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I just got my first used LT a few weeks ago and getting used to the weight in city driving is a challenge but I'm getting the hang of it. I managed to drop it at the gas station. Touchy front brake brought it to a quick stop while I was attempting a very slow turn around the gas pumps. I knew it would happen eventually.

I've not been on a bike in over a decade and I get a little nervous on the turns. I'm getting over that but I keep wondering... how far will this baby lean on the turn before she lays down?

I've seen comments on other threads that she'll go over pretty far but I'm too much of a chicken to push it too much. I guess practice is the course of action to take but some input from the community would help me out.

Lastly, I'm sure you've all seen the guy popping the wheelie on the LT. He power slides that bike into his right turn. If both brakes are engaged when either is used, how do you get the bias enough to do that??? I don't want to pop wheelies. I do want to learn how to turn confidently in tight areas.

Thanks.
 

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How tight were you able to turn in your EMC class? Oh... ;)

Stop waiting and take the class then you will find out for yourself and possibly learn info that could save your life. If it has been ten years since you have been on a bike you are going to be rusty at best. I had been riding for 35 years without a break, L.E.O. training and logging hundreds of thousands of miles, when I learned I had to take an EMC to be a Road Captain. I went thinking "What are THEY going to teach ME" but spent the entire day with my chin on the ground in shock at what I was learning to do with a bike.

Learn to crawl then walk and that will teach you all you need to run.
 

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IT is virtually impossible to get the LT to lean over far enough.
The thing would be better if it had another four inches of clearance without raising the ride height.

AttN Haters: I said four inches WITHOUT raising the ride height. Possibly if it were more narrow at the bottom.

 

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Discussion Starter #4
I should state that I do know about countersteering and use that method. I am taking classes this week and hope to have more insight and valuable practice off the street to help build my confidence.
 

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JimZ said:
.....
I've not been on a bike in over a decade and I get a little nervous on the turns. I'm getting over that but I keep wondering... how far will this baby lean on the turn before she lays down?

I've seen comments on other threads that she'll go over pretty far but I'm too much of a chicken to push it too much. I guess practice is the course of action to take but some input from the community would help me out.
.....
Howdy Jim,

The good news with the LT is that it has many ways to communicate to the Rider where you're at in a lean:
- If your shocks are good and the pre-load set properly you'll feel your footpegs start to vibrate and then rise up.
- Lean over a bit more and you'll hear the center stand (even with the rubber stops cut to half their length) and feel the vibration of the scraping through the seat.
- A bit further and you'll hear a loud buzzing type scraping noise that is the lower fairing on the asphalt.

After that, if you keep leaning, then you're in territory I haven't explored :eek:

.
 

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At a recent class on the track, I took the LT into new territory for me. I was very impressed at how solid and stable it is at extreme lean angles. I think the attached is the lap I ground the brake peddle a bit, but I learned in later laps that getting off the seat more allowed higher speed with less lean.

As others have said, take a class, have some fun!

-Scott
 

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This far (have audio on) when you've got a little speed up and have already taken out the centrestand edges.
..
A ride day at a track is great for even-ing out the peg wear on both sides.
..
and this is too far... courtesy of some sand on the road...
 

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cws said:
This far (have audio on) when you've got a little speed up and have already taken out the centrestand edges.
..
A ride day at a track is great for even-ing out the peg wear on both sides.
..
and this is too far... courtesy of some sand on the road...
Nice video. My brake lever is bent up like that and my shifter has some road rash on it. The fairing has holes. and my pegs are ground down. Thats as far as I'll lean on it. It would still go a bit further with the ME880 on the back. The Avon doesn't have quit the cornering angle as the 880. I quite leaning so far over because I'm afraid of tearing up the shifter. I wish I had some aftermarket shocks that raid it up 2 inches.
 

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JimZ said:
I just got my first used LT a few weeks ago and getting used to the weight in city driving is a challenge but I'm getting the hang of it. I managed to drop it at the gas station. Touchy front brake brought it to a quick stop while I was attempting a very slow turn around the gas pumps. I knew it would happen eventually.

I've not been on a bike in over a decade and I get a little nervous on the turns. I'm getting over that but I keep wondering... how far will this baby lean on the turn before she lays down?

I've seen comments on other threads that she'll go over pretty far but I'm too much of a chicken to push it too much. I guess practice is the course of action to take but some input from the community would help me out.

Lastly, I'm sure you've all seen the guy popping the wheelie on the LT. He power slides that bike into his right turn. If both brakes are engaged when either is used, how do you get the bias enough to do that??? I don't want to pop wheelies. I do want to learn how to turn confidently in tight areas.

Thanks.
One thing to learn when you're riding the big girl is to avoid using the front brake when traveling under 5 mph, especially in turns. It makes a world of difference in slow speed control.
 

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scurrie said:
At a recent class on the track, I took the LT into new territory for me. I was very impressed at how solid and stable it is at extreme lean angles. I think the attached is the lap I ground the brake peddle a bit, but I learned in later laps that getting off the seat more allowed higher speed with less lean.

