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Discussion Starter #1
I have had my Rt for a year now and have dropped it two up a couple of times.

Have read many post stating that most riders will drop there RT.

I had a Victory and found it much easier at stops to keep it stable while coming to a stop than my RT. Not saying the Victory was a better bike. You seldom hear of a Victory or Harley tipping so often.

I have 10,000 miles on my 2011 RT and still find it a little tough is slow traffic and at some stops when two up. Maybe its just me?

Thanks for any help

Richie
 

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I've ridden an R1200RT once on a test ride. I don't remember it being top heavy like the LT is. I've also ridden a number of V-twin motorcycles both domestic and imported. All I can tell you is that it's the nature of the beast. The V-twin nearly always carries its own weight down low, added to that is usually a low seat, giving you a low center of gravity which also means excellent low speed handling.
 

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Maybe it's just you. I've never dropped my bike nor felt the RT was "tipsy". Quite the contrary, actually. You probably need to loosen up on the bike. I've noticed that people that ride in a very stiff fashion tend to have a lot of problems controlling their motorcycles at low speed, regardless of the weight of the bike. A large part of why RT's and even big HD cruisers are selected for police service so often is due to their slow speed maneuverability. If you're not comfortable with handling your bike at low speed, practice it incessantly and, even better, take a civilian-geared police riding course. Many sheriff's departments have them and they're a great way to learn how to handle your bike at low speed from the pros.
 

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One problem many riders have that I notice is that they stay on the front brake at very low speeds and are turning the bars while doing this coming to a stop. This is a very easy way to drop any bike. Get off the front brake unless the bars are square, front wheel straight ahead. Best practice is probably to use both brakes to around 5mph then use only the rear doing the final stop.

Trust me on this, at low speeds (parking lot maneuver speed or less) if you have the bars turned the least bit to either side with the front brake on, the bike is going to pull hard in the direction of turn and it is very difficult to recover once the drop begins.

FWIW, many people who take our Riders Edge courses that have dropped a bike a low speed realize that they touched the front brake and had an instant asphaltic experience.
 

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You might want to try a riding boot with a thicker sole. The Victories have a much lower seat height so they are easier to balance with shorter legs.
 

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The RT is a relatively tall bike, especially compared to cruisers. The extra height combined with two people and possibly someone that has insufficient inseam might present some stability issues when stopped. If it's an inseam issue, you could lower the seat/get a low seat and wear boots with thicker soles. If it isn't that, may be your legs aren't strong. Just saying. As we age we lose muscle mass unless we work at it.
 

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I've got about 18k on my 2011 RT after just over a year of ownership. I remember pulling out of the dealership into rush hour traffic and thinking I had completely forgotten how to ride a bike at slow speed. My FJR was a piece of cake compared to this wallowing beast I had just spend a load of money to buy.

I had ridden 600 miles to buy it and the plan was to ride another 200 back, stay the night and ride the last 400 miles in the morning.

The rush hour lasted about 45 minutes. During that time I was cursing the damn thing. No matter how I tried I couldn't make any sort of reasonable stop and at speeds under 7-8 mph I felt like I had almost no control.

I got gas the next morning and checked the tire pressures. 28 in the front and 32 in the back. I pumped them up to 39/41 and have been happy ever since.

Oh yeah, the front brake advice on previous posts is good.

bob
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks, so much for the help as i am willing to take advice from anyone. It seems like it's not just me from the amount of post about crash bars and repainting side cases. At 69 yrs. old i ride 12,000 miles a year and do love this bike but i would rather have a Harley on its wheels than a RT on the cases. Twice down in a year may be twice to many for an old couple.

Richie
 

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I found that practicing in a school parking lot and using the rear brake only at low speeds makes all the difference. Just stare straight ahead, brake with the right foot, and put just your left foot down like a pro. I think you'll have it down in no time. Fearing it is part of the problem or at least it was for me. I moved from a Harley cruiser to the RT and I think the RT is easier for me to handle now at low speeds than the Harley was. It took a while though.
 

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As said before, I can almost assure you that you're stopping with the bars turned and front brake applied.

Remember as you come to a stop, look straight ahead, and focus on keeping the bars straight as you brake. If you do that, I think you'll find your problem goes away.
 

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Bkrnrd said:
I found that practicing in a school parking lot and using the rear brake only at low speeds makes all the difference. Just stare straight ahead, brake with the right foot, and put just your left foot down like a pro. I think you'll have it down in no time...{snip}
+1 :thumb:

These comments are offered by a 61 y.o. "Kid":

It took me a few drops to make the adjustment from a cruiser to the RT. As stated before, the key is coming to a gentle stop using the rear brake. Also, judiciously using partial rear brake (and feathering the throttle in the friction zone) when executing low-speed manoevers does wonders for stability.

