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Discussion Starter #1
Just a rant everyone. is there anyone out there also not liking the way the ignition switch is set up. I've often locked my handle bars and found a few hours past that i'd turned the key one click too far, and left the parking lights on. This isn't much of a problem at night as you can easily see the lights, but during the day, it can be quite embarrassing to come out to your bike to a dead battery.
I guess what i'd like to know, is if anyone has figured out a way to eliminate the parking lights coming on at this position. I don't actually see a use for it myself.
 

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maybe just put a mark on the plastic, or a red dot @ the "do not stop key here"

You could probably pull the ign switch, find the wires for that and disconnect them
 

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I've never actually killed the battery doing it, but I have left the ignition in the park light position.

I think if it can be done, the suggestion to disconnect the wires at the ignition switch is a good idea. Then if you live in a place where parking lights are required you can hook the wires to a switch of your choosing. Probably want that one hidden.
 

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Just a rant everyone. is there anyone out there also not liking the way the ignition switch is set up. I've often locked my handle bars and found a few hours past that i'd turned the key one click too far, and left the parking lights on. This isn't much of a problem at night as you can easily see the lights, but during the day, it can be quite embarrassing to come out to your bike to a dead battery.
I guess what i'd like to know, is if anyone has figured out a way to eliminate the parking lights coming on at this position. I don't actually see a use for it myself.
I did that exactly once. Now I turn the bars, turn the key to lock and then visually confirm the right position as I remove the key. Problem solved.
 
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I have come back to my k100rs to find a dead battery from using the kill switch and not turning the key off.

dead battery in an hour. but not to bad to push start, unlike the LT.
Now I make it a habit to walk in front and look at the headlight when I get off.
 

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I have come back to my k100rs to find a dead battery from using the kill switch and not turning the key off.

dead battery in an hour. but not to bad to push start, unlike the LT.
Now I make it a habit to walk in front and look at the headlight when I get off.
I never use the kill switch or side stand to shut off the engine. The ignition switch was designed for that purpose for a reason. Then again, it never hurts to admire your LT as you walk away...
 
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I never use the kill switch or side stand to shut off the engine.
I know, a bit off topic but I have to comment. I ALWAYS use the side stand to shut off the engine. This assures that the side stand is down when I finally decide to dismount. Key off, gloves off, gps off, helmet off. I am one of those that was a quick learner re turning the key beyond off to park light position.
 

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I know, a bit off topic but I have to comment. I ALWAYS use the side stand to shut off the engine. This assures that the side stand is down when I finally decide to dismount. Key off, gloves off, gps off, helmet off. I am one of those that was a quick learner re turning the key beyond off to park light position.
To each his own. As an engineer, I tend to operate machines as the designer intended them to be operated. I am not aware of any difference on the LT, but on some machines the emergency shutdown mechanisms are much harsher than the normal mechanism.

For example, I designed industrial automation and control systems. During normal shutdowns we did things like decelerate motors gradually to avoid heavy loads on bearings and mechanisms. We closed valves at a controlled rate to avoid stresses on pipes (water hammer). We wrote cache to the hard drives before shutting down the processor and memory. And on and on. In contrast, if an operator hit the E-stop button we just cut power to everything. Motors stopped as quickly as inertia allowed or in some cases brakes were slammed on. Valves slammed open or shut based on their design. And so on. Very hard on the equipment.

I am not aware of any such issues with the LT, but it is just my habit to assume the designers know their machine better than I and may well have shutdown procedures related to the ignition switch that aren't invoked by the kill switch or safety interlocks.
 

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To each his own. As an engineer, I tend to operate machines as the designer intended them to be operated. I am not aware of any difference on the LT, but on some machines the emergency shutdown mechanisms are much harsher than the normal mechanism.

For example, I designed industrial automation and control systems. During normal shutdowns we did things like decelerate motors gradually to avoid heavy loads on bearings and mechanisms. We closed valves at a controlled rate to avoid stresses on pipes (water hammer). We wrote cache to the hard drives before shutting down the processor and memory. And on and on. In contrast, if an operator hit the E-stop button we just cut power to everything. Motors stopped as quickly as inertia allowed or in some cases brakes were slammed on. Valves slammed open or shut based on their design. And so on. Very hard on the equipment.

I am not aware of any such issues with the LT, but it is just my habit to assume the designers know their machine better than I and may well have shutdown procedures related to the ignition switch that aren't invoked by the kill switch or safety interlocks.
Having just burned out the kill switch on my LT with a non standard relay and having to troubleshoot the issue, I can say that all the interlocks kill the12V feed to the emergency shut off relay to stop the engine running, same as the key. The ignition switch provides 12V through the right multi function switch to engage the emergency shutdown relay and the interlock system so the effect is the same no matter how you shut the engine off. Some like to use the side stand, some the kill switch and others the key. I do find dropping the stand while in gear handy in some cases as the bike will not roll against the engine and I can let go of the brakes to tend to other matters like key, helmet, intercom etc. They all do exactly the same thing and deactivate the emergency shut off relay as it has an always hot battery feed. In the instance of the LT, it doesn't matter how you do it.
 

