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Discussion Starter #1
This has probably been addressed elsewhere, but I'm striking out searching. I know I can just put the bike on the center stand to remove the rear wheel, but with no frame rails, how do I support the bike to remove the front? I've got both a yellow motorcycle jack and a scissor jack I use on the lift, I just don't want to crush or bend anything lifting the bike from the wrong spot.
 

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I jack mine under the engine next to the oil filter (not on the actual filter of course) using a block of wood between the bike and the jack to avoid damaging the engine fins - I only jack it enough to get clearance under the front wheel and never had any problems with this method. Tieing the centre stand to the front forks is also not a bad idea to prevent any chance of the bike coming off the stand.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
JonA said:
I jack mine under the engine next to the oil filter (not on the actual filter of course) using a block of wood between the bike and the jack to avoid damaging the engine fins - I only jack it enough to get clearance under the front wheel and never had any problems with this method. Tieing the centre stand to the front forks is also not a bad idea to prevent any chance of the bike coming off the stand.
Cool, I'll have to see if I have something suitable in the shop to block the bike up. Thanks!
 

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I do it exactly as JonA described. I run a ratcheting strap from the center stand crossbar forward and upwards to the front telelever. Snug is all it needs to be, or you risk bending the exhaust manifold. Then a jack under the engine, with a block of wood as a pad. Don't jack on the oil filter. It helps to remove the rear wheel first to get the front high enough to roll the front wheel out and clear the front fender.

Once I have the front wheel off I reinsert the front axle and lower it back down so the forks rest on a jack stand, that way the three points of balance are spread out farther than if the weight was on the jack under the engine. More stable that way.

JayJay
 

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You don't even need a jack. Put it on the centerstand and have someone push down on the rear luggage rack. The front wheel will come off the ground and you can stack lumber or some other appropriate item under the oil pan. Not much weight to support so no risk of breaking anything.
 

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GRB60 said:
You don't even need a jack. Put it on the centerstand and have someone push down on the rear luggage rack. The front wheel will come off the ground and you can stack lumber or some other appropriate item under the oil pan. Not much weight to support so no risk of breaking anything.
Yep! Works well.
 

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GRB60 said:
You don't even need a jack. Put it on the centerstand and have someone push down on the rear luggage rack. The front wheel will come off the ground and you can stack lumber or some other appropriate item under the oil pan. Not much weight to support so no risk of breaking anything.
Two cases of wine, one on the luggage rack and one on the pillion seat, cause the front wheel to rise when the bike is on the center stand. Easier to add them after the bike is on the stand than it is to put the bike on the stand with them already attached. DAMHIK.

I recall someone else advocating a 5-gal carboy of water on the luggage rack, that's 40+ lbs.

JayJay
 

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I've posted this picture before. This is my method and it works great. The topcase holds two - five gallon waterbottles and that is more than enough weight to lift the front. For even more security you can use a tie-down strap connected from a hook or ceiling rafter to the handlebars.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
JayJay said:
I do it exactly as JonA described. I run a ratcheting strap from the center stand crossbar forward and upwards to the front telelever. Snug is all it needs to be, or you risk bending the exhaust manifold. Then a jack under the engine, with a block of wood as a pad. Don't jack on the oil filter. It helps to remove the rear wheel first to get the front high enough to roll the front wheel out and clear the front fender.

Once I have the front wheel off I reinsert the front axle and lower it back down so the forks rest on a jack stand, that way the three points of balance are spread out farther than if the weight was on the jack under the engine. More stable that way.
This sounds like the way to go since I plan on having both wheels off at once. Thanks!
 

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I use a Pit Bull front stand for front tire changes, no mess, no fuss quick and easy.

-JT
 

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Probably a serious newbie question but, other than changing a tire, why would you want to take the wheels on/off is there some cleaning/maintenance other than changing a tire for doing this?
As UN-mechanical as I am I would definitely have the dealership perform such a task but I was just curious since so many seem to be doing this...
This question coming from a person that over filled the oil only to monitor an oil drip for weeks trying to determine the cause, dealer pointed out my flaw....
Jed
 

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One word of caution.

All these various things will work, but you should take steps to keep the bike from rolling forward off the centerstand while you are doing all this work.

Take a look at the issue. Anytime I take my back wheel off, I strap the cross member of the centerstand to the front wheel. Since you will have the front wheel off, you will want to look for another place to tie off to.

You may think this is over kill, but imagine the world of hurt you will be in if it rolls off....

just sayn'
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I'm figuring on strapping the Paralever to the front of the lift the luggage rack to the back of the lift, and the center stand to something up front.
 

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JRESURF said:
Probably a serious newbie question but, other than changing a tire, why would you want to take the wheels on/off is there some cleaning/maintenance other than changing a tire for doing this?
As UN-mechanical as I am I would definitely have the dealership perform such a task but I was just curious since so many seem to be doing this...
This question coming from a person that over filled the oil only to monitor an oil drip for weeks trying to determine the cause, dealer pointed out my flaw....
Jed
Jed - yes, changing the tires is probably the most obvious reason for pulling the wheels. But you also need to pull the rear wheel to change the rear drive fluid and lube the spline (opinions vary, but I change it every other oil change, or every 12K miles). And frankly it's a lot easier to wash the wheels and the insides of the suspension (ie, front fork, rear wheel pocket) when the wheels are off, that's not a reason per se to do it but as long as you have them off, go ahead and wash them up.

If you can pull the wheels yourself you cut down considerably on the cost of a tire change. Going rate for my area is $45 to mount and balance if the shop pulls the wheels, $20 if I bring them in myself. So each tire change I've saved $50, plus I have the assurance of getting the wheels installed correctly when I do it myself. I also use this time to closely examine brake pads and rotors.

If you don't feel comfortable, by all means have the dealer do it. But as maintenance goes, pulling the wheels is not terribly complicated.

JayJay
 

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Thanks for the feedback, and that is pretty much what I figured reading through the forums. Considering I still only have 6500 miles on my 2008 RT, which I plan to greatly increase this Spring/Summer, I probably do not have to take it off anytime soon.
Jed
 

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Just a comment, someone mentioned removing the rear wheel to enable you to jack the front high enough to remove it clearing the front fender.

It;s far easier to remove the four torx screws holding on the front portion of the fender, it then pops of and you can roll the wheel forward (after unbolting calipers and slipping them away from discs).
You only need 1/2 an inch of clearance or so this way.
Block of wood under sump and a scissor jack has worked for the many times I've removed the front wheel for tyre fitment.
hth
\v/
 
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