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Discussion Starter #1
Hi guys

Now we have a problem as i don't have the side protection system to my front fender what can also keep front fender steady when riding very bumpy roads what we have here in Thailand,, here is pictures what problem and how it looks like so I KNOW you guys know how to fix it nicely and I'm waiting info from you as always

this has been fixed 2 times now but it will never survive here


This is how it do look and it's in BOTH side, L & R,,


I dont have that ,,,,what you call it what covers both side and direct wind to front brake pads,,

also any ideas where to order them? and what is usual price for them
as you can see i have already connection basement for them in my front fork

So all comments how to fix it and where to get replacement parts in desent way as i live so far i need to get it shipped to here...

Thank you again...
 

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If that were mine, I'd work on an expoxy or fiberglass repair, doing most of the build up inside the fender.

You could buy a new fender (mud guard), an primered (would need to be painted to match your bike) front fender for a 2004 is $211.05USD.

It seems tht in 2005 the front fender was changed to a different part number (different design), they cost $402.89USD and are available prepainted but probably not in the color of your bike, only 2005 and later colors. Also, I'm not sure if the front fenders are interchangable between the year groups. It is the later fender that has the "lowers" that provide some coverage of the brake rotor. Someone on this site will know if they are interchangable.


Here's where I look up parts: http://www.maxbmwmotorcycles.com/fiche/DiagramsMain.aspx?vid=51715&rnd=03192010

Pics of the two fender types attached:
 

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Discussion Starter #3
CharlieVT said:
If that were mine, I'd work on an expoxy or fiberglass repair, doing most of the build up inside the fender.

You could buy a new fender (mud guard), an primered (would need to be painted to match your bike) front fender for a 2004 is $211.05USD.

It seems tht in 2005 the front fender was changed to a different part number (different design), they cost $402.89USD and are available prepainted but probably not in the color of your bike, only 2005 and later colors. Also, I'm not sure if the front fenders are interchangable between the year groups. It is the later fender that has the "lowers" that provide some coverage of the brake rotor. Someone on this site will know if they are interchangable.


Here's where I look up parts: http://www.maxbmwmotorcycles.com/fiche/DiagramsMain.aspx?vid=51715&rnd=03192010

Pics of the two fender types attached:
Thanx Charlie

And i have to say that i have already used epoxy but not yet Fiberglass,, that is what i have in my mind for next BUT i was wondering how to fix outlook from front part and painting is no problem in here,,,cost only 20USD for BMW color,,,
but what is that thing what comes to connected to here?

WHERE IS that place for Bults in the fork,, it's on both side
 

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K1200LT-TH said:
Thanx Charlie

And i have to say that i have already used epoxy but not yet Fiberglass,, that is what i have in my mind for next BUT i was wondering how to fix outlook from front part and painting is no problem in here,,,cost only 20USD for BMW color,,,
but what is that thing what comes to connected to here?

WHERE IS that place for Bults in the fork,, it's on both side
Hi Marco,
That attachment point is not used on the early K1200lt models. My 2000 also has those attachment points, nothing as ever been there since the bike was new. Since BMW often uses the same part on different models, those points are probably used on other bikes, but not on our early model KLTs.

You might also find a used replacement fender at beemerboneyard.com. Of course, you'll have shipping costs and any import duties to deal with. http://www.beemerboneyard.com/k1200lt5.html

As far as epoxy and fiberglass repairs, when I am trying to get a good bond between materials, I will make a pattern of cuts with a utility knife into the base material to create undercuts and increase the surface area for the resin to bond to. See attached pic for the method I am talking about. As long as you have enough clearance between the underside of the fender and the tire, I think you can make the repair that is unseen.

Good luck.
 

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Enjoy The Ride
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Fiberglass won't stick to the fender. My 2004 fender is broke just like yours. The epoxy I used lasted 6 months. I'll be epoxying it again from the inside & outside this time and I'll leave the vinyl tape on the outside. The newer 2005 & up fenders with the extra bolt still crack like the 1999 to 2004 fenders do.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
hmmmmm,,, now i have to put my head o this and maybe i can make something very good and long lasting..

