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Discussion Starter #1
A friend has a Bluesea Fuseblock that we want to install on his LT.

My question is: Where is the best place to get power from to go TO the fuseblock? My thinking would be that you would want it to be "switched" power. Am I correct and where have any of you connected your fuseblocks?
 

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2005 K1200LT
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Jack,


The best way is through a 30Amp relay direct from the battery, with switched power controlling the relay. Several have mounted it either on top of the battery or up in the nose cone. Depends on where the loads are and how easy you want to be able to get to the fuses.
 

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Grifscoots installed a fuse block on LoneWolf's bike at the last tech day. He attached the fuse block to the bracket that holds the battery down. He ran power from the battery to a relay (that he added), and then he ran power back to the fuse block from the relay. Then he simply found a switched power source on the bike to energize the relay when the key was on. I don't think the fuse block he used was a Bluesea though, so you might want to check clearance before you mount to the top of the battery bracket. The Bluesea looks bigger than the fuse block that Griff was using.
 

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Dave Sealy recommends tying the fuse box and relay to the hot wire on the seat heater. This way when you turn the key off, all power to the fuse box is also cut off.

See this thread here: http://www.bmwlt.com/forums/showthread.php?t=11657

I bought the Bluesea Fuse box and the wiring. I just need to buy the relay and then attempt to do the install.

Please let me know how it goes!
 

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RVB1019 said:
Dave Sealy recommends tying the fuse box and relay to the hot wire on the seat heater. This way when you turn the key off, all power to the fuse box is also cut off.
Actually, he recommends tying only the relay coil to the seat heater circuit. You should tie the switched contacts of the relay to the battery and then to the relay fuse block.

The seat heater circuit would not be able to handle the load of all the fuses in the fuse block, particularly at the same time the seat heater is being used.
 

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Dean_BMW said:
Grifscoots installed a fuse block on LoneWolf's bike at the last tech day. He attached the fuse block to the bracket that holds the battery down. He ran power from the battery to a relay (that he added), and then he ran power back to the fuse block from the relay. Then he simply found a switched power source on the bike to energize the relay when the key was on. I don't think the fuse block he used was a Bluesea though, so you might want to check clearance before you mount to the top of the battery bracket. The Bluesea looks bigger than the fuse block that Griff was using.
This be true. I removed the metal hold down bracket on top of the battery, drilled corresponding holes to match the feets of the fuse block and attached. Installed back to the battery. I drew power from the bike side of the seat heater. That way when you remove the seat, you won't have dink with an extra wire.

It's imperative that you fuse the box as close to the box as you can. I like using these circuit breakers as they reset. Of course, if you follow good wiring practices, you'll never have a problem. I double sided taped this breaker next to the fuse box and covered the tips with some plastic caps to alleviate an accidental short.



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grassroots said:
It's imperative that you fuse the box as close to the box as you can.
I agree... but I think you meant to fuse as close to the battery as you can. I also prefer the circuit breaker idea, but another option would be to install a fusible link wire at your battery connection. A properly sized fusible link wire will burn up before it will allow enough current to pass through it to do major damage to your fuse block or battery. It is a one time device however, but it does allow for a clean neat install, particularly when space is tight. Most parts stores sell fusible link wire in pre-cut short lengths.
 

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Dean_BMW said:
I agree... but I think you meant to fuse as close to the battery as you can. I also prefer the circuit breaker idea, but another option would be to install a fusible link wire at your battery connection. A properly sized fusible link wire will burn up before it will allow enough current to pass through it to do major damage to your fuse block or battery. It is a one time device however, but it does allow for a clean neat install, particularly when space is tight. Most parts stores sell fusible link wire in pre-cut short lengths.
Yeah, that's what I meant, but what I think and what ends up in the world are two different thangs.

Fusing is what's in the mind of the beholder, chocolate of vanilla ice cream. If it's a momentary short, the fuse box is dead in the water with a fusible link, the circuit breaker resets.



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We're going to use everything that has been suggested, but does anyone have a part number for the relay...any specific one?
 

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They are standard SPST automotive types rated at 30 amps, available at all auto parts stores.
 

