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Just wanted to get some feedback on how others are riding their RT bikes. Typically I try not to rev past 5,000 RPM in lower gears, and find that at 4,000 - 4,500 RPM in 5th or 6th gear (above 80 mph) the engine loses its smooth and quiet feeling. Please offer some advice on how high you rev in each gear before shifting.
 

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You should be safe riding it up to the red line which, I believe, is 8,000 RPM for the 2009 RT. (For 2010 and up the limit went to 8,500.) Actually I think a built in rev limiter stops you from going higher than that.

For myself, I ride up to around 6,000 RPM on my 2010. The torque drops off after that that point. I don't know what the torque curve is for the 09 RT.
 

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I've the new DOHC engine and it happily thrums up to 8k. In fact from 5 to 8 it accelerates nicely without sounding strained,
I've had a GSA with the non DOHC and an R1200S. The GSA always felt thrashy past 5k but the R12S seemed to thrive on revs. So one would assume the injection and cam on the R12S was significantly different to allow for a sportier 'feel' and as the DOHC was bred from the HP2 set it also is happy revving out.

Stu
 

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jbwoodside said:
Just wanted to get some feedback on how others are riding their RT bikes. Typically I try not to rev past 5,000 RPM in lower gears, and find that at 4,000 - 4,500 RPM in 5th or 6th gear (above 80 mph) the engine loses its smooth and quiet feeling. Please offer some advice on how high you rev in each gear before shifting.
You should be able to rev it out to redline without any concern.
The graph attached however shows that on a twin cam 2010 RT there really is little value in reving above 6,000rpm.
This is where maximum torque is achieved and then drops off quickly and very little additional HP is produced beyond here also.
 

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dadicool59 said:
You should be able to rev it out to redline without any concern.
The graph attached however shows that on a twin cam 2010 RT there really is little value in reving above 6,000rpm.
This is where maximum torque is achieved and then drops off quickly and very little additional HP is produced beyond here also.
Except if you want to accelerate at a far rate of knots then upon changing gear you'd want to drop it back into the meat of the torque. So for example,and without checking gear ratios etc etc , you'd probably want to change at 7000ish so that you drop back to 5500. But like I said thats when 'making progress' officer.

Stu
 

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It also depends on what you want for fuel economy. My bike (07 RT) is a lot more responsive when taken up to higher RPMs. Shifting below 5000 is dull. Cruising at 4000 RPMs means a lot better ability to jump out of the way if required. Cornering is much better due to better control at the higher RPMs.

However... fuel economy suffers quite a bit like that. I can add 5 MPG by shifting around 4000 and cruising in 6th whenever possible. On surface streets, I keep the engine speed as close to 3000 as possible and keep speeds below 70 on the freeway. I can get into the mid 50's by doing all of this. I get bored to tears like this and it really is not as safe so I chose to sacrafice fuel economy and don't normally ride this way.
 

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I do find it a bit annoying that the bike ('09 R1200RT) vibrates so much over 4,000 RPM. I was told (and read on forums) that this was a break-in issue that would go away after 12-15,000 miles. Well, at 22,000 it still vibrates way too much over 4,000 RPM. It's my only disappointment with what is otherwise a wonderful bike.
 

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I do find it a bit annoying that the bike ('09 R1200RT) vibrates so much over 4,000 RPM. I was told (and read on forums) that this was a break-in issue that would go away after 12-15,000 miles. Well, at 22,000 it still vibrates way too much over 4,000 RPM. It's my only disappointment with what is otherwise a wonderful bike.
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And what does your dealer say about this??.. If the bike is not setup properly, It will vibrate quite a bit... Possibly you need the throttle bodies balanced by someone who "knows" what he's doing...

Warm the bike up..Put it on the center stand.. I have a big fan to put in front of the bike to keep the engine from overheating while I "fool" with it...

Loosen the clamp nut on the right side throttle cable adjuster at the throttle body.
Run the engine up to the problem RPM.. Adjust the cable adjuster one way or the other till the engine is smoothest.. Tighten the lock nut... See if it's still smooth.. Sometimes tightening the lock nut will change the setting slightly..Adjust till you get it right..

It is possible that there is something wrong with the engine that's causing it to vibrate excessively....
John
 

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My second 09 vibrated more than any of the other 9 R1200s that I have had. No one could figure it out or tame it. Even though it pulled strongly to redline' with the throttle opened to the stop, there was noticeable more vibration than the others. They do not like the higher revs without a lot of throttle.
The 2011 is very smooth.
 

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Interesting that your 09 had more vibration than any other 1200. I have an 05 and an 09. O5 is smooth through the entire range except for at idle, where it is fairly rough.

09 is smooth at idle, but lots of vibration at higher rpm.

Both redline just fine--one is smooth, and one has vibration. Weird...
 

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Interesting comments on my '09 vibrations. My dealer is, I believe, competent (Frank's in Essex Jct, VT) and I do remember him saying he adjusted the throttle bodies - but his final comment has always been something like, "runs just fine to me". Who knows?
 