Thanx Dave good information regarding fiberglass, there is something what i wonder why it don't last long time,, as i been building fiberglass canoes and those can take even direct hit from the stone and when build very good it don't crack even,,,

ok, time to think more and IF any one else has ideas,,more than welcome to me and any other who has this problem.


Charlie

it came to my mind that MAYBE i will take a big and detain picture on that part what is directing wind to brake saddle and make it NEW and Bigger and connect it to fender and then to that small connection point in the fork,, :D

ANY IDEA WHERE I CAN FIND BIG and clear picture of it??
 

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Lost the front painted part somewhere on the hway last month. Only realised it when I got Home!
Managed to fit a 1100RT front one that my friend had lying around. Used some extra washers as spacers. The Rt fenders are of different material. The seem to flex better. Hope they don't break off too.
 

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saddleman said:
Fiberglass won't stick to the fender. My 2004 fender is broke just like yours. The epoxy I used lasted 6 months. I'll be epoxying it again from the inside & outside this time and I'll leave the vinyl tape on the outside. The newer 2005 & up fenders with the extra bolt still crack like the 1999 to 2004 fenders do.
The resin in fiberglass is typically epoxy resin also. The fiberglass is just filler for strength. Most readily available two-part resins are epoxies, and the different fillers give different handling and wear characteristics. Auto body filler (Bondo), JB Weld, fiberglass resin are all basically the polymerizing agents with modifications and fillers to provide their respective characteristics. And, yeah, the epoxy doesn't chemically bond to the plastic parts of our bikes. There are plastic "welding" methods which involve melting the existing material and adding addn't thermoplastic filler but I have limited experience using plastic "welding" and haven't been impressed with my results.

I have made lasting bonds using both epoxy resin with fiberglass filler and straight epoxy resin without filler. The key to a lasting bond is maximizing the surface area by roughening the surface of the base material. Sanding, scratching with a knife as shown in my pic above, and using a solvent like acetone to clean the base material first all will improve the bond. Covering as large an area as possible will improve bond strength and improve the chances for a lasting repair. Again however, there is no appreciable chemical bonding or weld between the resin and the base material and under stress the bond isn't as strong as the original material is. That's why maximizing the mechanical bond by creating small undercuts and roughening the surface of the base material is important.

An adhesives expert/chemical engineer versed in adhesives could tell us what kind of bonding agent would work best, but my understanding is that these injection molded thermoplastic materials like the LT tupperware is made of don't lend themselves to repair very well. So I generally use the resins that are easily obtained like 5-Minute Epoxy, JB Weld, and fiberglass resin, but recognise that the bond strength is very much dependent on micro-mechanical interlocking, the amount of surface area involved, not the strength of the repair material. Thickness of the repair material and fiberglass filler will increase the strength of the repair material, but won't increase the bond strength.

In short, surface preparation and maximizing the surface area of the base material covered are key to increasing the bond strength of expoxy repairs to the tupperware. I have several such repairs on my KLT, e.g. mirrors, under the front cowl where I have driving lights installed, and other points on the tupperware where the tupperware fasteners are located. I ride hard over bumpy roads and they hold up, so it can be done successfully.

HTH and Good luck.
 

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OK, here is the ghetto fix:

I noticed the cracks in mine about a year ago. I removed the fender cleaned the underside real good and "reinforced" it with several layers of Gorilla tape. The intend was to keep things in place until I order and install a new fender.

I forgot about it till I read this post. I just went into the garage, it still is a solid as the day I applied the tape...
 

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I agree totally with the bond being most important. If the resin doesn't stick, it doesn't matter how strong it is. Sanding helps, but next time I will use a utility knife to score it some.

I have been using epoxy and fiberglass drywall tape (I originally used gauze) to make repairs in plastic for years, ever since I balked at paying $60 for a replacement handle for my microwave door. Some epoxies are formulated for plastic (Loctite has one), though I don't know whether that means it's flexible or just bonds better, but I have had great results every time even with plain old 5-min epoxy.
 

