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i got a 2001 r1100rt last may and put over 5,000 miles on it in 3 months. in sept. my right wrist became stiff and painful. due to repairs, i didn't ride the bike for 4 months. my wrist got a little better, but now that i'm riding again, i'm having wrist issues again. i was wondering if bar raisers might help, any suggestions?
thanks
 

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Risers/bar backs can help. I don't know you, of course, but exercise can help, too. A least that's what my doc told me. He was right.
 

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This is only speculation on my part ---- However, have you considered that the origin of your discomfort may reside elsewhere? Specifically, for example, over utilization of the "Shift Cap" key on you computer?
 

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I'm going to toss in here and tell you that the problem and solution probably lies in the way you sit the bike.

If you are supporting your upper body with your wrists, then you have identified the problem. When done correctly you ought to be able to lift both hands off the grips slightly and your body does not move and neither does the bike. For that matter neither does the muscle group used to hold your upper body...

It is called "Soft Hands".

People who frequent this forum will not be surprised to hear me recommend the Master Yoda Riding Position (MYRP). I know you think I am goofy on this subject but it works every time it is tried... if you work at it. Unfortunately it is not a trick, or switch you turn. It takes re-training your body (and mind). Took me a year to finally get it.

MYRP is can be found with a google search.
 

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The grips on all BMW motorbikes were made for small children, midgets, or the occasional hobbit, try the bar backs and fatter grips. If the narrow minded germans could think out of the box, (a real seat, grips, bar backs, better service. ) then they might not be going tit's up in the US.
 

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mwood7800 said:
The grips on all BMW motorbikes were made for small children, midgets, or the occasional hobbit, try the bar backs and fatter grips. If the narrow minded germans could think out of the box, (a real seat, grips, bar backs, better service. ) then they might not be going tit's up in the US.
Easy solution.........buy a Harley.
 

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You really should think about what I said earlier.
I will try to be brief. When I went from H-D to BMW I had the sore wrists too, and my back hurt.
I added the riser/barbacks... thought I found the solution then I had pain in a different place of my back and my wrists.
Then I studied MYRP.
Things got better and better. End of riding season here in Utah and basically laid it up for 3 or 4 months. Then new season began... pain back. I checked my habits and realized I had drifted back. Re-applied MYRP. That was several years ago. I diligently learned how to sit the bike and I also started with exercise program and muscle strength routines. I am 67 years old. All is better now.

Here is the really short and overly edited version. You need to see how it feels to sit on a (bar) stool- feet on rungs and lean forward like on the bike... hands should be extended forward in mid-air. (go try this if have a stool) Notice you are feeling it in your back, and thighs. That is exactly right. You need to learn how to hold your body so that the weight is not on your hands but supported by your back and thighs.

One other thing. Get on your bike and grip the grips. as you do when riding. Look down and see where the outer part of either hand rests on the grip. If the outer part is resting on the grip in the space somewhere between the base of the little finger and the "bump" at the base of your hand/wrist then you might try rotating your right hand counter-clock wise and the opposite for your left hand. This action will reveal a V-shape in the space between the base of your thumb and the knuckle of the first finger. This has another effect as well. It displaces you elbows outward. Do you ever watch MotoGP? Ben Spies is nicknamed "Elbows" for some mysterious reason. Ha- just look at how he leans forward and his elbows are way out. That is good. There is very little weight on his hands. He uses them for something else, not supporting his body.

Typing this is waay more complicated than it really is. Try it out and sit on the bike with very light pressure on the grips... Soft Hands... that is what you want.

The diameter of the grip is irrelevant.

Soft hands also means you are steering your bike with your thighs and feet as much as by turning the bars. I know you think I am crazy and you are not the first. I can tell you that the many people I have helped learn this lesson ride better, with no pain, and can go all day long and feel refreshed at the end.

Or, you can just buy some risers and learn it all the hard way. Mine are for sale.
 

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Good Day!