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I found that mine smoothed out incredibly after a very careful valve adjustment and almost anal "zero tolerance" throttle body sync. Just because of fuel economy, I don't usually go above around 6K but have gone close to redline a few times without any issue. In traffic I try to keep it between 3500 and 4500 to get maximum power.

JayJay
 

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I have a 2009, I run it like I stole it. It is smooth even at high revs. I run it into the 7K range regularly, it likes it :D :D :D

This bike likes higher revs. I had some vibration in the beginning, but after I started giving it higher revs and running it harder and did some long canyon rides in the 5,500-7K rpm range it really smoothed out and helped break the engine in. My engine broke in at around 10,000 miles.

Lot's of opinions though...
 

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I used to run my GS at the same sort of rev range I've always run my Harley's. Around 4 - 5k and always felt lazy. Used a lot of brakes too slowing for corners (unless I was ultra lazy and slowed way off in the distance). Fuel mileage was never very good either - mainly because I was never in an efficient power band and always in too high a gear!

I did! That was until I took an advanced riding course with one of the Police instructors in my area. It took two days to figure out how he could get round corners significantly faster than me on a smaller bike and get better fuel mileage into the bargain.

Secret - and it 'just clicked' with me on one particular corner - was staying one gear lower in all circumstances than I normally would have done.

Long story short, I now ride in 2, 3 or 4th gear most of the time off motorway, at 5 - 7k. Almost no brakes required as I'm always in a responsive gear (can accelerate instantly or decelerate with engine braking instantly) and of course I read the road pretty well too now. Much faster in corners and fuel consumption is down around 15%. :dance:

My RT is now well and truly broken in and is as smooth as silk!

Try just one ride out where you ride at or just above the speed limit (appropriately) and in one gear lower than you would normally. Just see how much more controlled your cornering and bike control is. That should see you in the 5-7k rev range. Fuel figures would be good to check too!
 

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These 1200's like to be revved, my 07SE is now on 40,000 miles, I try to nudge the red line at least once a day on my commute to work, the bike runs as smooth as a smooth thing in smoothland, at the most I have to add 1/2 liter of oil between services, I get an around 280 miles from a tankful (comp est 53~55 MPG) and the bike laps it up.
As Dom mentions above good use of the revs leads to a well controlled ride, stable cornering with a corrctly balanced bike & accurate speed control for circumstance and instant pull should you need it to get out of some trouble.

Excersise the rev counter and gear lever, it's very good fun.
hth
\v/
 

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Dominatio said:
I used to run my GS at the same sort of rev range I've always run my Harley's. Around 4 - 5k and always felt lazy. Used a lot of brakes too slowing for corners (unless I was ultra lazy and slowed way off in the distance). Fuel mileage was never very good either - mainly because I was never in an efficient power band and always in too high a gear!

I did! That was until I took an advanced riding course with one of the Police instructors in my area. It took two days to figure out how he could get round corners significantly faster than me on a smaller bike and get better fuel mileage into the bargain.

Secret - and it 'just clicked' with me on one particular corner - was staying one gear lower in all circumstances than I normally would have done.

Long story short, I now ride in 2, 3 or 4th gear most of the time off motorway, at 5 - 7k. Almost no brakes required as I'm always in a responsive gear (can accelerate instantly or decelerate with engine braking instantly) and of course I read the road pretty well too now. Much faster in corners and fuel consumption is down around 15%. :dance:

My RT is now well and truly broken in and is as smooth as silk!

Try just one ride out where you ride at or just above the speed limit (appropriately) and in one gear lower than you would normally. Just see how much more controlled your cornering and bike control is. That should see you in the 5-7k rev range. Fuel figures would be good to check too!
I would agree with most of that. This is my first BMW and second bike. I put over 7,000 miles on my 2010 and still seemed very tight. Spoke with the mech. at the dealership and said it wouldn't hurt it to turn it up to redline. He recommended not to get out of 3rd in the city (45 speed limit). In 4th you can easily do over the posted speed limit (55-60) and still have alot of rpm range. It has taken a while to get used to the increased turning of the engine, but it's made for that...or at least, that's my understanding. :D
 

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jbwoodside said:
Just wanted to get some feedback on how others are riding their RT bikes. Typically I try not to rev past 5,000 RPM in lower gears, and find that at 4,000 - 4,500 RPM in 5th or 6th gear (above 80 mph) the engine loses its smooth and quiet feeling. Please offer some advice on how high you rev in each gear before shifting.

The BMW boxer engine is not a high performance engine compared to a modern 4cyl. It is happy to run between 3-5K
It will go to 8K but not really fun to keep it there. Besides, you will be going very fast and get in trouble very quickly.
Enjoy the RT's engine for what it is. Rev it to 5K and you will pass pretty much every other vehicule on the road anyway. The sweet spot of that engine around 4K corresponding to 120 km/h to 130 km/h (75-80mph) At such speeds its relaxed, stable and fast enough for North American roads.
 

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I tend to run in both the high and low rev camps depending on the situation. In town and on the highway, I normally keep the revs low at about 4k. In the twisties as has been mentioned, drop a gear and run in the 5k+ range for a lot more control. As Dom mentioned above, try running the pace in a high rev range in the twisties and you'll only rarely have to touch the brake.
 
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