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Discussion Starter #1
It recently occurred to me that all of the flats on my LT have been nails and all have been in the rear tire. any one picked up one in a front tire? any guess why mine have all been in the rear?

While I was day dreaming away about this I wondered if a large magnet would be able to pick up a nail before it could attack the rear tire? If it is theoretically possible, how large? Can a large enough one be made, an electromagnetic one from the 12V D.C.?

Best from tucson
Bob
 

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maybe a mud flap slightly dragging the ground at a angle just before the rear tire?

surely you're not serious because I aint..lol.:D
 

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The theory on car punctures (rear tyre more prevalent) is that the front tyre flicks the object up to be trapped under the rear at precisely the right angle to penetrate. Easier to occur in the wet as the projectile is lubricated by the water.
This (statistical) advice is from my mate who has had his own motor & tyre business for 38 years, he's seen his share of punctures. As for the magnet, we have them as tramp metal ejectors on conveyors where I work, huge currents involved.
 

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Old Slow Guy in A Fast Car
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Of all the bikes I've towed that have a flat tire the vast majority are rear. My guess is maybe 1 out of every 20 tires is a front tire. As stated already the front tire kicks up the object throwing it into the rear tire.
 

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On numerous bikes I have NEVER got a flat front tire, always the rear. Which is good, I had a flat front tire on a bicycle, it's bad news.

Maybe rear has more weight allowing objects to penetrate, whatever.

On cars I'd go maybe 60/40 rear versus front. Most minor flat tires I fix myself using the little gooey sticks.
 

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I have significantly reduced the number of nails and screws in my tires by not parking my bike on the carpeting in my garage.....:rotf:
oh i forgot to add drill bits....where does all that crap come from??
 

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No flats on my LT so far. However, the front tire is a lot narrower than the rear, so that right there would probably mean a 3x more likely to catch a nail etc. than in the front, all else being equal. Which, I'm sure, they aren't.

Thinking about my experience on cars, most of those have been in the rear as well, though several were, I suspect, "planted" by people I had pissed off.

As for a magnet ... well, the problem is, magnetic fields fall off RAPIDLY with distance. If you have something that doesn't impact the ground clearance of the bike, you would probably have to have a near super-conducting magnet to pull a nail off the ground. If you were willing to dangle something movable (the mudflap idea) an inch off the ground, you could probably get by with some nice passive "rare earth" magnets. If you know anyone in the IT business, they probably have a large collection of them harvested from dead/obsolete hard disks. Also...IF you pull a nail off the ground, it has to be fully captured by the magnet at 70+MPH -- not just oriented upwards in a perfect position to plunge into the rear tire as it comes by, or pulling a nail that your rear tire would have missed a little closer so now you DO hit it. Also...if it is on a mud-flap like thing, when you hit a bump, the flap will bounce up...and probably stick to the bottom of the bike and stay there.

Electromagnet...I don't think you would get enough pull with the power available on the bike -- plus you'd be horribly impacting your gas milage by sucking a lot of juice from the alternator. (hm. however... maybe a large electromaget, not constantly engaged, but energized by a large capacitor for a fraction of a second every time it detected you driving over a metal object, the object gets pulled up, and a (relatively) small permanent magnet holds it until you stop.) Of course, you could drive over a washer and have the zipper of your boot ripped off! Ok, I'm over thinking this now, I must stop. :)

Another problem with the magnet idea: it only works with magnetic materials -- aluminum, brass, stainless steel will still be making a beeline for your tire.
 

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Maybe there is room for a short but yet wide tire to run in front of the rear tire..sacrificial so to say..like sponge rubber maybe?:dance:
 

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Discussion Starter #9
thank you for the time everyone took to post.

Looks as if the magnet theory won't work unless its a LARGE supermagnet that hangs so it remains parallel to road when we learn.

Installing a wheel between the front a rear to eat the nails doesn't seem workable.

so that seems to leave a "mud-flap" of some type to alter the path of a nail the front tire aims at the rear tire? I'm assuming when the front aims the nail towards the rear that the nail doesn't hit anything on its way, like the crash pan on the trany?

Maybe something like a dust pan just skimming above the road right behind where the tire meets the road? Put two little leds on it looking like eye balls and pain a little nose down a little between the eye balls and have The Great Goblin-up-nails on duty? :))

Bob
 

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In my opinion, with tubeless tyres, punctures are no more a big issue.
Often you do not even notice a puncture when it happens and the tyre gets flat only after several days or weeks.
With the repair kits, it is easy to fix on the roadside.

Bruno
 

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Maybe you could mount one of those "red light triggers" on your bike in front of rear tire. I understand that these units are a magnet attached with plastic wire tie. :histerica
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Hi Bruno

I've tried three times to plug a rear tire with the mushroom plug; none of the plugs lasted more than a few miles before the plug fell out of the hole.

It seems as if people have good luck with the strips. Ultimately patching it from the inside seems the best long term solution. Unfortunately that cannot be done on the side of a road and here in the USA gas stations and tire places do not want to take the risk of getting sued if they patch a tire from the inside.

I bought compound one places inside the tire rim assembly that is supposed to not only seal flats, but also balance the tire rim combination. since I'm planning a ride back to New England in August and back here later on, I'll find out after putting a few thousand miles on the rear tire if I cab see or feel any difference.

Bob
 

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I've patched 3 tires with the slime repair kit from Walmart for about $10, combined with a mini tire pump for about $10, I carry it with me all the time. Never had a repair come out.
 

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Flats, what a pain.

Been riding for 45 years now and have only had one flat on the front in all that time. Pretty sure the way it works is when the front rolls over a nail, screw, bolts, whatever, it flips it sharp side up just in time for the rear to to commit suicide.

Most have been nails but have also been gotten by something that tore a hole large enough to insert 2 fingers, never saw it but felt the results immediately. Big heavy bikes can be a real hand full with a flat rear, especially when they try to come off the rim.

Have tried all sorts of different tactics through the years with mixed results. Hung a large magnet at the leading edge of the skid plate and collected an amazing amount of metal. An added bonus with it was it would easily trip the left turn lights that were loop activated. Not sure if it help much with flats, did not have one in the 6 or 7 years I ran one, have since lost it, somewhere, probably came off because of a speed hump, probably stuck to the bottom of a low rider somewhere.

In days of old, the old time riders ran a mud flap on the front fender that barely cleared the ground. Don't see a good way to hang a flap on an LT, that floppy plastic won't support it. If memory serves correctly, don't remember having a flt on the rear while running a flap on my old FLH.

On the magnets, used to be able to lay hands on them when repairing the PMG on large generators. There were 8 of them in there, about the size of a cell phone. They would stick on the skid plate, or any ferrous metal, tight enough no attachment hardware needed, you want it off, it would take some effort. Need to start looking for more.

Now days, carry a repair kit and an air compressor.
 

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I have a good hard disk magnet story I will share one day, when I have enough time..:D
 

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Discussion Starter #16
There are still a couple of traffic lights that my LT won't trigger.

guess I should hunt around for a large magnet to see if it will at least trigger stop lights and maybe pick up nails.

the most unusual flat I ever got was a metal part from a snow mobile tread. Course that was when I lived in western Mass in Becket MA.

Bob
 

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I had hard drive magnets on my skid plate to help trigger certain traffic lights. It did pickup some unexpected debris. Certainly had to be going very slow or stopped at the time.
 
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