As others have said, take a class, have some fun!

-Scott
Scurrie...I remember you attending the class at Pacific Raceway. I was working corner #3....you were doing a nice job handling those twisties on the big girl!
 

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Yup.

You will start scrapping plastic before you get into unsafe territory.

If you lower the pegs, you probably never hear the center stand or plastic scrape.

Bob
 

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My experience has been that I will first drag my one of the boots (toes) and then one of the pegs. I try not to go past the toe dragging as the peg drags have detrimental influence on the turn. It may just be my bad posture, but my toes do go first.
 

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pickerbiker said:
Scurrie...I remember you attending the class at Pacific Raceway. I was working corner #3....you were doing a nice job handling those twisties on the big girl!
And loving every minute of it! Thanks for watching over us, it was a great class! I'll be back next year.

-Scott
 

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JimZ said:
I just got my first used LT a few weeks ago and getting used to the weight in city driving is a challenge but I'm getting the hang of it. I managed to drop it at the gas station. Touchy front brake brought it to a quick stop while I was attempting a very slow turn around the gas pumps. I knew it would happen eventually.

I've not been on a bike in over a decade and I get a little nervous on the turns. I'm getting over that but I keep wondering... how far will this baby lean on the turn before she lays down?

I've seen comments on other threads that she'll go over pretty far but I'm too much of a chicken to push it too much. I guess practice is the course of action to take but some input from the community would help me out.

Lastly, I'm sure you've all seen the guy popping the wheelie on the LT. He power slides that bike into his right turn. If both brakes are engaged when either is used, how do you get the bias enough to do that??? I don't want to pop wheelies. I do want to learn how to turn confidently in tight areas.

Thanks.
You should ride within your limits AT ALL TIMES. You will achieve a comfort level with the bike over time, but allow that time to occur. I also highly recommend you ge to he MSF Experienced Rider Course to help get your skills brushed up.

As for lean, I had the pegs dragging the ground regularly on all of my LTs (99, 02, 05) at speed trough corners. On my 99 LT I was able to drag the lower portions of the bottom fairings a few times as well, and once dragged the tip-over wing on the top of a 6 inch curb going through a corner, taking the pointy end of it off. I backed of a little to a slightly more sane pace on my other 2 LTs, but these are some indications of what the bike is capable of.

As for the LT popping a wheelie and sliding the tires around, it was a specially prepared bike as far as the brakes go for his stunt show.
 

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JimZ said:
I managed to drop it at the gas station. Touchy front brake brought it to a quick stop while I was attempting a very slow turn around the gas pumps. I knew it would happen eventually.
The brakes are linked, but at low speed the peddle favors the rear brake. Stay off the hand brake around the pumps, parking lot, etc. Most folks will tell you to keep the front wheel straight when you come to a stop, but if you use the brake peddle, you can stop with the bars turned and not drop it. I do it all the time.

Leave it in first when you turn off the engine, put the side stand down and let roll against the gears, then lean it over onto the stand (in fact, I kill the engine by putting the side stand down in first). Keeps it from rolling off the stand.

Practice practice practice.....

-Scott
 

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Like the others said, you will scrape lots of stuff before you lean too far. I have left quite a bit of metal and maybe a little plastic on corners without the bike even coming close to feeling unstable. I don't even worry about leaning too far anymore.
 

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Wow! CWS, you are some kinda thrill seeker driving on the wrong side of the road like that!!......... :D
 

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DavidTaylor said:
You should ride within your limits AT ALL TIMES.
There is a problem with that for me. My comfort level is a LOT different then my wife's comfort level. When I scrape, she pops me on the back of the head. The second time I scrape, she gets scared and gets tense. That throws everything out as far as handling.
Might be a long way to Utah.;)
 

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BillyOmaha said:
Howdy Jim,

The good news with the LT is that it has many ways to communicate to the Rider where you're at in a lean:
- If your shocks are good and the pre-load set properly you'll feel your footpegs start to vibrate and then rise up.
- Lean over a bit more and you'll hear the center stand (even with the rubber stops cut to half their length) and feel the vibration of the scraping through the seat.
- A bit further and you'll hear a loud buzzing type scraping noise that is the lower fairing on the asphalt.

After that, if you keep leaning, then you're in territory I haven't explored :eek:

.
...then a bit further and you take the front tire all the way to the edge and get rid of the wobbly bits on the 020's.
 

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The bike will go over to the point to scraping driver pegs, center stand, brake or shifter lever, front plastic, passenger pegs and at the max will scrape the tip over plastic.

I once went into a turn to fast and took it to 10 tenths of it lean and it handled great. The biggest thing was to ride it out. I very rarely scrape today and hope to never do what I did the one time.

As for scrapping the passenger pegs, my wife didn't like it when I did that. I still have scares from that one.

Lean will not be an issue with this bike. Learning to drive it smartly can be. Have a good one.
 
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