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In contrast, if an operator hit the E-stop button we just cut power to everything. Motors stopped as quickly as inertia allowed or in some cases brakes were slammed on. Valves slammed open or shut based on their design. And so on. Very hard on the equipment.
I operate a paper coating machine that has these exact features you describe. There are normal shutdown sequences, then there are emergency shutdown sequences. If shutdown improperly on a frequent basis, I could destroy a carrier felt. I have seen drive belts disintegrate in these conditions. In contrast, I don't see these risks with the LT.... But I have been wrong before.
 

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I operate a paper coating machine that has these exact features you describe. There are normal shutdown sequences, then there are emergency shutdown sequences. If shutdown improperly on a frequent basis, I could destroy a carrier felt. I have seen drive belts disintegrate in these conditions. In contrast, I don't see these risks with the LT.... But I have been wrong before.
I am not aware of any issues with the LT either, it is just my philosophy to do things as the manufacturer intended and cultivate that habit. Whether in engineering, flying, shooting, whatever I do, I try to learn to do things the way the manufacturer intended and then train until it is habit. This works with almost everything in life.

A variation on the "train like you fight and you will fight like you train" mantra.
:smile:
 
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I never use the kill switch or side stand to shut off the engine. The ignition switch was designed for that purpose for a reason. Then again, it never hurts to admire your LT as you walk away...
I like to leave my bike in gear when I park it.
Both feet on the ground, clutch and front brake engaged.
I need one more hand. :wink:

The LT is easy, Radio off = key off
 

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I like to leave my bike in gear when I park it.
Both feet on the ground, clutch and front brake engaged.
I need one more hand. :wink:

The LT is easy, Radio off = key off
There is a neat feature in front of the right foot peg that allows you to apply at least the rear brake with your foot.
:smile:

All kidding aside, in Corning, NY at least, you can fail your road test if you stop at a light with both feet down. I was driving the examiner behind a colleague taking bus test who moved here from Germany. He was taking his test for his US license. He pulled to the first stop light and put both feet down. The examiner said to me "I could fail him for that." He passed the test as he is a very good rider, but the examiner mentioned it during the debrief. He said NY wants to see you stop in balance, not wobbling, and put down your left foot and kept your right on the brake to hold the bike. First I'd heard of that, but that is how I stop generally anyway.

I stop in neutral as I often use the EHCS. If I decide to use the sidestand, I put the LT in gear before deploying the stand and then roll the bike forward to remove driveline lash before placing on the sidestand. Many LT's have enough slop to let the bike roll forward enough to fold the sidestand even when in gear. Try it sometime to see if your LT is one of them. Roll the bike back against the engine, put down the side stand, now roll forward and see how far back the sidestand moves before you hit engine resistance again. You may be surprised...
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Funny you should mention that Voyager. Quite a few years ago when i lived in Kentucky, i actually got a ticket for not coming to a complete stop at a stop sign, even though i know absolutely that i had stopped. The officer said that i did NOT, because both my feet were not on the ground. I tried to argue the ticket in front of the judge, but of course lost. So i went to traffic school to avoid lost points. Funny how laws differ in different states.
 

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Funny you should mention that Voyager. Quite a few years ago when i lived in Kentucky, i actually got a ticket for not coming to a complete stop at a stop sign, even though i know absolutely that i had stopped. The officer said that i did NOT, because both my feet were not on the ground. I tried to argue the ticket in front of the judge, but of course lost. So i went to traffic school to avoid lost points. Funny how laws differ in different states.
I was quite surprised by the examiner's comment. I tend to stop and drop my left foot first, but then put my right down also. With a passenger on back, it is easy for them to shift a little and throw off your balance. If I am on a hill, I do use my right foot to hold the brake so that my throttle hand isn't doing double duty as I pull away when the light turns green.

The really ironic part is that Uli was riding a highly modified Ducati that he takes often to track days. And he was licensed in Germany which is probably second only to Japan in difficulty of getting an unrestricted license. Uli rides better than probably 98% of American riders yet had a NY bureaucrat critiquing his technique. I had to work hard not to laugh when the examiner said that.
:surprise:
 
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The parking lights on my R1200RT 2016 come on when ignition switch is turned on and go out when turned to off. If I want to keep the parking lights on I have to immediately after turning Ignition switch off, push and hold left turn signal switch. Turn ignition on and off to cancel. My 09 1300 GT was the same way.
 
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