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Discussion Starter #1
I bought a used center stand assembly and modified it to be about 35MM shorter. I just completed the project so the "Jury" is still deliberating the outcome.

Reason: To reduce the effort required when placing it on the center stand.
(Don't worry all you ctitics out there, I still have the original stand)

Concern one: If I had it to do over, I would have not made it so short. Maybe 20MM instead of 35MM

Reason: The bike now has the equivelent of a Ride Off" stand. I can get on it while on the center stand, put it into gear and ride (gently) away. It's like going over a small speed bump.

Observation: With the reduced height, I can place the bike up onto the center stand simply by standing on the center stand lever. Goes right up.

Concern two: About falling of the center stand forward. I am not sure yet. Initial impression is that it is still pretty stable.

Concern three: The center stand was cut and welded in 3 placed, both vertical legs and the horizontal bar. To offset this, there were solid steel bars machine to match the I.D. of the hollow tubed. (hollow tubes were also machine out a bit to match the steel bars)

Gonna try it for a while, I may add some material on the 3 pads (2 on the center stand and one on the lever arm) to raise it back up a bit to get the rear wheel elevated above ground. May also get too nervous and put the original back on.

Time will tell.
 

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Hey Dave,
Its been time, do tell. What about it? How do you like that drive off centerstand? Have you experimented with a reduction of 20mm less than stock, as in your first concern with the centerstand project? :wave
Lemme know,
Don Miller
 

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I know you have the manual stand and the frame geometry changed in around "05 '06 but with our Wilburs shocks, the powered stand could not be any shorter due to wheel clearance when extended. Sounds like a good idea though. Can you still remove the rear wheel ?
Cheers
 

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While I appreciate your efforts, I think you are trying to engineer a solution to a problem when there really isn't a problem.

Getting any LT the center stand is easy if you do these two things, and riding off the center stand is a simple matter of a quick weight shift.

1. Service the preload adjuster (15 minutes)

The hydraulic preload adjuster on your LT or RT 'can' cause a problem with ride height. I've found several RT rear shocks that have lost their original range of adjustment. What happens is the hydraulic jack oil in the preload circuit seems to evaporate just a little over time. (my note: the hose swells) I've refilled 3 of them and restored the full range of adjustment in each case.

The easiest way to test for this is to back off the adjuster knob till you feel the resistance go away. That is the point where the hydraulic adjuster ceases to adjust anything. If the point of no resistance isn't up near the top (soft) end of the adjustment knob, turn the adjuster FULLY counter clockwise and remove the adjuster from it's mounting bracket. Unclip the hose retainers. While holding the adjuster upside down, remove the banjo fitting at the adjuster and keep the hose end vertical so no oil seeps out. Ensure the adjuster is Fully counter clockwise all the way and stick a nylon rod or something similar in the hole where the banjo fitting attaches and push the piston all the way back. Keep the adjuster upside down during this entire process.
Next you add jack oil to the adjuster piston until it runs out. Re-install the banjo fitting (with new crush rings if you can find them but I've never had one leak) and before you tighten the banjo fitting, twist the adjuster knob clockwise about a quarter turn to eliminate any air bubbles.

Check the adjustment range. If you were low on jack oil, it WILL be much better. This may save some folks the price of a new rear shock. I found hydraulic jack oil at my local auto parts store years ago for refilling my floor jacks. This oil is totally separate from the shock absorber function.


(My note: it may be time for a new rear shock, but 95% of the time this makes a dramatic difference.)


2. Learn this technique: (30 seconds)

... grab the left handle bar grip with my left hand and turn it to full left lock. Grab the luggage "grab rail" (passenger grab rail on top of the side hard case) with my right hand, (don't worry, it won't break) face the BACK of the bike, and stand on the extension with my LEFT foot, while standing up straight, back arched with my head level. If you do this properly you'll end up with all of your weight centered on your LEFT foot, right foot dangling in the air. The bike will literally jump up onto the stand.

My wife, Amy, can put my LT up on the center stand - she weighs 120 lbs and is 5'4" tall...



 

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Having been treated to a flat rear tire in the middle of nowhere I can appreciate anything that makes the cycle easier to hoist up onto the stand. For those of you who haven't experienced this, a loaded bike with a flat rear tire won't stay on the side stand and is almost impossible to put on the center stand with one person. If you don't have someone to help, you wind up standing by the cycle balancing it as you dig a hole in the gravel shoulder with your boot heel for the side stand. Good times. Then you find a big flat rock to ride the back wheel onto which raises it high enough so you can put her on the center stand. My trip gear now includes a short 2x4.
Regarding how much to cut the stand down, if you measure the original height of the rear tire off the pavement, (ie 1.5 inches), the distance to cut off the center stand will be a percentage of that height measured in how far the center stand sets towards the rear wheel in the wheel base. For example a 74 inch wheel base with a 1.5 inch rise would need to be shortened 3/4 inch if the center stand contact point is exactly 1/2 the distance from the front tire contact point to the rear tire contact point. That will put the rear tire on the pavement without loading the suspension. Personally, I think you're on to something.
:)
 

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davek1 said:
Reason: The bike now has the equivelent of a Ride Off" stand. I can get on it while on the center stand, put it into gear and ride (gently) away. It's like going over a small speed bump.

.
Not sure why this is any different than the stock center stand. With the bike on the stock stand I simply stand on the left side foot peg, throw my right leg over the saddle and get comfortably seated. Fire up the engine, put'er in 1st gear, rock froward and ease out the clutch and add a little throttle as the wheels touch down and off I go. Been using this technique on both my LT and GS for a long time.
 

