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Ponch said:
I agree. It's amazing how quickly riding skills deteriorate. I imagine that flying aircraft is even more so. The funny thing is, I don't find as much skills deterioration with cars, but may be I just don't lay off as long or it's because I have done it longer.

I still don't know how you guys here in AZ ride in the summer. It's nuts. It's my first summer here (been here since June 16) and I find it brutal. I'd rather ride in 20˚F temps than 110˚F temps.

Interesting Factoid: The fine motor skills that are used in riding a motorcycle are exactly the same used to fly an aircraft. I kind of suspect that is why there are a whole lot of pilots who also ride motorcycles. We are kind of flying low on a bike :)
 

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Ponch said:
I still don't know how you guys here in AZ ride in the summer. It's nuts. It's my first summer here (been here since June 16) and I find it brutal. I'd rather ride in 20˚F temps than 110˚F temps.
Ponch, I think that you now understand the half joking comment I made a while ago about putting on the Gerbings when the temperature got to 50 degrees! Your blood does "thin out"!

Regards,
 

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cessna said:
Ponch, I think that you now understand the half joking comment I made a while ago about putting on the Gerbings when the temperature got to 50 degrees! Your blood does "thin out"!

Regards,
I had always been a polar bear and in the last few years the -20˚ nights in Iowa started getting old quickly. The knees and back don't like it that cold anymore and snow has become old. That said, I still don't dig heat over 100˚, dry or not. Climate wise, I find Santa Cruz perfect and only climate wise.
 

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RonKMiller said:
Give it about a month or two when we get into our riding season. By January you'll be taunting your friends in NY and Iowa with tales about how great the riding is in AZ.

And it really is... I've lived here since 1985 and never get bored - that's hard to do in just about any state. ..and just when I think I've seen all the pavement in the Western US (since 1972 when I moved to Colorado) I decided to pick up a junker KLR this past spring.

Now I've got thousands and thousands of new miles to explore. :thumb:

There is no better place in the world to ride, although I am partial to the Pacific coast line as an alternative every 5 years or so... :bike:
Santa Cruz is pretty nice weather wise. 50 at night, 70-75 during the day. That would be easy to get used to.
 

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Eureka said:
No one has mentioned the role of the passenger in keeping the bike balanced. If your passenger is moving around when you are coming to a stop it makes keeping the bike balanced much more difficult. The passenger needs to keep their body centered on the bike and keep both feet on the pegs.

Also, the advice about using the rear brake only during stops after your speed is down to about 5 MPH is the proper procedure. Putting both feet out and using the front brake is a prescription for disaster. The front brake can drop you faster than a used lottery ticket when used at slow speeds such as when stopping or turning. Stopping using the rear brake during the last few feet of the stop takes practice but you should be able to do it and plant the left foot at the moment you stop.

Riding two up is difficult for most people under ideal conditions. Stopping distances increase, weight transfer is harder to manage, and balance especially with a figgity passenger is tricky. Practice is the only solution.




Just my thoughts :)
I agree 100%. I ride solo for these reasons. Unless I get an offer I can't refuse. :rotf:
 

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I have had absolutely no trouble with my 2011 rt being tipsy. However, I did just put 63,000 miles on a 2004 K1200 LT. That one could tip over any time you were going less than 5 mph.
Rich.
 

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I traded in my Vespa 300 GTS for a 2012 RT. it's been a long time since I've been on a bike even close to this big. I have felt "tipsy" as I approach a stop, and want to thank all for their advice on this topic. I did a lot of parking lot work to get my "M" endorsement with my Vespa. I plan to get back in the lot with the RT and get off the front break at slow speeds! Thank you :)

P.S. I've been lurking for a while, and I'm new to the forum. I'm looking forward to all your experiences and knowledge about the RT series.
 

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I currently own a 2004 FJR. One of the reasons I am looking to move over to the RT is because of the lower center of gravity that the RT has vs. the FJR.

For me, the FJR is a piece of cake compared to my buddies LT that I took for a short ride. To me, the LT is a tippy beast!
 

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MagnesiumMike said:
I traded in my Vespa 300 GTS for a 2012 RT. it's been a long time since I've been on a bike even close to this big. I have felt "tipsy" as I approach a stop, and want to thank all for their advice on this topic. I did a lot of parking lot work to get my "M" endorsement with my Vespa. I plan to get back in the lot with the RT and get off the front break at slow speeds! Thank you :)

P.S. I've been lurking for a while, and I'm new to the forum. I'm looking forward to all your experiences and knowledge about the RT series.

