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Discussion Starter #1
I love my 2006 ABS intergraded brakes, but do have one question. Is there a difference if i use the Hand brake or the foot brake in the way it's actuated? I've tried to feel if there is, but can't really tell.
Also, is their a way to make the system use only "ONE" brake, i.e. the rear. Some slow speed maneuvers suggest you use the rear brake only for performing them correctly. I've finally mastered slow speed U-turns using the "slip clutch, engine rev technique, but some also say that you should slightly use the rear brake.
 

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Wrencher Extraordinaire
2005 K1200LT
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In a nut shell grab full lever or full foot brake and you will get maximum braking from both front and rear. You can trail brake as a "slight" (and that is subjective) amount of pressure on the peddle will only activate the rear brake. But anything above "slight" will get both. It is a great system as I have had to apply full braking, two up and pulling a 350 lb Bushtec trailer @ 65 MPH and she made a lot of noise but sopped straight and true. I did like the split system I had on the GS as I could use full rear only while front activated both.

For the U turn I would avoid the rear brake until you can master the "slight" application. Any front brake at all in that maneuver will result in a dirt nap.

Enjoy the ride.
 
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IBR# 366
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Re: Integral brake system

As usual, John Z has pretty much nailed it. :bmw:

BMW Motorrad uses the term Integral to refer to the braking system on the 2002 and up K12LT (2001 in Europe/Canada). Technically, that's neither Linked nor Integrated as they don't fall easily into either of those definitions.

These power assisted brakes are controlled by a small processor that varies the front and rear braking forces applied depending on wheel speed, lever forces applied, and other conditions. At driving speeds and normal conditions, you will get a similar response from either the front or rear lever. But at slower speeds, the front brake lever has much more effect on the front wheel and the rear brake can be applied without generating any noticeable force on the front wheel. That's what makes slow-speed u-turns possible with light rear brake application. Add to that the ABS functions, which attempts to limit wheel lockups under heavy braking or in slick conditions, and the power assist, which multiplies the forces exerted by the brake levers onto the calipers.

Some of the older Gold Wings had one front and the rear caliper connected to the rear lever, while the front lever operated the other front caliper. That setup (and linking all calipers to both levers) can easily be accomplished by just rerouting the hydraulic plumbing. Honda's current Linked Braking System uses multi-piston calipers with some brake pistons from each wheel hooked to the front lever and the others hooked to the rear lever, but again this is just a trick of plumbing with no real intelligence or active compensation. The BMW Integral Power ABS unit is a much more sophisticated and active unit that doesn't really fit into those classifications.

So basically what BMW has done is unique in the motorcycle world, and not directly comparable to any other brake system that you may be familiar with. And yes, it just works, very well. :bmw:

There's more good info in this thread, and a detailed description of flushing and bleeding the Integral brakes in this pdf.
 
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Discussion Starter #4
Re: Integral brake system

Thank you Meese. That's the exact information i was looking for. Very informative. Nice to understand how things like that work.
 

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COME ON NOW...iT IS "INTEGRATED" BRAKES!

NOT INTEGRAL OR INTERGRADED :smile:
 
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Discussion Starter #6
i stand corrected
 

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IBR# 366
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According to BMW, it's Integral ABS.

"In the K Series and the flat twin "boxer" models, two different types of the BMW Motorrad Integral ABS are used: the touring bike K 1200 LT is fitted with the ABS with full integral function, while all other models have the part integral function. "

Linked or Integrated brakes as used by other manufacturers are a whole different design, with inferior adaptive braking capabilities...
 
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