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I just got my 2001 K1200lt Final Drive rebuilt by Bombars Beemers in North Carolina, www.bombarsbeemers.com 919-450-7450
they did a great job and now installed my bike it feels like new when twisting the throttle on. Cost for repair with shipping $907us (mine was a total re-build) could be lower. Just wanted to put this out there for other people that end up in my spot down the road wondering what to do or where to go for a repair job.
 

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I just got my 2001 K1200lt Final Drive rebuilt by Bombars Beemers in North Carolina, Home 919-450-7450
they did a great job and now installed my bike it feels like new when twisting the throttle on. Cost for repair with shipping $907us (mine was a total re-build) could be lower. Just wanted to put this out there for other people that end up in my spot down the road wondering what to do or where to go for a repair job.
I hope it serves you well.

For anyone else looking for final drive repair, on this site, Saddleman (Dave in NC), is the guy to go to.

I'm pretty sure Dave would have been cheaper, and no one is more knowledgeable or meticulous in rebuilding K1200LT final drives.

Much information about final drive failure and repair on this site, but unfortunately newcomers don't see that info without effort in searching the old threads.
 

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My '01 has almost 21,000, should I consider finding a second drive and having it rebuilt so when I do have this issue I will have a swap? Any advice on this?
 

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I just got my 2001 K1200lt Final Drive rebuilt by Bombars Beemers in North Carolina, Home 919-450-7450
they did a great job and now installed my bike it feels like new when twisting the throttle on. Cost for repair with shipping $907us (mine was a total re-build) could be lower. Just wanted to put this out there for other people that end up in my spot down the road wondering what to do or where to go for a repair job.
Rather pricey. I had Tom Cutter rebuild mine, pinion seal, large bearing and seal, set proper preload, etc. I forget exact price, but I think $600 or so. I later found that Saddleman would do it for probably less than that
 

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My '01 has almost 21,000, should I consider finding a second drive and having it rebuilt so when I do have this issue I will have a swap? Any advice on this?
I did my own crown bearing as a preemptive strike and what I found was it was close to .2mm over shimmed so it would have failed me in time. I did not do anything else at that time but I do have a picture of my pinion and I believe I can see the creeping roller race issue.

Since I do not have the skills of Dave ( Saddleman ) I bought a cheap one off flebay and pulled it apart completely, making the proper holding jig and modifying tools to be able to properly disassemble and reassemble it. What I found was the bearings and races were all in good shape and all the shimming was optimal. This is possibly one Dave did for someone else that found its way to me but I have no way of telling other than it is all set up properly. Even so, it is my goto spare as nothing was replaced in it other than the pinion seal as there were signs of a leak there but the oil could have come from anywhere after it was removed from the bike and sold to me.

You can get them fairly cheap but without a proper inspection, you have no real way of telling if it will last. You could do it 2 ways if you really want a spare and don't have the tools to rebuild one yourself which I don't recommend now that I have done one unless you have the proper skills and knowledge. I am a tinkerer so it was a learning experience for me to see if I could do it.

If you have a no riding season, pull it and ship it to Dave and save the several hundred on the second one, or keep riding and get a spare and have it rebuilt for the eventuality of a FD failure that may or may not happen any time soon. I have heard that Dave has had some available at times so you might ask him about it.

Now for the advice. Keep the oil changed in your FD and check often for any rear wheel play that can not be traced to the pivot bearings and ride it. If you really want a spare, buy one and send it to Dave or get it from him directly if he has any to spare.
 
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My '01 has almost 21,000, should I consider finding a second drive and having it rebuilt so when I do have this issue I will have a swap? Any advice on this?
I shipped mine to Dave two years ago before I had a problem It was a little off shim Now on trips with one less thing to think about
 

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My '01 has almost 21,000, should I consider finding a second drive and having it rebuilt so when I do have this issue I will have a swap? Any advice on this?
What I would do:
If planning any long distance riding, I'd have Saddleman rebuild it during the off season. I'd consider it road insurance.

If only riding locally, (not worried about interupting a vacation or trip far from home) and I had access to a trailer, or a road insurance plan, I might just change the gear lube in the final drive ever 3-6 thousand miles (doing with every crankcase oil change is a good way to keep track of it). Look for shiney metal flakes or increasing amounts of grey fuzz on the drain magnet at lube changes.

While I don't have any valid statistics, after doing more than 50 rebuilds, it seems that early bikes like yours fail most often somewhere between 20 and 40K miles.
 

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2005 K1200LT
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Either pre-emptive rebuild or just buy a big bearing and carry a few tools with you on your next long trip. See my post on field repair of a rear drive ON the bike without dealer support here. There is always a machine shop in just about every town so there is no reason to pay a huge tow and repair bill. This should get you back on the road in less than 12 hours.
 

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Either pre-emptive rebuild or just buy a big bearing and carry a few tools with you on your next long trip. See my post on field repair of a rear drive ON the bike without dealer support here. There is always a machine shop in just about every town so there is no reason to pay a huge tow and repair bill. This should get you back on the road in less than 12 hours.
This is a really good option, thanks for the reminder of this approach, John.
I rode with a spare crownwheel bearing in my side case for years. I used to joke that carrying a spare crownwheel bearing will impart such good karma over the bike that a failure would never occur anyway. ;)

If someone is going to carry a spare bearing as road insurance, as noted in John's exellent description of the procedure, a preemptive loosening and retightening the brake rotor fasteners prior to the big trip just to ensure it can be done without difficulty.

I have found that in many cases getting the brake rotor off the final drive can be difficult even on the work bench. Because of the Loctitte and corrosion, heat and an impact driver have been needed, and in some cases the hex wrench will strip out the fasteners requiring additional tools.
 

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Wrencher Extraordinaire
2005 K1200LT
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Curtis you are correct as I have had issues with several of those pesky screws. They are only on there to hold the disc in place when you remove the wheel so I agree they should be removed and reinstalled loosely at the next tire change.
 
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