BMW Luxury Touring Community banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
59 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have a 2000 LT that I've owned since 2003 and I've just now started doing my own basic maintenance. I am always working on my dirt bikes and have not had the time nor desire to tear in the LT. I was always putting it the shop.

On my list of things to do was to 1) replace the broken abs sensor ring 2) change the engine oil 3) replace the front brake pads 4) change the tranny and differential oil and 5) change the coolant.

Here are a couple of observations and things I learned.

1. changing the oil wasn't too bad of a process. It would have been nice to know up front that the oil filter sits in the sump. I removed that cover before I had the pan in place and I got oil all over my patio.

2. The oil filter cap removal thingy at Autozone fit perfectly. Size "B" is what I used and I didn't need to buy the one from the dealer.

3. I was a bit nervous about crawling underneath the bike. It worked out. I don't have a lift that will support the LT, so there's no other way.

4. getting to drain bolt for the tranny fluid was a pain. I had to remove the bracket for the exhaust to get to it. Then it required a 14mm hex bolt which I had to go buy. Next time, I will not remove all the body work. I will only remove the right foot peg. Oh, I cut out the rubber matt like it said to do in the manual, but the oil didn't drain straight down and there was spillage. Good think I put the sheet of plywood down on the ground first.

5. changing the differential fluid was easy.

6. the front wheel came off easy once I put a small jack and a block of wood beneath the engine. I was then able to remove the front brake disks to get off the front brake calipers. What a PITA! I must have been doing something wrong. Changing the pads was easy. It took me about 30 mins to realize that the pin holding the brakes pads in the caliper did not screw out. I used a punch to push it out.

7. btw... OEM brakes are expensive as hell (almost $400 for the front). I thought about aftermarket, but I think that this is only the second set of brake pads in 70K miles. I wanted to make sure that the ones I put on lasted as long as what I already had on there.

8. reassembling the front wheel, putting the brake disks were a pain, but I got it done. I replaced the abs ring also and set the abs sensor gap like the book said to do. No problem. (btw... please remember to remove your front brake disk lock before you attempt to drive off. It will damage the abs sensor ring. )

9. Went to remove the temperature sensor in the water pump housing to drain the coolant and it snapped in two. Its not leaking, but its stuck in there.I need to figure out how to get it out of there. It hasn't worked properly for years and should have been changed out a long time ago. Now I have my work cut out for me to extract it.

10. After removing the lower part of the body work and putting it all back together, i only ended up with 1 leftover screew. I cannot figure out where it goes.

Otherwise, it looks good....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
i too do my own maintenance and the Clymer manual is great for information. I overcame the oil issue by going down to the hardware store and buying a plastic drain pan for hot water heaters. It's about 2.5 feet in diameter and can catch all the oil from the BMW. Then i just drain it backinto an oil container with a funnel.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
835 Posts
Good Job. I too do my own maintenance. zen and the art of motorcycle maintenance
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,137 Posts
mauricedorris said:
(SNIP) 6. the front wheel came off easy once I put a small jack and a block of wood beneath the engine. I was then able to remove the front brake disks to get off the front brake calipers. What a PITA! I must have been doing something wrong. Changing the pads was easy. It took me about 30 mins to realize that the pin holding the brakes pads in the caliper did not screw out. I used a punch to push it out.

7. btw... OEM brakes are expensive as hell (almost $400 for the front). I thought about aftermarket, but I think that this is only the second set of brake pads in 70K miles. I wanted to make sure that the ones I put on lasted as long as what I already had on there.

8. reassembling the front wheel, putting the brake disks were a pain, but I got it done. (Snip)...
The Brake disks do not need to come off. You simply unbolt the calipers from the forks, and then work them back and forth in order to get the pads recessed enough to roll them off the disks.

HTH in the future, and congrats on tackling the work yourself!

John
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,165 Posts
$400 for front brakes??????????????

Did you have to replace the rotors in addition to the pads? I never had to replace the front rotors, only the rear, once in 120,000 miles.

Ditto on not removing the rotors to remove the pads. Twist the caliper to left and right to retract the pistons in the calipers
 

·
Old Slow Guy in A Fast Car
Joined
·
8,601 Posts
dshealey said:
$400 for front brakes??????????????

Did you have to replace the rotors in addition to the pads? I never had to replace the front rotors, only the rear, once in 120,000 miles.

Ditto on not removing the rotors to remove the pads. Twist the caliper to left and right to retract the pistons in the calipers
I put BMW Premium Brake pads on the front of my LT & both sets cost about $150.00 together.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,740 Posts
When it comes to the LT, I have found this site to be a gold mine in knowledge. It has saved me both time and money on simple repairs, trouble shooting issues and ideas.

Well, it has also a small fortune with all of the ideas for trips and farkles. Keep coming back!

If, after a while, you find yourself coming here daily, please be kind and send in a donation to keep the lights on.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,882 Posts
The water cooler drain plug / temp sensor is only in very loose - 9Nm, so you should be able to get the remains out if you can get any grip on it at all, even a small notch and small screwdriver should do it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,746 Posts
Great job MauriceDoris! Now that you are a motorcycle mechanic it's time to purchase a helper!

I figure that with the maintenance you've done on your bike without taking it t o the dealer you have saved about $1,000,000! Take some of the money you have saved and buy yourself an air over hydraulic 1200 lb lift from Harbor Freight. It will be the best $500 you will ever spend! No more oil on the patio and no laying on the ground to do the work!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,121 Posts
You will get better on the maintenance the more you do it. The worst for me is that damn exhaust bracket! While a bit convoluted I think it is the price we pay for a fully covered bike.

Yes you have to be precise on that drain chute you make for the tranny, and you must hold it and your mouth just right and believe me, most of us get spillage.

The oil thing was one of the first things I learned and yes I did get it it was a sump system. You wont make the mistake again.

On the coolant John Z warned me to leave the sensor alone and just break the lower hose. I used a Might Vac to suck what was left in the pump and rear overflow. It has been reported a bunch to leave the sensor alone.

Sounds like you got er done and all is well. Next adventure out use the search here and it may help you. I know anything I do I spend time here searching about it.

Congratulations on doing your own maintenance and you saved a bunch of money, got to use the products of your choice, and know it is done right.

Good job, now ride the dill out of her !
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
533 Posts
I bought a set of DVD's made by a member of this site when I purchased my first LT in 03. Paul Sayegh makes them and I highly recomend them,

LT DVD
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top