So much advice here that is sound. And works different depending on body type. My two cents,,, Being relaxed but yet keeping good body form. Head, neck, shoulders and arms to name a few. For me making sure I not only had soft hands but my wrist were in a more neutral position as well. In 2006 when I got my Rt it took awhile for me to dial it in just right.
Good luck!!


Tony 2006 Rt

A few others while I was younger.
 

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hopz said:
Soft hands also means you are steering your bike with your thighs and feet as much as by turning the bars. Or, you can just buy some risers and learn it all the hard way. Mine are for sale.
My wife had horses for years and rode English style. The "Yoda" position sounds a lot like the way people who ride English control their horses.

So, it sounds like you removed the risers after perfecting the position?

Regards,
 

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Not being a very experienced rider (different bikes) I've never known the wrist issue. Only been on cruiser and then r1200rt.

I have vario risers which have assisted in sitting more upright (short arms) and a huge difference in my neck/shoulders.

Until 2 weeks ago.

Got a loan bike Suzuki 650 and after 15 km could not believe how sore my wrists got!

I practice soft hands and yoda, and with risers have no challenges. Maybe a combination of all

Note:the risers also bring the reach back towards me so makes a big difference.
 

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I am having problems also after many years of riding. 2 different problems. Right writst right where the wrist bends, on the outside it is painful I think because of the angle of the bars that my hand is slightly cocked outward that over years of throttling I have worn something down in there. 2nd problem and more serious is my left clutch arm. Thgis started on a trip to WV last fall. Thought it would go away after 5 months of not riding. First day out and it is still there. Pull in the clutch and I get a shooting pain straight up thru my elbow into my outer bicep. I lift weights several times a week, no pain. I can do everything else and never feel pain. Pull in the damn clutch and OH MY GOSH. I can't ride if this keeps up. Any doctors in the house????
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Cessna... yes I took the risers off.

Truth be told I have put them on and taken them off several times. I used to put them on before long trips just to see if they would work better. After the first mile they seemed better with the risers... after the 50th mile I could not wait to get home and take them back off.

I have thought about this subject for a long time because I had the same problem. Back pain, wrist pain shoulder pain. I talked with Dick Franz, who wrote MYRP and discussed all the ins/outs with my favorite mechanic. All this spread out over several years. I got my first "play" bike several years ago. I added a Ducati to the stable. Loved that bike but my wrists could not deal with it. I got a SV650... same problem. Got the Triumph 995i sprint... same problem.

I was beginning to think the issue was me, not the hardware. I got my body in shape and re-thought, re-read MYRP and after a good bit of work it just came together for me. I can now ride the Triumph hunched over like the proverbial monkey having relations with the football... and no pain. The BMW is just plain comfy.

In a recent thread I talked about the different philosophy of seating between the cruiser style and the for lack of better term- the European style.

Cruisers put you more or less vertically over the seat. Your weight aligns directly OVER the saddle. Your feet project forward and physically carry none of your body's weight. In this style of riding the issue becomes building a saddle easy to sit ON for a long time, and then you position the grips to come back, or up to MEET your hands! All is well. You are basically sitting on a bike that is configured like an EZ chair. Designed for comfort. OBTW in my value system there is nothing "wrong" with this.

In the European style, the weight is not projected down your spine to your butt. It is carried by your lower back and upper thighs, and your feet too, which are now under your thighs and butt and help carry the weight. You lean forward to meet the grips. BUT, and it is a big butt, you do not support your body with your hands!

Just for an experiment... go sit on a cruiser bike and lift your feet off the pegs/foot boards. See, you can just lift them up and you do not fall forward. Now go try that on your BMW. If you press down with your feet- you stand up. Think about this for a while.

None of this has much meaning if you have a medical condition... that changes everything.

Just to be clear... I am not on a crusade here. I am just trying to be helpful. I personally found that (my) solution was not changing the hardware but changing the way I interacted with the hardware.

As they say, Your Actual Mileage may vary... :dance:
 

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Interesting comments Hopz...thanks!

I think that we are all suffering a bit of the same condition too...aging!

Regard,
 

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Good Day!

+1 on the aging!! One thing I see alot of people not doing. Exercise! One of many things is proper core work. I am sure there is a thread on that subject here somewhere.
 

