still don't know how you did it because that A-arm would not go low enough without removing the bolt for the ball joint there. That was not that much of a problem though. I had more trouble getting out a bolt holding the brake line to the fork as the allen head stripped out trying to remove it and I had to use vise grips to get it out. It was a real pain as it is hard to get at.
 

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Wrencher Extraordinaire
2005 K1200LT
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Guess I got lucky, I do remember cursing at it a few times and it was Dec of 06 when I did it so I may have forgotten a few things. I also had no trouble with the bolts on the brake line supports (that is always a big help when all fasteners work like they are supposed to).

The other thing I did wrong was during the pre-load set up I got screwed up on my measurements and was way off. Took about 30 minutes just to get it back to the starting point as there is not a lot of room for the spanner wrench in there. Measure twice - set once! Then go ride and enjoy the new shocks.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
What's that about set up? I thought they came set up from the factory as the guy at Kyle Racing where I bought mine asked my weight and whether I rode solo most of the time or not and if I travelled with luggage. Hopefully they're ready to go.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I was going by the Clymer manual's procedure. I still don't see how it would be possible to do that without doing what I did. What year is your bike?
 

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Mine was a 2000, but I've done newer. The trick is the rubber donut.

Removing the calipers, front tire and jacking the bike up causes the forks to drop lower. Removing the rubber donut allows you to stick the long bolt on top of the shock thru the shock tower a greater distance. It clears the bottom fitting. Now, putting the rubber donut back on isn't exactly a picnic, but it's a helluva lot easier than taking the ball joint apart.



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Discussion Starter #11
I probably would have tried it that way had I known about it, but it really wasn't that much extra work to get the ball joint apart. Just had to apply a little heat. I guess I'll use the green loctite in re-assembling it.
 

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2005 K1200LT
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tonyn1 said:
What's that about set up? I thought they came set up from the factory as the guy at Kyle Racing where I bought mine asked my weight and whether I rode solo most of the time or not and if I travelled with luggage. Hopefully they're ready to go.
Mine probably was set OK but I read the paper that came with the shocks. Said to measure the height with no load, then measure the height with me on board. Then to set the "sag" distance to some value. That is where I messed up the pre load and had to start over. I would just ride it.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Yea, I think that's the best course of action as the only adjustment seems to be the preload anyway and the rear has the remote adjuster if I need to use that.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I've demo-ed a GT before with ESA and it is nice. I was thinking of getting a GT before, but since I've put some money in my LT now, I think I'll wait a while on getting something new. I'm wondering what the next generation LT would look like. Anybody have any info on that? I would assume they would use the GT engine.
 
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