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Discussion Starter #1
I pick up my new 05 1200LT this coming Thursday and will be driving it 80 miles from N. Atlanta to the N. Georgia mountains. I use to own a 1200CLC and was use to its top heavy weight and got so use to it I could turn on a dime.
On the CLC I used the front brake and rarely used the back break. Dont remember ever using the back brake and had no tip over problems at all. Coming to a slow or fast stop was easy. On the LT what should I do that would be different?
I have read conflicting info. Just like the CLC I do know the importance of keeping the wheel squared when coming to a stop. So is rear or front the primary used brake in stopping? Any help would be great.
Thanks
 

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Dont change a thing. Front brake is your primary. I rarely use the rear, when Im two up I use it a little. But the Lt also has both brakes on either way.
Im not going to start the thing with linked brakes!! I dont want to go there.
I use front brake.



Zeke
 

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Zeke said:
Dont change a thing. Front brake is your primary. I rarely use the rear, when Im two up I use it a little. But the Lt also has both brakes on either way.
Im not going to start the thing with linked brakes!! I dont want to go there. I use front brake.Zeke
+1 :thumb:
 

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You should use both brakes for stopping. Typical 30% rear and 70% is the stopping power. This can change on depending on model of motorcycle. In average it is 70/30, so it would be important to use both.

For slow u-turns in parking lot etc........I use the rear brake to keep my balance, rarely the front.
 

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When riding an LT, I adhere to the "15 mph rule".
  • Over 15 mph, ALL front lever.
  • Under 15 mph, ALL rear brake pedal.
Simple.

With the LT's full-integral brakes, applying all front lever over 15 mph works really well, because the braking system will aplly rear braking as it sees fit.

One word of caution: Applying front brakes while turning slowly is a real sure way of dumping the bike. And once an LT decides to go down for a nap, you ain't stopping it.

Enjoy the N. GA mountains. I've run them a lot. Absolutely love that part of the country. :)
 

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messenger13 said:
When riding an LT, I adhere to the "15 mph rule".
  • Over 15 mph, ALL front lever.
  • Under 15 mph, ALL rear brake pedal.
Simple.

With the LT's full-integral brakes, applying all front lever over 15 mph works really well, because the braking system will aplly rear braking as it sees fit.

One word of caution: Applying front brakes while turning slowly is a real sure way of dumping the bike. And once an LT decides to go down for a nap, you ain't stopping it.
EXACTLY!!!

This opinion comes from 30 years of riding and then getting an LT last summer.

First of all, I'd say the definitive answer is from Motorman587 as he sells a DVD which explains this all - and shows it in great detail. I learned the right way from his video -which I watched AFTER dumping my LT on the 2nd day.

Secondly is the reason WHY I dropped it. I stopped behind 2 cars at a stop sign. I was the only one wanting to turn right. I slowly slipped between the two stopped cars and the sidewalk. Then, with my wheel turned at a 45 degree angle, I hit the front brake (at about 2 mph). The bike went down faster than 2 mph.

I came back and read this board and watched motorman's dvd. Then I drove around the Grand Canyon 2 up without incident. What did I learn? NEVER use your front brake when going slow. I can't imagine everyone here doesn't say that. And always have the front wheel straight when stopping.

I practice driving slow and stopping over and over using the rear brake ONLY.

NOT NECESSARY on a bike as big as my ZX-12R, which I have been driving for years without a hint of wanting to tip over - and I commute in L.A. traffic (and split lanes) on this bike so that's all stop and go.

My $.02
 

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I use both front and rear for all of my riding...
I love to stop.
If you get used to using both front and rear, you will be better prepared to keep the bike under control when you really need to stop!

As for the LT the link brakes are better than the linked on my VFR.
 

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mrbiker said:
EXACTLY!!!

First of all, I'd say the definitive answer is from Motorman587 as he sells a DVD which explains this all - and shows it in great detail. I learned the right way from his video -which I watched AFTER dumping my LT on the 2nd day.
I came back and read this board and watched motorman's dvd.

I didn't know Motorman587 had a dvd. Where can I get it?

Ray
 

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Arby60 said:
mrbiker said:
EXACTLY!!! ...I didn't know Motorman587 had a dvd. Where can I get it? Ray
That's a different "motorman" (I think his name is Jerry Palladino) from "our" motorman (who is John in FL).

- Bob
 

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I am lucky enough to own and ride two bikes. I use the same braking technique on both; mostly front with a bit of rear. At parking lot speeds, I use only rear on both.
 