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mwood7800 said:
The grips on all BMW motorbikes were made for small children, midgets, or the occasional hobbit
Don't be absurd.

This is a GERMAN motorcycle.

The grips were designed to fit the elves in the Black Forest.
 

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BTW, as someone who used to routinely get 5 hours daily of actual riding time, I found that the best cure for wrist issues was a grip exerciser -- you know, that big coil spring with two handles. Before starting to ride every morning, I would do 25 squeezes with each hand, twice (back and forth between hands). When I stopped for lunch, same thing, and when I got back to work, do it again before starting to ride. If I began to notice my wrists, I would stop and do it. Within a couple of weeks, the problem was gone and never came back.

This not only strengthens the muscles, it forces the body to improve blood flow through the forearm, wrist and hand. The pain and stiffening problem that you get is when fatigue poisons build up in the muscle tissues -- more blood flow prevents this -- and when your joints "dry out" from being in one position for too long.
 

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I do use the body positioning myself, I have a K bike also and one needs to learn how to ride holding yourself up with your back and legs,not your arms until your air speed holds you up. But that aside, I would like to toss in "grip puppies" a soft overcoat for the grip that enlarges the diameter some and softens them up. But my favorite is the "throttle rocker" a small plastic paddle on the throttle (for that right hand issue) that lets the grip on the throttle relax some. Many people don't like them and there is a safety issue until you get use to it. Sounds stupid I know. But, when conditions amplify being tired, such as cold and rain all day, these little "position" problems amplify and become real issues. I found the little piece of plastic that let me relax my throttle had a little makes a huge difference in a long ride. My favorite one has a patent problem right now and is only available in Europe, it has a slight curve to fit your palm. Its USA brother is flat, or comes with the curve and a cloth attachment which is not so great. But there are various versions of the throttle rocker out there. When I heard a couple of years ago that my favorite was no longer available in the states, I called around and found a Harley shop had a box of them, I bought ten.
Funny how a small change in riding position makes a huge difference too. I had a nasty pain in the back of my neck at the base on the K bike. Got the low seat, changed things by .75" and all was bliss.
 

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Solo6 said:
BTW, as someone who used to routinely get 5 hours daily of actual riding time, I found that the best cure for wrist issues was a grip exerciser -- you know, that big coil spring with two handles. Before starting to ride every morning, I would do 25 squeezes with each hand, twice (back and forth between hands). When I stopped for lunch, same thing, and when I got back to work, do it again before starting to ride. If I began to notice my wrists, I would stop and do it. Within a couple of weeks, the problem was gone and never came back.

This not only strengthens the muscles, it forces the body to improve blood flow through the forearm, wrist and hand. The pain and stiffening problem that you get is when fatigue poisons build up in the muscle tissues -- more blood flow prevents this -- and when your joints "dry out" from being in one position for too long.
I workout with captains of crush grippers and I can't say it has made a difference one way or another, but I don't have wrist issues. Hand numbness, yes. Also, If you can do 25 reps, you are using too light of gripper. You want to have the max be around 12 and you should be doing isometrics with the gripper. Depending on the lbs resistance, 30 seconds to a minute.
 

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Ponch said:
I workout with captains of crush grippers and I can't say it has made a difference one way or another, but I don't have wrist issues. Hand numbness, yes. Also, If you can do 25 reps, you are using too light of gripper. You want to have the max be around 12 and you should be doing isometrics with the gripper. Depending on the lbs resistance, 30 seconds to a minute.
The objective is NOT to build muscle, it's to work the joints, warm the muscles and get the blood flowing. For that you need some resistance, but not enough that you are fighting it.
 

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Solo6 said:
The objective is NOT to build muscle, it's to work the joints, warm the muscles and get the blood flowing. For that you need some resistance, but not enough that you are fighting it.
I disagree, but I will tell you that you will wear out any gripper quickly by working the spring that much too. As far as warming the muscles, working the joints and getting the blood flowing, it works for me. There's nothing wrong with building muscle either. It strengthens the joints.
 
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