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Discussion Starter #1
My buddy and his wife just bought a Voltage 5th wheel and offered to haul my K1200lt down to Florida for me and I went to look at the cargo area in the rear... It is wide enough for both bikes but how can I secure the bike? If just the front tire is in the holder where else can I hook tie downs to on the bike that support it when I only have floor d rings? Also the floor has 3 d rings down each side and none in the middle... Is there some kind of bracket that goes across the handlebars or something that goes across the frame under the seat as an accessory?.. I'm scratching my head on this one! I have hauled a lot of atvs and other bikes over the years in enclosed trailers and never had a bike that didn't really have obvious tie down points.
Thanks for the help guys!
Ken
 

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What ever you do don't use the handlebars. Big chance of bending them. Kirk Johnson has a video showing the best place to tie them down.
High up on the fork tubes just above the cross member the mudguard is mounted to. Make sure not to trap any brake lines beneath the tie downs.
At the back if you look up under the panier boxes you will see a metal tube sub frame. You can tie up to that without hurting anything.
 

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First, don't use the handle bars to tie down an LT. They will just bend.

The best place to tie down an LT is over the fork brace on the front end. The attached picture isn't one for hauling the bike but shows where to make the attachment. They sell or you can make small short straps to go around the fork with loops to hook the straps to and ratchet her down.

As for the back side, you may be able to lift the seat and get access to the frame to stabilize her side to side and keep her from bouncing.

Never had to haul mine but the handle bars are not the place to use straps on.

Others may have some better ideas on how to secure the back end.
 

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When I purchased mine, it was in February last year. Riding conditions in Illinois were not conducive for riding, so I trailered it. I used a front wheel chock, then tied down to the front fork brace. On the back, i used the subframe behind the panniers. I used ratchet straps. Over the course of the 600 mile trip (the trip was a bit convoluted), the bike never moved a bit. I checked the straps about every 150 miles. Rode better than my old Harley did!
 

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Lotsa discussion in the early years of LT handling in trailer/hauling situations. Click on the *technical* pull down, then the *miscellaneous* item, then *general* line and #8 has thread starters - click on the handle names to read threads.
 

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Would recommend that you use good ratcheting tie down straps too - the cam lock straps are easier to use but they will loosen.
 

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If you have strap set yu can lift seat, wrap straps on each side around frame rails and pull back down to ratchet assy. May have to wrap straps next to painted sides with rags.. push seat back down
 

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First, don't use the handle bars to tie down an LT. They will just bend.

The best place to tie down an LT is over the fork brace on the front end. The attached picture isn't one for hauling the bike but shows where to make the attachment. They sell or you can make small short straps to go around the fork with loops to hook the straps to and ratchet her down.

As for the back side, you may be able to lift the seat and get access to the frame to stabilize her side to side and keep her from bouncing.

Never had to haul mine but the handle bars are not the place to use straps on.

Others may have some better ideas on how to secure the back end.
I believe the official BMW recommendation is to use the side case frames under the side case on each side. That has worked for me on several ferry rides. I have never trailered my bike so I can't comment on that.

I start with bike on the side stand. I attach straps front and rear on the side stand side and pull up until they are barely slack. I then attach the straps on the side opposite the side stand and pull down until they are snug and have pulled the bike up off the side stand to a nearly vertical position. Depending on how much your suspension has sagged and what your preload is, you may have to loosen the straps on the side stand side in order to get the bike vertical without having undo load on the straps on the non-side stand side. Once the bike is vertical, raise the side stand so that it can't bounce against the floor as the suspension rides through any big bumps.

Reverse the process to unstrap. Lower the sidestand first and release tension on the straps opposite the side stand until the bike has tipped back firmly onto the side stand. Then remove all straps carefully so as to not damage the forks or paint.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thank you for the help Gentlemen! And thanks mtrevelino for sharing the bmw photo recommendation... This will definitely help! I believe what we will have to do is take a length of black pipe from side to side in the rear and attach it to tie downs in the floor. Then weld eyelets in the center of the pipe as to be between the bikes in the rear and give something to secure to from underside rear of bike frame as in those photos. The front will be locking chocks and securing to floor as mentioned. Thanks again everyone! This is a great resource having a bunch of genus guys on here! lol
Thanks, Ken

Ken Weisbarth
President
Twin Motors Inc.
Madison, Oh
 

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I have a toyhauler and have used Nick's Strongback for the last 10 years. I don't think it's available any more but it works great. Don't even need a front wheel chock.
 
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