Hi Mike ! Welcome to the group :wave

You will find that as you accumulate mileage on your RT, it will feel like a larger version of the Vespa, and have a lot more performance. Take it slowly at first, because most newbies to the RT are somewhat intimidated by the fairing which makes the bike appear huge compared to a naked bike or a scooter. Seat time will make a believer out of you that this is an outstanding and very easy to maneuver bike. It is a great cruiser and a very fun town-blaster.
 

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ka5ysy said:
Hi Mike ! Welcome to the group :wave

You will find that as you accumulate mileage on your RT, it will feel like a larger version of the Vespa, and have a lot more performance. Take it slowly at first, because most newbies to the RT are somewhat intimidated by the fairing which makes the bike appear huge compared to a naked bike or a scooter. Seat time will make a believer out of you that this is an outstanding and very easy to maneuver bike. It is a great cruiser and a very fun town-blaster.
Thanks for the welcome Doug. I already have logged over 1,000 miles in just a few weeks. I watched this YouTube from a previous post and was very impressed!

http://youtube.com/watch?v=7KRP0VknbBo

Living in Minnesota we are getting close to the end of our riding season. I hope to get in a couple longer rides and parking lot work before the snow flys :)
 

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Yeah, but what can I do about staying off the front brake on my K1200LT? Maybe that's why I've never dropped my R1100RT but have dropped my K1200LT three times(two up only once) in parking lots. Link brakes suck in my book.
 

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Richie, Lots of really good suggestions given in this post. My take is the RT is a little thin on the leverage due to the bars, and if you are coming off cruisers/tours of the HD type, a lot narrower. Since I to fit that description (but haven't dropped my bike) I'd say the advice of keeping the bars square at stops is real good, but I'd go a step further. When two up and more weight is gonna shift to the front at stops, try using the rear brake only once down to walking speed. I did it on my HD as well (you probably did also) but you get into the front brake only routine with the RT, so when you are 2up you continue this routine. Switch it up to rear brake only for stops, again once down to walking speeds if you catch my drift. You might try the comfort setting as well when 2 up.
 

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I have had my Rt for a year now and have dropped it two up a couple of times.

Have read many post stating that most riders will drop there RT.

I had a Victory and found it much easier at stops to keep it stable while coming to a stop than my RT. Not saying the Victory was a better bike. You seldom hear of a Victory or Harley tipping so often.

I have 10,000 miles on my 2011 RT and still find it a little tough is slow traffic and at some stops when two up. Maybe its just me?

Thanks for any help

Richie
Well I’m glad I’m not the only one who’s dropped my bike!!!! Hahaha. I chalk up to, at least for me, being the tallest and heaviest bike I’ve ever owned and I need to be much more mindful about not letting it lean over too much when stopped because there’s no catching this bike. I’ve also been practicing low speed maneuvers in a parking lot. There are a lot of very helpful videos on YouTube about this very subject. Good luck
 

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Well I’m glad I’m not the only one who’s dropped my bike!!!! Hahaha. I chalk up to, at least for me, being the tallest and heaviest bike I’ve ever owned and I need to be much more mindful about not letting it lean over too much when stopped because there’s no catching this bike. I’ve also been practicing low speed maneuvers in a parking lot. There are a lot of very helpful videos on YouTube about this very subject. Good luck
Holy Crap this is old. Do you realize you revived the dead from 2012?

Anyway to address this, I came from a Yamaha FJR which was very top heavy due to an inline-4 and 32" seat height. The RTW is night and day different and very well balanced with the center of gravity being very low. You will have a hard time finding something more well balanced IMO-unless you are vertically challenged and looking for a 28" or less seat height. Then maybe it is time for 3 wheels.
 

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I had a FJR before and it seemed very stable, but rode like a small tank. The RTW is lighter in the front end with a steering damper. When riding two up for me I try to use all the previous tricks. I have to remind my wife that when coming to a stop make sure she puts her arms around my waist and not hold on to the rear bars. That makes her not lean to one side or the other when I am trying to stop. One time she almost put me down putting her weight on the rear bars at a stop to one side. I took all my strength to keep it upright. Hope this helps.
 
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