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When I took my fender to the body shop at work they said fiberglass resin doesn't adhere very well to that type of plastic. They gave me a two part epoxy from loctite that stuck to the fender good but it cracked again about six months later. Maybe this time I should try the two part epoxy with the fiberglass mesh. I'll need to use something with a slower setup time so I can layer the fiberglass mesh. I roughed the fender with a 36 grit 2" grinder & I'll have to grind most of the epoxy off with the same grinder. The noise the fender makes when they are broke every time you hit a bump is annoying.
 

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Mine also broke like that . I made two small bracket out of aluminum

to go up on the inside of the fender , one on each side . I pop riveted them in place . They hold the thing together . Then I ruffed up the inside of the fender & fiberglassed it . You can see the pop rivets , but they match on both sides , & look OK .
 
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While traveling across I-94 in Wisconsin on the way to Rapid City CCR I heard something flapping and then caught something leaving the bike out of the corner of my eye. Sure enough it was the front fender...I never went back :wave
 

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I didn't read all the replies, so if I repeat forgive me.

I have used a bumper repair kit from Auto Zone. 10k and no problems.
 

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I have not had this failure but suggest that anyone trying a permanent aluminum fix to figure on at least a 2 inch overlap for the doubler on both inside and outside of the fracture, epoxy each doubler to the base fender material, & pop riveting the whole mess together while the epoxy sets. Cover the fix with bondo, finish sand and paint.

Getting the aluminum patch to reasonably match the contour of the fender (in and out) will require some body shop hammer work, or at least a planishing hammer etc. Of course if you do the planishing with a rivet gun, use driven aircraft rivets for a permanent solution. It will be a good exercise in compound forming of aluminum. Start with a soft aluminum alloy.

I suppose you could do a similar repair using fiberglass. The main thing is to use a long enough doubler/patch and put multiple layers on both the inside and the outside of the fender & clean up the fix with Bondo.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Thanx every one and what i actually doing now and planning is the that Side cover what is on newer bikes, i think 05 and newer,, what will come secured by bult to fork lift in the lower part in both side,, Sorry i don't know the name of that cover what is also direct air to brake saddle,,,,i try to find BIG picture of it so i could printed out and take to my fiberglass guy and made NEW for me but bigger side and what fits 2004 model and will be secured to fender as well,, so then it would never move anywhere any more.

So IF any one would have pictures of those parts in big format left and right side, can you send it to me so i can do re measurements so it would be re-made for 2004 model and painted as well :bmw:
 

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saddleman said:
When I took my fender to the body shop at work they said fiberglass resin doesn't adhere very well to that type of plastic. They gave me a two part epoxy from loctite that stuck to the fender good but it cracked again about six months later. Maybe this time I should try the two part epoxy with the fiberglass mesh. I'll need to use something with a slower setup time so I can layer the fiberglass mesh. I roughed the fender with a 36 grit 2" grinder & I'll have to grind most of the epoxy off with the same grinder. The noise the fender makes when they are broke every time you hit a bump is annoying.
I had the same problem Dave. On a tip from a friend, I used West System G/flex and layered fiberglass cloth. This stuff is great and works on canoes and kyacks.

BTW, I forgot to mention that I did the layering on the underside.
 

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I believe Frank has the right product. If the piece that fractured is ABS (it looks like it is from the photos) then the epoxies wont hold. The repair needs to be solvent welded per the link below. You can also get the solvent from your local hardware store/building materials center for a couple bucks a bottle.

I have had excellent success with ABS repairs by doubling up the material on the back side with scraps of ABS from a supplier like TAP plastics. No fiberglass mesh is needed as the solvent will make the patch piece and the original piece being repaired one piece. By bridging the fracture with the patch you are actually making the original piece stronger. A thicker patch piece will make a more vibration resistant repair as it will minimize flex/flap.

A heat gun, used judiciously, will allow you to make the bend required to follow the original shape.

This is a very easy, inexpensive, and permanent way to repair ABS.

Loren


















Loren

fpmlt said:
See if this might help. I've never used it, but it looks promising.

http://www.urethanesupply.com/plastifixintro.php

Someone here had a link (this may even be it) to a repair kit, but was holding off before trying it. Maybe he'll chime in. John, was that you?
 
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