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Discussion Starter #21
Making full lock u turns and riding slow really has not been a problem. My problem has only been coming to a full stop two up. I have been using the front brake gently because i feel safer putting both feed down when two up. With the bike being high and my short legs and being old, i try not to hold the bike with just one foot. It may be that is the only safe way to stop is use the rear brake only. I will keep a better eye on keeping the bars straight when stoping.

Richie
 

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Richie:

One thing I see all the time in my classes is that a lot of riders tend to turn the bars one way or the other unconsciously when they brake, either to the right when squeezing the brake lever (tendency is to pull the right bar back a bit) or to be looking left or right a bit for some reason before the bike stops, and it will magically go where the head is pointing.

When you make your stop using both brakes, pay attention to the bar position, and keep your head and eyes up to the horizon, and you should stop without a wobble and be able to put both feet down easily with no dramatics.

If you have a passenger, tell them to sit still ! :rolleyes:
 

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I went from a Roadking to a R1200Rt, I understand what your concerns are. The two solutions are lower seat or do what I did was buy the BMW touring boots (slightly thicker sole) which results in a more comfortable/stable stopping procedure. Also, try stopping with your right foot remaining on the footpeg/rear brake. I find this works for me riding either solo or with a pillion, it is a more naturnal stopping procedure then placing both feet on the ground.

Good luck from Oz
 

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Im 6ft 1in , 34inseam and I need boots to feel the comfort zone, I do have a russel seat . I have taken to using the k75 for around town, hard to believe my 87 k bike is so much smoother than my rt..
 

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Richie1 said:
. My problem has only been coming to a full stop two up.
Richie
The problem for me is that I have a 30" inseam and the RT seat is high. Solo no problem. Two up, if she wiggles, then I tend to waggle when I stop. I wear riding boots with thicker soles and when stopping I move forward and a little left on the seat and put only my left foot down. It works pretty well.
 

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No one has mentioned the role of the passenger in keeping the bike balanced. If your passenger is moving around when you are coming to a stop it makes keeping the bike balanced much more difficult. The passenger needs to keep their body centered on the bike and keep both feet on the pegs.

Also, the advice about using the rear brake only during stops after your speed is down to about 5 MPH is the proper procedure. Putting both feet out and using the front brake is a prescription for disaster. The front brake can drop you faster than a used lottery ticket when used at slow speeds such as when stopping or turning. Stopping using the rear brake during the last few feet of the stop takes practice but you should be able to do it and plant the left foot at the moment you stop.

Riding two up is difficult for most people under ideal conditions. Stopping distances increase, weight transfer is harder to manage, and balance especially with a figgity passenger is tricky. Practice is the only solution.

Just my thoughts :)
 

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When I stop, I put both feet down. It is much more secure than a single left foot stop.
 

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I came from a Harley Ultra. When I have the wife on the back, two feet on the ground (she can be like a squirrel, even though she knows what that does to me). Like already said, the cruiser has a lower cg and is easier to keep upright. Be able to flat foot both feet. First time I had the wife on the RT with the ESA set up for two, I almost dumped it. Surprise how much taller it is.
 

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Sure, keep your bike straight, look ahead, slip your clutch, use the rear brake, don't turn the bars before stopping... all this is very sound advice, but it amounts to naught when you stop and find one of your foot has to reach like 4 or 5 inches lower than the general street surface, because of a hole, or a mound, and what not. Or your find a dead leaf, a small branch or a patch of sand or gravel. This is where the bike tips over very unpredictably, very quickly, very heavily. Even more so if'you've just filled her up. And who is using their rear brake for emercency stopping? It takes way too long, plus the bike does not actually stop right here and there with the rear brake. The problem is when you're leaning over in a turn, and you have to suddenly apply the brakes because of this idiot cyclist, riding on the wrong side of the street or agains the one-way, is coming right at you. Or the no-less idiot pedestrian crossing the street like 15 meters past the crosswalk, where you don't expect him. Or the cager who suddenly stops in a turn for no apparent reason and you're right behind him.

To stop in a straight line, with time to see and think, is one thing. And even that can present its share of problems, if you're not careful. To make an emergency stop while turning is an entirely different matter. And this where the top-heavy RT can prove to be a difficult beast to prevent from falling on its side.
 

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Time to chime in here.

Yes the RT is Tippy at stops.

No matter how hard I try... I have figured out that now and then I must put my feet down.