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The shortening of the stock centre stand is one the the things which has been done for goldwing owners for some time. They also use the reverse to put it onto the stand.
From all the reports this Ride Off Stand works like a dream.

Having once pulled muscles in my hip getting a 1800 Goldwing onto the centre stand I can well appreciate anyone not taking the risk with normal stands and heavy touring bike.
The later LT solved this problem.
I 'm considering purchasing the 1200Rt or Lt and this is certainly something that I will do. Would make a good line for some small firm of engineers?
 

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Seems to me it would make it difficult to rotate the front and rear tires to get to the valve stem to check air and also it would be difficult to roll out the rear wheel for a tire change? :eek:
 

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Discussion Starter #9
The bike does now rest on both tires when on the center stand.

A flat tire would be a major issue. Would need to put something under the center stand to elevate for a tire change.

However, I can now place the bike onto the centerstand while still sitting on it. This is a MAJOR convenience.

And, I can simply climb onto it and ride off. Feels kind of like going over a speed bump.

If I had to do it over (and I might), I would not shorten it so much. Maybe only one inch. That would give me enough height to still have the rear wheel off the ground.

One more thing.
IF the bike was easy to get onto the center stand, BMW would not have gone through the effort to design a hydraulic center stand. I work for a German company, with German engineers who have owned and riden BMW's and have told me that they could easily put my LT onto its center stand. I walked them to the bike and said "Go ahead" and the end result was that they could not. To be sure, you (I) can put the bike onto the centerstand but it is not easy.
 

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Part of servicing the bike is removing the centerstand, checking the O-rings, and greasing the bushings. When I first got my bike (2000 LT) I knew nothing about this. At 6'3" and 210lbs, I could not get my bike on the centerstand. I could stand on the foot pedal with all my weight, yanking and pulling without any luck. Then one day, while trying my futile exercise one more time, the bike fell on its right side. I wasn't happy. I put the bike back on the sidestand and started walking away. I looked back and noticed the side stand hitting the ground when it should have been up. I walked back and looked under the bike only to find that I had broken the centerstand cross tube literally creating two separate centerstand legs.

Long story short, I found a used stand on ebay and replaced the bushings and o-rings (new grease too). Now the bike is super easy to get on the stand. The difference was NIGHT and DAY!

The centerstand can be removed with the bike on the sidestand. Obviously, be careful! There are circlips on the bolts that seem to serve no purpose other than to keep the centerstand bolts from being overtightened thus creating binding with the stand. I removed them before removing the centerstand bolts.

One IMPORTANT thing to know is that the centerstand bolts are installed using blue loctite. Heat is required to remove them. There are rubber o-rings on the centerstand bushings. If you overheat the bolts, you will ruin the o-rings. I used a propane torch and heated ONLY the threaded part of the bolt! If you look up from under the centerstand in the center of the bike you can see the threaded holes where the bolts reside. HEAT THERE ONLY! Do not heat the head of the bolt, and do not try to remove the bolts without heating, you WILL strip the hex head!

Replace any questionable parts, grease, and reassemble. You might be amazed at the difference! I was. Even if this doesn't fix you centerstand woes, it's a cheap and easy place to start.

Cheers
 

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bigwingboy said:
Part of servicing the bike is removing the centerstand, checking the O-rings, and greasing the bushings. When I first got my bike (2000 LT) I knew nothing about this. At 6'3" and 210lbs, I could not get my bike on the centerstand. I could stand on the foot pedal with all my weight, yanking and pulling without any luck. Then one day, while trying my futile exercise one more time, the bike fell on its right side. I wasn't happy. I put the bike back on the sidestand and started walking away. I looked back and noticed the side stand hitting the ground when it should have been up. I walked back and looked under the bike only to find that I had broken the centerstand cross tube literally creating two separate centerstand legs.

Long story short, I found a used stand on ebay and replaced the bushings and o-rings (new grease too). Now the bike is super easy to get on the stand. The difference was NIGHT and DAY!

The centerstand can be removed with the bike on the sidestand. Obviously, be careful! There are circlips on the bolts that seem to serve no purpose other than to keep the centerstand bolts from being overtightened thus creating binding with the stand. I removed them before removing the centerstand bolts.

One IMPORTANT thing to know is that the centerstand bolts are installed using blue loctite. Heat is required to remove them. There are rubber o-rings on the centerstand bushings. If you overheat the bolts, you will ruin the o-rings. I used a propane torch and heated ONLY the threaded part of the bolt! If you look up from under the centerstand in the center of the bike you can see the threaded holes where the bolts reside. HEAT THERE ONLY! Do not heat the head of the bolt, and do not try to remove the bolts without heating, you WILL strip the hex head!

Replace any questionable parts, grease, and reassemble. You might be amazed at the difference! I was. Even if this doesn't fix you centerstand woes, it's a cheap and easy place to start.

Cheers
I took the O-rings out and installed grease zerks like on my 85K. Quick shot of grease at every oil change and problem is solved.

Roy
 

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I love easy!

Picture please!

Thank you!

Loren

bigbear said:
I took the O-rings out and installed grease zerks like on my 85K. Quick shot of grease at every oil change and problem is solved.

Roy
 

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bigbear said:
I took the O-rings out and installed grease zerks like on my 85K. Quick shot of grease at every oil change and problem is solved.

Roy
I've had that idea rolling around in my head for quite some time. Plan on doing it when the riding season is over.
 
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