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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,


I have a tire rotation question. I was just getting ready to install the new rear tire, a Shinko 777. As I was starting to bolt up the wheel to the hub, so I was standing facing the left side, I noticed the tire rotation arrow on the tire was going CW. It should be CCW correct?

Facing the bike on the right side, the front tire a Metzler has a direction of rotation of CW, if I take the rear tire off and flip it, the tire direction arrow would point CW as well, but the arrow would be on the right side, not the left.

Right?
 

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I always remember as (if mounted) "Arrow on top of tire points toward front of bike, arrow on bottom of tire points toward rear..."
 

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The easiest way to remember is when the motorcycle/car roll forward the arrow point toward the same direction, if it point the opposite or against the rotation direction chance are steel belts will separate and tire damage will occurred

Sent from my SGP312 using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks Gents. My first tire mount has not gone well. Looks like I get to do it again. :)

Appreciate the help. BMW best forum ever.

Ride on Brothers.
 

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Thanks Gents. My first tire mount has not gone well. Looks like I get to do it again. :)

Appreciate the help. BMW best forum ever.

Ride on Brothers.
Somehow I managed to do that once. I also checked it 3 times before mounting it and still got it wrong.

Stronga wind, Stronga rain, Stronga saki
 

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I've been changing my own motorcycle tires for 20 years now. I always draw a rotation arrow on the rim prior to removing the wheel from the bike. So far so good, I haven't mounted a tire the wrong direction yet.
 
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I've been changing my own motorcycle tires for 20 years now. I always draw a rotation arrow on the rim prior to removing the wheel from the bike. So far so good, I haven't mounted a tire the wrong direction yet.
I do that when I take the rim off to give it to a tyre shop to mount them... never trust anyone! (including yourself) :grin:
 

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I've been changing my own motorcycle tires for 20 years now. I always draw a rotation arrow on the rim prior to removing the wheel from the bike. So far so good, I haven't mounted a tire the wrong direction yet.
I do almost the same thing except I draw my arrow with a magic marker on the brake disk where the calipers ride-- arrow gone after a few miles!:wink:
My K1600's have an arrow embossed into the rim but hard to see when the wheel is on the machine.
 

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This has been a question in my mind for some time now. One year ago, I installed a Hannigan trike kit on my K1200LT. Since then, I have had abnormal wear on the front tire. Am now on the second Metzler 880 tire with about 6,000 miles on it and is showing lots of wear on the center of the tire. I have read many threads and asked various "experts" about this subject and have gotten many different opinions about installing a rear tire mounted backwards on the front in order to reduce tire wear. The consensus of opinions is that the belts are installed opposite on the tire body due to the directional torque of the rear tire (driving force) being opposite of the front tire (braking force). Therefore, on a trike, one would be using the rear tire as a braking force only which is why it would be put it on backwards. So, what would be the harm to inadvertently mounting the rear tire in the wrong configuration? Except that maybe it would affect the braking. Many people, including myself, would argue that the manufacturer put that "directional arrow" on the tire for a good reason. And that is, they want that tire to rotate in that direction.
 

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I wont go much into the construction of tires as I am not a tire engineer but they do manufacture motorcycle tires in a way that allows them to operate properly within stresses they encounter as in acceleration and a driving force for the rear and braking for the front and the direction of force applied in those instances are opposite so the tires are manufactured with those directional forces in mind hence the directional arrow and a front and rear designation. I have heard of people placing a rear on the front with a swap of direction but can't comment on the benefits.

I suspect that the accelerated wear in the center of the front tire may be due to additional scuff in corners as the bike no longer leans so all wear is now on the center and since the geometry is no longer the same, the forward motion in the turns translates to the front tire sliding sideways on the center every time you go into a corner. If the rubber compounds of rear tires is actually stronger than the front tire composition, you may find some benefit with a reversed rear on the front but a harder compound may also contribute to less overall grip so it may be a compromise. Many tires are made with a harder compound in the center for longevity and softer on the sides for corner adhesion. The difference if that the harder compound is not your friend on a trike as it was not made for being dragged sideways across the pavement but rolling straight. In a trike configuration, you are not able to take advantage of the softer tire sides for better grip. There may be a better tire ( front or rear) for you to use if you are looking for better mileage. Do some research and see as the front has many more offerings than the rear for load rating and speed. Hopefully I haven't grossly misstated some basic principals but it is my understanding of what may be going on.

Good luck in finding a better tire.
 

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I believe that the main reason for tire rotation arrows is to keep the tire safe when riding in the rain.
Most tires, including the Metzelers, have a chevron pattern in the thread that must come down with the inner edge hitting the ground or water first and the outer edge last to allow the water to be pushed away from the center of the wheel. If you install it the other way, the tire rotation will force the water towards the center of the wheel and you will quickly lose traction (aqua-planning) at relatively low speed.
The aquaplaning risk also increases with thread wear when the arrow points in the right direction.
On dry pavement it probably makes minimal difference for most of the Sunday riders.
 

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Rotation topic aside for a moment, I thought the Shinko 777 was Harley/Metric Cruiser tire? Is this an appropriate tire for the LT and are load/speed/temp ratings all acceptable?

I've had 3 LTs and it used to be only Bridgestone & Metzler made approved tires for the LT. I've been running Metzlers so long on LTs, that I havent really kept up, so there may be other options out there.

I do use a Shinko 244s on a dual sport of mine and find them to be a great tire for the price.



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Rotation topic aside for a moment, I thought the Shinko 777 was Harley/Metric Cruiser tire? Is this an appropriate tire for the LT and are load/speed/temp ratings all acceptable?

I've had 3 LTs and it used to be only Bridgestone & Metzler made approved tires for the LT. I've been running Metzlers so long on LTs, that I havent really kept up, so there may be other options out there.

I do use a Shinko 244s on a dual sport of mine and find them to be a great tire for the price.



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There is a size Shinko 777 HD with reinforced sidwalls that some have used although it isn't a V speed rating as is the original spec, depending on your normal load and usage, it could be an option. Here is a good review from someone on the forum on the 777 HD.

http://www.bmwlt.com/forums/k1200lt/127106-tire-review-shinko-777-h-d-rear-irc-rx-01-front.html
 
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