Sure, I roll one every now and then but there are lots of times you just must get the outriggers down.

Glad I could help.
 

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TWheels said:
The problem for me is that I have a 30" inseam and the RT seat is high. Solo no problem. Two up, if she wiggles, then I tend to waggle when I stop. I wear riding boots with thicker soles and when stopping I move forward and a little left on the seat and put only my left foot down. It works pretty well.
+1 on this post.
I just had my 1st drop @ an intersection in stop & go traffic, with her on the back, (after over 2+K miles 2 up). Dreaded front brake grab. :(
Damaged the bike & wife sprained her back. Not good & very embarrassing.
My dealer kindly swapped my stock seat for the (heated) low version. Wow! What a difference. The RT feels like a different machine for me. I have much more confidence & control & don't really care if it's not as comfortable as the stocker for long days...
 

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Never had any problems with this issue.
I am 185 cm long and wear W36L34 jeans. You have to convert it in your figures by yourselves. ;)

But I have dropped my motorrad once. In Corsica I have stopped for few pics. The parking lot was messy, not planed, gravel. I have parked bike with front looking down a little bit. I know - i am stupid, but I thought it will be just fine. Other places at that lot was either hard to drive in/out or totally soft pavement. This is not THAT place, but very similar.


Of course, before to mount myself off, I have checked situation. And it was just fine, before I thought to take off my jacket and store it in top case ... Once I pushed the lock of top case, that tiny force was just enough to swing over side stand's top point. At next second my motorrad was laying on cylinder head/side case.... :mad:

Another 200 $ to painting shop for this winter....
 

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Discussion Starter #33
In order to gain a little better reach to the ground, will it do any harm riding two up when set for one rider? I could set it to normal or sport mode to stiffen the suspension some. My weight is about 200l pounds and my wife is about 145. The bike does seem lower set this way.

Richie
 

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Richie1 said:
In order to gain a little better reach to the ground, will it do any harm riding two up when set for one rider? I could set it to normal or sport mode to stiffen the suspension some. My weight is about 200l pounds and my wife is about 145. The bike does seem lower set this way.

Richie
RIchie: I ride that way with my wife. I weigh about 225 with the gear, and she weights about 120 with the gear on, but the ride height is not really an issue as I have plenty of suspension travel. Set for two up, the preload jacks the rear up a good bit. Besides, she only rides with me occasionally, so I don't even fool with setting preload as a rule. Usually when we are in motion I may go into sport mode on the ESA, but that is about it.
 

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Hammam said:
Sure, keep your bike straight, look ahead, slip your clutch, use the rear brake, don't turn the bars before stopping... all this is very sound advice, but it amounts to naught when you stop and find one of your foot has to reach like 4 or 5 inches lower than the general street surface, because of a hole, or a mound, and what not.
When you are riding, the proper technique to avoid this situation is to pay attention to the road surface and make the decision where you are landing before you get there. It is easy to do with practice. For sloped surfaces your choice is to put your foot on the uphill side, or if you absolutely have to go to the low side, slide your butt off the seat to the side you are putting your foot down on. This is the only option for tall dirt bikes, and it works well with the RT.

Hammam said:
Or your find a dead leaf, a small branch or a patch of sand or gravel. This is where the bike tips over very unpredictably, very quickly, very heavily. Even more so if' you've just filled her up.
Again, this is simply a question of being totally aware of what the road surface looks like and placing your foot down appropriately. Unseen hazards of powder sand, or oily wet surfaces are a trap that will catch anyone at some point, so being ATGATT is a really good idea too.


Hammam said:
And who is using their rear brake for emergency stopping? It takes way too long, plus the bike does not actually stop right here and there with the rear brake.
If you are doing a properly executed emergency stop, you should be using BOTH brakes simultaneously. If you are riding a later model RT, that is being done automatically anyway.


Hammam said:
The problem is when you're leaning over in a turn, and you have to suddenly apply the brakes because of this idiot cyclist, riding on the wrong side of the street or against the one-way, is coming right at you.
This is a training and practice thing we teach in the MSF course. The exercise is called "Stopping in turns" and is easily accomplished by quickly counter-steering the bike upright, getting the bars straight and doing a proper quick stop straight ahead using both brakes fully. If you have the bars turned any to either direction when you get on the brakes, you will dump the bike. This is an operator error and not the fault of the bike.


