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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi have a k1200lt 2000 model having problems getting it on the center stand reversed it onto some timber when finally got it on the center stand my back wheel is about 4 inches above the ground. I just bought the bike so don't know much about it but if it has been lowered would this be the problem will i need to get a new back shock
Sorry bit long and drawn out
Cheers Gordon
 

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When I bought my 05 it had a manual center stand fitted. It was difficult at first but you get the hang of it. It takes a certain technique. I used to grab hold of the left panier grab handle with my right hand and the left handlebar grip in my left hand. Position you body so your left leg is directly above the center stand lever. Place your left foot on the center stand lever. You need to force all your body weight straight down through your left leg at the exact same time you lift sharply upwards with your right hand on the grab handle and guide backwards with your left hand on the handlebar. it needs to be coordinated as one smooth flowing movement. if your rear shock adjuster is still functioning adjust it for a bit more preload. This should make the transition onto the stand a bit easier.
 

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This video from Curt Johnson on K1200LT tips and tricks shows how to get the bike on the center stand and also how to stand it up when on the ground. The last segment shows his wife lifting it on the center stand. There are about 2 dozen other youtube videos by Curt (and others) that I found incredibly well done and informative when I first bought my LT a few months ago.

Dave

 

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Note that KLTs with manual center stand have a grab handle strategically placed so that standing with your right hand on the handle and your right hip next to it, as you flex your right leg and pull upward with your arm the two forces combine to make rocking it onto stand a cinch (once you get the hang of it.) Good idea to have someone aft to steady it while you practice. Sitting on the stand, the front wheel is on the ground, so condition of rear shock shouldn't have much effect on how much effort it takes. I got to where I could do it barefooted.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks guys have watched the videos they make it look easy but there back wheel is not so high off the ground when on the stand as mine is 4 inches or 100 mm is that normal as i have only got the bike have not ridden it yet wondering if front shock is stuffed or back one has a shorter shock to lower it on
Note that KLTs with manual center stand have a grab handle strategically placed so that standing with your right hand on the handle and your right hip next to it, as you flex your right leg and pull upward with your arm the two forces combine to make rocking it onto stand a cinch (once you get the hang of it.) Good idea to have someone aft to steady it while you practice. Sitting on the stand, the front wheel is on the ground, so condition of rear shock shouldn't have much effect on how much effort it takes. I got to where I could do it barefooted.
Note that KLTs with manual center stand have a grab handle strategically placed so that standing with your right hand on the handle and your right hip next to it, as you flex your right leg and pull upward with your arm the two forces combine to make rocking it onto stand a cinch (once you get the hang of it.) Good idea to have someone aft to steady it while you practice. Sitting on the stand, the front wheel is on the ground, so condition of rear shock shouldn't have much effect on how much effort it takes. I got to where I could do it barefooted.
This video from Curt Johnson on K1200LT tips and tricks shows how to get the bike on the center stand and also how to stand it up when on the ground. The last segment shows his wife lifting it on the center stand. There are about 2 dozen other youtube videos by Curt (and others) that I found incredibly well done and informative when I first bought my LT a few months ago.

Dave

Hi dave thanks for that have checked it out but all the bikes on the center stand the front wheel is on the ground and back one is nearly touching the ground my back wheel is about 4 inches from the ground and also i noticed the front of the center stand feet were its rounds up is all ground away so things it has shorter shocks on it
Cheers Gordon
 

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2005 K1200LT
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Best way to tell if you have short shocks is measure the distance to the ground from the center of the pivot bolt on the center stand while holding the bike upright (need a helper). It should be 6.5 inches. If it is less than that it will be a struggle to get it on the stand.
 
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My .02 is swap in a manual/mechanical center stand as soon as you can. The electric/hydro is a lost cause; the rebuild is a pain but even if you get it rebuilt the thing still doesn’t like anything but near perfect conditions. (If you’re on even the slightest slope the electric won’t play ball, and when it doesn’t play ball you can’t manually put it on the center stand, you’ll have to use the side stand.)