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Here's a link to his video page. The one video talks a lot about the "friction zone" which I think answers some of the questions on another thread about the clutch on LEO BMW's and their 17-second concerns.

http://ridelikeapro.com/html/videos.htm
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks to all for the reply. I have ordered the DVD. I guess its time to learn and practice the right method of braking. I really prefer not dropping it on the first day. Second day- oh well we will see. I dropped my CLC the second day. Of course that was coming out of the barn where it was parked and driving it up a horse pasture and bringing it to a stop on gravel on a hill using the front brake only. Never dropped again though. Learned to respect it that day. Again thanks for all the suggestions and help.
 

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Muscle memory is important when you need to exercise your quick stop technique. My '99 does have ABS and not integrated or linked brakes; taking into account 70% comes from the front brake, should I need 100% braking effectiveness, I will have to apply the rear brake. ABS may increase the braking distance should a skid occur, but practicing the quick stop technique while using both brakes will help to avoid a front/rear tire skid/ABS activation and make 100% braking effectiveness available.

For those with linked brakes, I do not know, for example, if you squeeze the front brake only for a quick stop, how much rear brake is being applied? If it's less than 30% (given 70% stopping power comes from the front brake), I would use both brakes.

Just my $0.02
 

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hifiman said:
I pick up my new 05 1200LT this coming Thursday and will be driving it 80 miles from N. Atlanta to the N. Georgia mountains.
BE Carefull up here with the LT till you get used to it,
I live here ride these roads all the time, have seen my share af accidents even a couple lt's

Brake before your curve!!, you can use both brakes on that bike fine BEFORE your curve!

if you go in the curve hot, press the handle bar the way you want to go NOW! and look THROUGH that curve, if it drags (which it will if your hot) do not let it scare you!!! press that handle bar and let her lean into that curve
STAY in your LANE! there are far too many head on hits up here and that lt can trick you if you are not used to it.

If it has the driver foot board lowering pegs on it, TAKE THEM OFF before you come up here, tighten up your rear suspension as well (raiseing the rear some) you have the power center stand (right?) and it will drag

remember press right go right, press left go left,

It is a different beast up here, and we still have gravel on the roads in most corners!

stay off your REAR brake in the curves! it can stand the bike up and you can go right off the road, unless of course you are a real experienced rider, but then you wouldn't be asking for pointers on it.

that said, if ya like, give me a holler, I should be able to get away for a bit on thursday or friday for a while to ride, we can meet somewhere around Dahlonega (I live past dahlonega) I'd be glad to have a drink with ya or lunch or something

[email protected] and we can swap teles

Tom
 

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motorman587 said:
You should use both brakes for stopping. Typical 30% rear and 70% is the stopping power. This can change on depending on model of motorcycle. In average it is 70/30, so it would be important to use both.

For slow u-turns in parking lot etc........I use the rear brake to keep my balance, rarely the front.
correct, but rememeber he is bringing the lt to switch back heaven for the first time,
Stay off that rear brake in the curves!
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Thanks. I road quite a bit on my CLC in the mountains and had no problem on the curves. Great riding there. I imagine the LT will handle differently but Im sure I will be fine as long as I get to know the bike and take it easy until I get use to it. The CLC is not a small bike either and is quite top heavy as well.
Just a 100lbs lighter. Of course I wont be riding 2 up on this bike for while.
 

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wacolt said:
For those with linked brakes, I do not know, for example, if you squeeze the front brake only for a quick stop, how much rear brake is being applied? If it's less than 30% (given 70% stopping power comes from the front brake), I would use both brakes.
I too would like to know the concise answer for this question for my 2005 K1200LT. Is it a simple proportional distribution of front/rear pad pressures up to the point of any single wheel lockup? Or what is it? Are there two separate anti-lockup systems I assume?
 

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hifiman said:
Thanks. I road quite a bit on my CLC in the mountains and had no problem on the curves. Great riding there. I imagine the LT will handle differently but Im sure I will be fine as long as I get to know the bike and take it easy until I get use to it. The CLC is not a small bike either and is quite top heavy as well.
Just a 100lbs lighter. Of course I wont be riding 2 up on this bike for while.

you asked, enjoy the ride, if ya feel like it holler, I'm here all week.

I will probably be riding my gsa though as the lt is on the lift getting serviced and some of my gadgets removed as I have time.

Tom
 

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hifiman said:
Thanks. I road quite a bit on my CLC in the mountains and had no problem on the curves. Great riding there. I imagine the LT will handle differently but Im sure I will be fine as long as I get to know the bike and take it easy until I get use to it. The CLC is not a small bike either and is quite top heavy as well.
Just a 100lbs lighter. Of course I wont be riding 2 up on this bike for while.

I should have added, keep the rpms up at 4k rpm and higher, it helps the big beast tremendously , it really likes it 5krpm min on the grades and curves. it doesn't mean you have to ride faster just in a lower gear. it is not he boxer engine for sure!
 
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