Hammam said:
Or the no-less idiot pedestrian crossing the street like 15 meters past the crosswalk, where you don't expect him. Or the cager who suddenly stops in a turn for no apparent reason and you're right behind him.
Again, you should be scanning for possible hazards forward and to the sides especially with parked cars that pedestrians have a habit of popping out from between. In the instance of your cager who stops suddenly, why are you riding so close that it is an issue? Open up a reactionary gap to avoid rear-ending cars in front of you, and you will avoid a high pucker-factor situation.


Hammam said:
To stop in a straight line, with time to see and think, is one thing. And even that can present its share of problems, if you're not careful. To make an emergency stop while turning is an entirely different matter. And this where the top-heavy RT can prove to be a difficult beast to prevent from falling on its side.

There are three things that you absolutely must practice regularly because they are volatile skills:

1. Quick stops straight ahead
2. Quick stops in a turn
3. Swerves.

I regularly demonstrate all three techniques on my RT with the bags on and fully loaded. There is no excitement doing any of them, and you would be surprised at how nicely the RT can do all three, IF YOU KNOW THE TECHNIQUE AND PRACTICE THEM REGULARLY !.

For anyone uncomfortable doing these exercises, I would respectfully suggest taking a rider refresher course, or other advanced riding courses. You will definitely learn something useful, and maybe a lot of stuff you did not know before.

Being proficient in the three skills noted above will absolutely save your life, and I can guarantee that at some point you WILL need to use one or more of these to avoid a really bad situation.
 

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Well said... ;)

Living in the steenking desert I often go 3 or 4 months at a time without riding my LT. Yeah, I'm a pussy.

Before heading out on the open road I PRACTICE full panic stops up to 50 mph and swerving around 1/2 tennis balls placed randomly in a "slalom" course in a deserted parking lot. I'm always amazed how rusty I am initially, but how quickly it comes back within 30 minutes or so. Not only is it fun it is a life saving skill that MUST BE MASTERED.

The same is true in aviation - you are required to demonstrate 3 take offs and landings if you are more than 90 days out from your last flight before carrying passengers.

I still don't get all of the combined opinions of what a top heavy bike an RT is? This simply is not true. Either get some high heeled boots or a lower seat. This isn't rocket science guys. Figure out the ergonomics before you start whining about the machine.

(Full disclosure - I also own a boxer)
 

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RonKMiller said:
Well said... ;)

Living in the steenking desert I often go 3 or 4 months at a time without riding my LT. Yeah, I'm a pussy.

I'm always amazed how rusty I am initially, but how quickly it comes back within 30 minutes or so.
The same is true in aviation
I agree. It's amazing how quickly riding skills deteriorate. I imagine that flying aircraft is even more so. The funny thing is, I don't find as much skills deterioration with cars, but may be I just don't lay off as long or it's because I have done it longer.

I still don't know how you guys here in AZ ride in the summer. It's nuts. It's my first summer here (been here since June 16) and I find it brutal. I'd rather ride in 20˚F temps than 110˚F temps.
 

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Ponch said:
I agree. It's amazing how quickly riding skills deteriorate. I imagine that flying aircraft is even more so. The funny thing is, I don't find as much skills deterioration with cars, but may be I just don't lay off as long or it's because I have done it longer.

I still don't know how you guys here in AZ ride in the summer. It's nuts. It's my first summer here (been here since June 16) and I find it brutal. I'd rather ride in 20˚F temps than 110˚F temps.
Well, there's your problem - you live in the REALLY steenking desert! Why, we're at least 10 degrees cooler every day! BRRRRrrrrrr, chilly.

Where's my down jacket? :wave
 

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RonKMiller said:
Well, there's your problem - you live in the REALLY steenking desert! Why, we're at least 10 degrees cooler every day! BRRRRrrrrrr, chilly.

Where's my down jacket? :wave
I don't think I'll need down here. Chilly? Not so far. Dante lives here.
 

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Ponch said:
I don't think I'll need down here. Chilly? Not so far. Dante lives here.
Give it about a month or two when we get into our riding season. By January you'll be taunting your friends in NY and Iowa with tales about how great the riding is in AZ.

And it really is... I've lived here since 1985 and never get bored - that's hard to do in just about any state. ..and just when I think I've seen all the pavement in the Western US (since 1972 when I moved to Colorado) I decided to pick up a junker KLR this past spring.

Now I've got thousands and thousands of new miles to explore. :thumb:

There is no better place in the world to ride, although I am partial to the Pacific coast line as an alternative every 5 years or so... :bike:
 
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