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Discussion Starter #1
I have a 2000 k1200lt w/ABS and a bad front brake line (pin hole leaking fluid).

The guys at the local shop tell me that they allocate 3 hours for bleeding the lines! Really?

If the K1200 is similar to the R1200 series, I can't see where this is a very long process. I assume the procedures are similar.

Besides taking off the Tupperware, do I have to take the gas take off too in order to get to the ABS pump? Besides bleeding at the calipers and ABS pump, are there other places that I need to bleed the lines?
 

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No need to take the tank off. The abs is next to the battery on the right side. Should take no more than an hour. There is info in this forum of exactly which bleed screws do what. Do a search under maintenance.Be careful with the pump on, the fluid will go out FAST. This site saved me a few times.
are you replacing the line yourself? You will be fine.
Good Luck.

Zeke
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Yes, I am going to replace this line myself.

Good to know that I don't have to remove the gas tank.

The online article that I saw on this site talked about letting the ABS pump fluid from a pint jar through the system instead of using a speed bleeder, but that was for a later model - don't know if that would work for my 2000.
 

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GaryEdgar said:
The online article that I saw on this site talked about letting the ABS pump fluid from a pint jar through the system instead of using a speed bleeder, but that was for a later model - don't know if that would work for my 2000.
Gary, there is no ABS pump on our LTs. Just simple front reservoir to front calipers, rear reservoir to rear calipers. Since you aren't going to be draining the system, you shouldn't need to bleed the ABS unit. That said, if it hasn't been done, you might want to bleed the fluid from the unit just to have new fluid in it too. A brake flush gets the fluid through the lines and nearly all of the ABS unit. The fluid by the bleeders doesn't get turned over, so no harm in pushing it out occasionally.
 

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When I did mine because of the same reason I just bled the brakes from the front caliper and it worked just fine. I didn't need to touch the abs unit.
 

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In May of 2008, my ABS lights began flashing. Using an analog meter, I found the cause to be ABS unit failure. I had bled the lines in the fall, but not the unit itself. Trying to stop the flashing, I bled the lines again. The fluid coming out of the calipers was clean. I bled the ABS unit and very brown fluid came out for the first few lever squeezes and pedal pumps. The LT shop manual says the ABS unit doesn't need to be bled unless it's been opened or drained. My experience was that some fluid remains and gets very dark. I guess that's why the shop manual recommends pushing the calipers back, installing pucks in place of the pads, then bleeding. It gets all the old fluid out of the calipers.
 

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Gary,

I have replaced the front brake lines on two LTs; '99 and '00. As the others have told you, we do not have the ABS pump like the 02s and newer do. Simply pour the DOT 4 (not synthetic!) into the reservoir and bleed out the caliper bleed screw. If you have the patience of Job you don't even need to remove any Tupperware but the front line is a bear to get to. It can be done, but it's your call. I absolutely abhor taking Tupperware off the bike so I did it once with it all in place.

Since you're at it, I would really recommend just going ahead and pulling all the Tupperware and replacing all the brake lines with stainless steel lines. You'll be really surprised at how much better your brakes work. Seems like the more I ride the better the brakes are getting.
 
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pushin9s said:
Gary,

. Simply pour the DOT 4 (not synthetic!) into the reservoir and bleed out the caliper bleed screw.
All DOT 4 now is synthetic. I think you had the warning confused with DOT5 which is Silicone. That is a no no.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Ok, just wanted to follow up on the results.

I got the new brake line from the dealership and started in on this job. In order to get to the ABS pump, I had to take the Tupperware off of the right side. Getting the old line off and the new line in was pretty straight forward. It took longer for me to get the safety caps off of the calipers so I could install the new speed bleeders (loc tight was holding strong!).

After everything was in place, I filled up the reservoir and started bleeding the right side. After a little work, I moved over to the other side and did the same thing while adding more fluid to the reservoir as needed. I did this a few times until I got a clean fluid to come through with no bubbles.

All of this took less then 3 hours, including the taking the Tupperware off/on, replacing safety caps with bleeders, replacing the line, and bleeding the lines.

There was no need to bleed the pump on this model.
 

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Can anybody point me to a supplier for steel braided lines for a 1999 K1200LT.
I can't seem to locate an online supplier.
Regards,
Kelly
 

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Good God Yall....

Any local hydraulic shop can build you a stainless steel line...
And for half what the big boys charge.. And a quarter of what BMW charges..

John
 

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http://www.spieglerusa.com/cfm/brakelines.cfm

When my 00 sprung a leak I ordered from these people based upon what I read on this site.

My LT is my only vehicle. After riding choppers for many years, with no front brake, I knew I could I safely bring one brake line in to be built locally.

But, I only wanted to take my bike apart one time to install new lines.

Best from Tucson
Bob
 

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Just to clarify, the 2000 LT has an ABS unit on the left side of the bike close to the battery. If you only bleed the wheel circuit then you have only done half the job and risk long term damage to the ABS unit. The control circuits from the master cylinders to the ABS unit must also be done to do the job properly.
 

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deanwoolsey said:
Just to clarify, the 2000 LT has an ABS unit on the left side of the bike close to the battery. If you only bleed the wheel circuit then you have only done half the job and risk long term damage to the ABS unit. The control circuits from the master cylinders to the ABS unit must also be done to do the job properly.
Dean, 2000 LTs don't have wheel circuits/control circuits. Front reservoir goes to front of ABS unit to front wheel calipers. Rear reservior goest to rear of ABS unit to rear wheel caliper. There is no servo assist, linked braking, or any of the fancy stuff on the newer models. Even though the manual says you don't have to bleed the ABS unit unless the system has been opened or drained, I discovered a small amount of really dark fluid will come out of the ABS bleeders no matter how new the rest of the fluid is. Probably need to flush the ABS unit every couple years just to get it all.
 

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Lee is giving you the straight scoop......

The 99-01 LT's have a "simple" abs system...There are only two circuits, Front, and Rear..

Just bleed them both thoroughly and you'll most likely be fine...Be sure to bleed both sides of the front...And don't forget to take the diaphragm out of the rear resevoir before pouring in new brake fluid...

Letting a little out of the abs pump bianuallly doesn't hurt either....And while you're bleeding bleed the clutch circuit too....SBS 1010 speed bleeders throughout...

It's just a very small amount that's held within the pump itself.. I guess just activating the ABS a couple times a year would keep that circuit clean...Rear, easy, Front, Scary....

Good Luck..

John
 
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