Take the advice above about practicing (solo) in a school parking lot. Bring some tennis balls cut in half as markers and practice coming to a slow and controlled stop using the rear brake. Then, use the markers to lay-out a narrow sharp right and left turn and practice making those turns with gentle rear brake and feathered throttle. After that, use the markers to create a circle with a ø of about 12' to 18' and practice slowly riding within the circle at a slow pace.

Once you feel controlled and comfortable with all these exercises riding solo, progress through each exercise again with your pillion on the bike. Take it slow. You will soon be skilled at performing these exercises and will gain confidence in your two-up riding -- and so will your pillion!

Suggestion: I found that some strength exercises made the two-up stop-and-go physical demands much easier. Essentially, I do calf-raises for my lower legs and squats for my thigh muscles. You can quickly increase the strength in these muscles as you begin to use free-weights with these exercises.

WARNING: As you have probably found out, DO NOT TRY TO "CATCH" THE RT IF IT TILTS >15º-20º. You can seriously hurt yourself!
 

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Kornholio said:
Maybe it's just you. I've never dropped my bike nor felt the RT was "tipsy". Quite the contrary, actually. You probably need to loosen up on the bike. I've noticed that people that ride in a very stiff fashion tend to have a lot of problems controlling their motorcycles at low speed, regardless of the weight of the bike. A large part of why RT's and even big HD cruisers are selected for police service so often is due to their slow speed maneuverability. If you're not comfortable with handling your bike at low speed, practice it incessantly and, even better, take a civilian-geared police riding course. Many sheriff's departments have them and they're a great way to learn how to handle your bike at low speed from the pros.

Try riding in Sport Mode. The reduced diving might help.
Ellie
 

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The RT seat height is adjustable, of course and it's differences in seat heights between the RT and other "things" you've mentioned that made the difference.

Get yours adjusted to suit you.

I can come to a stop at a stop sign without need to put foot down, so the RT is for sure not inherently "tippy."
 

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I also find the RT very tippy at stops. I have dropped it twice (And I am 6'-3") I also have a F800ST which is much easier to handle and which is much better at slow speeds. I guess I will have to spend some more time practicing in parking lots to increase my confidence.
 

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... Bring some tennis balls cut in half as markers and practice coming to a slow and controlled stop using the rear brake....

Good idea with the tennis balls. I once came to a full stop on top of one these markers disks and almost dropped the bike. They are very slippery, even on asphalt.
 

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The RT IS tippy at stops. It does feel top-heavy. More than my previous 1200 GS. And if you're only 5'7" like me, once it starts tipping over, it's either down or you hurt yourself. I've done both recently. But not because of front brake while turning, though this is a well documented cause for dropping the bike. Once, as I was leaving a gravel parking lot doing a U-turn, I hit a soft sand patch both with front wheel AND left foot. Bye-bye! Another time, I had to stop suddenly righ after turning left in another parking lot with a huge incline to the left. My left foot found nothing under it but thin air. Bye-bye again!

And in Montreal, the street surfaces are in such a terrible state of disrepair, that stopping at stop lights or to park on the kerb, is always an adventure. You never know on what hole, crack, depression, mound or patch of gravel you bike or your feet are going to meet. In fact, I just ordered a third party low seat just to ride in-town.
 

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It's you. :D

Try some of these, just be prepared to take a second mortgage out on your house. ;)

http://www.daytona.de/index.php?page=801

Boxers have an incredibly low center of gravity and are much, much less prone to tip overs at slow speeds if ridden well. Much less than v-twins or any other design, period.

Keep your head and chin up when riding slow. Keep off the front brake and while slipping the clutch gently to keep a constant throttle at about 2500 rpm use the REAR brake to modulate your speed. You should be able to do a full lock u-turn at 1 mph two up without even a wobble. It's all about proper technique and using the engine as a gyroscope. It really works.

(except on LT's... :histerica)
 

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I am 5' 11", but have dropped it twice.

1. At a stop sign. Intersection is not even due to change in grade as road meets another road going up in elevation. $$$: about $100 in paint to touch up valve cover plus ~$200 in valve cover protectors.

2. At Costco before gassing up: heard (but didn't see) the stand engage. $$$: $10 for a peg feeler. A small scratch on left valve cover protector.
 
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