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sheldan2 said:
We're going to use everything that has been suggested, but does anyone have a part number for the relay...any specific one?
Another can of worms! There's your standard relay, your waterproof relay, you can buy the harness kit and relay and now, there's the new, solid state, no moving parts relay. Those puppies go for $18 apiece! Channing did a buy and I got a couple from him. Can't wait to try one, but I'll prolly have to ask him how to wire it again since I didn't write it down.



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grifscoots said:
Another can of worms! There's your standard relay, your waterproof relay, you can buy the harness kit and relay and now, there's the new, solid state, no moving parts relay. Those puppies go for $18 apiece! Channing did a buy and I got a couple from him. Can't wait to try one, but I'll prolly have to ask him how to wire it again since I didn't write it down.
Solid State Relays are good for many things, but if one is worried about getting full voltage to accessories, they are not a great choice. Solid State relays will always have a voltage drop across them, something in the order of 0.6-1.2 volts, depending on the type of solid state power controlling device is used in them. Some accessories do not cater well to much of a voltage drop on automotive systems. Lighting is really affected by voltage drop, with considerable light output sacrificed with relatively small voltage drops. I would stick to a water resistant or well protected standard hard contact relay.
 

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dshealey said:
Solid State Relays are good for many things, but if one is worried about getting full voltage to accessories, they are not a great choice. Solid State relays will always have a voltage drop across them, something in the order of 0.6-1.2 volts, depending on the type of solid state power controlling device is used in them. Some accessories do not cater well to much of a voltage drop on automotive systems. Lighting is really affected by voltage drop, with considerable light output sacrificed with relatively small voltage drops. I would stick to a water resistant or well protected standard hard contact relay.
So, what you're really trying to say is I got bent over?:D



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Harness the power!

dshealey said:
Solid State Relays are good for many things, but if one is worried about getting full voltage to accessories, they are not a great choice. Solid State relays will always have a voltage drop across them, something in the order of 0.6-1.2 volts, depending on the type of solid state power controlling device is used in them. Some accessories do not cater well to much of a voltage drop on automotive systems. Lighting is really affected by voltage drop, with considerable light output sacrificed with relatively small voltage drops. I would stick to a water resistant or well protected standard hard contact relay.
Guys, Let me weigh in as well.. If you are a bit hesitant to do all the connections and discover your errors, Obtain a Harness kit for the deal. I have used a pre-wired harness kit by Pilot #PL-HARN3 that I found at PepBoys but I suspect most auto parts stores have this or similar.. contains a complete fused harness capable of 2 connections, a REAL relay, and a neat little switch that you can even mount remote if you want the entire power system to be selectable on/off by you! It was only $19.99 TOTAL!! I have considerable experience in all form of electrical and electronic system design and implementation and I cant even buy the parts one by one for this price, and I don't have to build it!
 

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sheldan2 said:
We're going to use everything that has been suggested, but does anyone have a part number for the relay...any specific one?
You can use the standard 4 or 5 pin auto relay. What I do on bikes is take it apart, 2 tabs, add RTV to the mating surfaces and reattach the 2 halves. Use waterproof grease at the terminal connections. They last quite a while like this. Reason I like standard relays rather than sealed units, is when they do unexpectedly fail you on the road, often times you can open them up, clean the contacts and limp home.
 

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LT wiring

I used a Painless relay/fuse block and installed it on top of the right saddle-bag. I do have to remove the rear seat but it fits real nice there.

Autocom PRO-AVI is ontop of the other saddle bag.
 

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grifscoots said:
I love the Painless Fuse box, had one on the LT and now on the GT. The unswitched circuits come in real handy!
Hmmmm - I got that Centach one you gave me, plus I bought a Blue Sea off of Doug. Neither one of 'em are installed - reckon I oughta donate 'em to the auction table at Tan-Tar-A and shop around for a Painless?? That'll give Davey sumpthin' to do next time ole Toad is nekkid!! :rolleyes: ;)
 

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grifscoots said:
So, what you're really trying to say is I got bent over?:D
Not necessarily, depends on what you are trying to drive through the relay. If you hook one of them up, check the drop across it. Easy to do, just put an accurate meter across the two power leads on the relay to see what the drop is, or measure the voltage TO the relay, then the voltage OUT of it, and see what the difference is.

Solid State relays are really great for some uses, but especially AC ones. or higher voltage power DC uses. Sometimes too much voltage drop for lower voltage DC uses though.
 
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