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Discussion Starter #1
Anyone here ever replace the cabinets and sink in their kitchen w/out professional help (I'm cheap..sometimes) doesn't look too hard....but is it???

Mike
 

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It depends upon what you mean by without professional help.

I redid my kitchen about 8 years ago. We took a basic layout of the kitchen to Home Depot and used their design services to layout the new kitchen. We purchased the cabinets and countertops from them. I hired a couple of the facility guys from work to help me demo the existing kitchen and to install the new cabinets. I also hired a local drywall guy to matchup the new ceiling with the old. I did the electrical, plumbing, and flooring installation myself (its' legal in Texas if you're working on your own home). All in all, it took about 6 weeks with most of the work concentrated on two different weekends. The new kitchen cost about 1/2 of what a contractor had estimated.

Like you said, most of the work isn't too difficult. The work will go much easier if you have someone to help with the installation, in my experience I wouldn't recommend using your wife. There are a number of online sites where you can get tips on how to install the cabinets and the sink. I would read over several to get a good idea of how difficult the job is before deciding to tackle the job.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks-


I going in----I'll update ya'll...it is only the cabinets as I've done the floors and almost never mess with electric.

Mike
 

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I replaced my kitchen cabinets myself and it was not all that hard. I replaced them with the same size cabinets that came with the house. Just used a stud finder, some shims, wood screws, level, etc. Original cabinets had particle board, stapled drawer sides. new ones are solid wood or plywood, dovetailed drawer sides, invisible drawer slides that automatically close the drawers when they are about 2 inches open. Had a Corian top and sink measured and installed for me. Took me a bout a week to do the job with my then 14 year old son holding stuff. Installed the old cabinets in the laundry room! Not too bad a job, just take your time. It helps to have a catalog of cabinet sizes if you are going to make changes. I installed a 2X4 along the wall, leveled, and installed the cabinets on top of it, then removed the 2X4. The back slash was then tiled
 

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Pretty easy job, cabinets.
To install the wall cabinets, I put a 2X4 on top of a scissor jack on top of the base cabs.........................(don't forget to protect finishes)
The wall cab. then goes on the 2X and I can crank it into place tight to the ceiling.....
 

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Well, since you asked. I built all of the cabinets, installed them, and all the appliances in this kitchen.



Details here: http://www.jacara.com/kitchen/

Oh, and to answer your question. No, it's not hard. Advance planning is crucial, like having a good understanding of the inside dimension of your sink cab, so you can maximize the size of the sink. Also, plan to spend more time than you think shimming lower cabs level, and upper cabs shimmed vertical and square. You can count on not having any flat or straight walls, or 90 degree corners. So plan on that from the get go.

Feel free to ping me with any questions.

Cheers,
-joel
 

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Very nice, Joel!
 

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Great looking Job Joel. Being a woodworker, I can appreciate your craftsmanship.

I hear ya Grif...I gotta a Craftsman tablesaw I hate. Too much vibration. Can't keep the blade aligned; fence sucks (and it's one of their better ones), and can't keep the pully on the motor (always slinging it across the garage). At least it ain't cut me ...yet.
 

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Thanks a bunch guys. Having patience isn't nearly as important as having a patient wife. She cooked our meals for 9 months in an improvised kitchen on the rear deck of our home.

Having the right tools is a pleasure, and good machines last a lifetime. I made the investment years ago and never looked back.

Here's my TS, a seriously farkled Delta Unisaw.


Excalibur fence and overarm guard with integrated dust collection.

Here's what the machine room end of the shop looked like in the basement of our NY home. Spent 2 years building this shop, used it for one, then we moved to AZ.


Now all that equipment is all pushed into the center of one bay of our garage in our new home waiting for me to build yet another shop. :( This will be the third shop I've set up. The first one was in CA. I don't think anything will beat the NY set up though. That was a walk-about basement with glass sliders and windows overlooking the Hudson River.

Cheers,
-joel
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thank for all the hints !!!


I bought the cabinets (same size) yesterday-then removed all the old ones...I not saving them as they are OEM from a 1959 house :eek: :eek: . They are in the front yard waiting for trash day or the inevitable scavengers.

I just got home from work and plan on hanging the upper sets-I found that 5 milk crates stacked up is about 53.5 inches..need 54, but I think in cahoots with the 2 x 4 suggested it just may work!!

Believe it or not I gave away my radial arm craftsman saw to make room for the LT when I got her...I wish I had it now.

The thing I think I'm most anxious about is cutting the hole in the countertop for the sink..we shall see.

Nice work Joel....way outta my league :D :D :D

Thanks again-I'll update progress or lack thereof!!

Mike
 

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Thanks, Mike.

Ditch the milk crates. I believe what Dave was referring to is this. Screw the 2x4 to the wall studs. Personally, I usually 1x4 strapping, but either material is fine. Spend as much time as necessary to get it exactly level. Then rest the cabinets on this temporary ledger and screw them in. It helps to have another set of hands, but I've done it alone. Keep the cabinet against the wall with one hand, operate the power screwdriver with the other (which is of course an essential tool.) Take down the ledger, then patch the holes, or don't bother because you're probably going to tile the backsplash anyway.

-joel
 

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cutting the hole for the sink is easy.........................
assuming p-lam. surface:
Use a fine (multi-tooth) blade in your saw............................
plenty of masking where the saw will ride on the countertop surface........
drill a hole in the corner of the opening to be cut out and go for it.................
 

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Discussion Starter #15
OK Guys-

The milk crates actually worked great (1st Time back) I put a 1/2 in. shelf on top of them and it made 54" exactly!! Just set them on top and drilled.

Starfighter ..you were right- I thought I had to cut perfect curves for the corners-wrong I was and so much easier.

Now I'm ceramic tiling the walls around the cabinets....Mona will not stop piling up the to-do lists.....HELP :D :D :D :D

Thanks Again All-

Mike
 

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shadowofshoe said:
The milk crates actually worked great (1st Time back) I put a 1/2 in. shelf on top of them and it made 54" exactly!! Just set them on top and drilled.
Note that you made them parallel to the floor that way, so they're only as level as your floor is. I trust nothing in an existing structure, like I mentioned in my first post. That's why I set my own levels using the method described. But I freely admit to being pretty anal about these things. ;)

Congrats on your progress.

-joel
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Joel-

I Paid large attention to leveling and shimming..I would not have....until I read your posts ...I'm a complete rookie-so I may have seen it-Then I would be compelled to fix it :D :D :D

Mike
 
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