I swapped mine out (got a used center stand off of Craigs for about $75), and now I am in charge of when I can and cannot use the center stand. I have zero zero zero regrets (did I say zero?)
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
My .02 is swap in a manual/mechanical center stand as soon as you can. The electric/hydro is a lost cause; the rebuild is a pain but even if you get it rebuilt the thing still doesn’t like anything but near perfect conditions. (If you’re on even the slightest slope the electric won’t play ball, and when it doesn’t play ball you can’t manually put it on the center stand, you’ll have to use the side stand.)

I swapped mine out (got a used center stand off of Craigs for about $75), and now I am in charge of when I can and cannot use the center stand. I have zero zero zero regrets (did I say zero?)
Thanks I've checked the back shock it's a shorter one so I'm going to modify my center stand thanks all for your info
Much appreciated
Cheers Gordon
 

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My .02 is swap in a manual/mechanical center stand as soon as you can. The electric/hydro is a lost cause; the rebuild is a pain but even if you get it rebuilt the thing still doesn’t like anything but near perfect conditions. (If you’re on even the slightest slope the electric won’t play ball, and when it doesn’t play ball you can’t manually put it on the center stand, you’ll have to use the side stand.)

I swapped mine out (got a used center stand off of Craigs for about $75), and now I am in charge of when I can and cannot use the center stand. I have zero zero zero regrets (did I say zero?)
It's by no means a lost cause, you just have to rebuild it correctly. A center stand is never meant to be used on a slope anyway. I rebuilt mine about 4 years ago and it hasn't let me down since then.
 

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It's by no means a lost cause, you just have to rebuild it correctly. A center stand is never meant to be used on a slope anyway. I rebuilt mine about 4 years ago and it hasn't let me down since then.
I totally agree ,an electric centre stand is one of the best features on this motorcycle and certainly saves the rider carrying blocks of timber around to put below the rear wheel in order to get their machines on the cheaper manual central centre stand
 

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Note that KLTs with manual center stand have a grab handle strategically placed so that standing with your right hand on the handle and your right hip next to it, as you flex your right leg and pull upward with your arm the two forces combine to make rocking it onto stand a cinch (once you get the hang of it.) Good idea to have someone aft to steady it while you practice. Sitting on the stand, the front wheel is on the ground, so condition of rear shock shouldn't have much effect on how much effort it takes. I got to where I could do it barefooted.
I find the grab handle a bit too low.I just use the saddlebag handleLoosing the rear trunk helped the cause too.lol.Bike handles much better also.
 

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I actually have the exact opposite problem. When I place it on the center stand, there’s zero clearance between the rear wheel and the ground, which makes me nervous because I feel like the bike will fall back forward. I recently installed hyperpro springs on stock shocks. Last night I refilled the preload adjuster with fresh jack oil and cranked up the preload all the way, but no difference whatsoever. Also when I go over rough asphalt or bumps, I get a pretty good butt slap. I’m suspecting that my rear shock is toast. Can anyone confirm that before I get another used shock and swap the spring on it? Thank you all!
 

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It is the shock length not the spring that determines the bottom limit of suspension travel. Check to make sure one or the other end points of the shock are not coming loose. The bottom yoke does have a jam nut and threads on it.

Preload will only set where the suspension sits with weight on wheels.
 
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It is the shock length not the spring that determines the bottom limit of suspension travel. Check to make sure one or the other end points of the shock are not coming loose. The bottom yoke does have a jam nut and threads on it.

Preload will only set where the suspension sits with weight on wheels.
Thank you John! You’re right as always. I just checked and the bottom part of the shock is completely out of the threads. Makes me cringe a little since I was pushing hard through the twisties last weekend without knowing what I know now. Ouch! Thank you again!!!
 
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