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Discussion Starter #1
Gonna install a new aux fuse block in the 2007 K1200LT that I bought last summer. Before I begin, I'd kinda like to know what I already have. I've searched Google Images pretty hard but not come up with a match.

Anybody recognize this box? Looks like it had a cover at one time, but here are the guts --->

 

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I have seen about 6 different ones so far but I have never seen that one. Sorry. It does look to have a switched power relay and three fused circuits but that is about all I can determine.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
I have seen about 6 different ones so far but I have never seen that one. Sorry. It does look to have a switched power relay and three fused circuits but that is about all I can determine.
I would agree but look at all those empty spade connectors! I wonder what those are all about? Makes it looks like you could run 6 power connections through the three circuits, which would be totally weird.
 

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It would be easy enough to map it with a multimeter and just pull the fuses and check for ground continuity with the ohm function. Then introduce one fuse at a time and check each spade for voltage. It looks to be well made and water proof.
 
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Discussion Starter #6
Well, another day of Googling and I finally found it. And it turns out it's not necessarily "old" because it's still being sold! It's a proprietary fuse box made by Motolights.

If the bike actually had some Motolights, perhaps I would have found it sooner. :)

https://motolight.com/product/power-fuse-block/




Sent an e-mail to Motolights to see if they had any specs they could share with me.
 
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My RT came with the Moto lights, so I must have the same fuse block. I do not remember seeing the three fuses. I will have to take a look in the morning and take a picture of it.
 

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Well, another day of Googling and I finally found it. And it turns out it's not necessarily "old" because it's still being sold! It's a proprietary fuse box made by Motolights.

If the bike actually had some Motolights, perhaps I would have found it sooner. :)

https://motolight.com/product/power-fuse-block/




Sent an e-mail to Motolights to see if they had any specs they could share with me.
That is a pricey unit compared to the Fuzeblock unit. I am curious if you find a reason that justifies the higher price as the Fuzeblock unit seems equally capable with 6 circuits that can be any combination of switched and unstitched.
 
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Hey, it looks really well made. I would continue to use it once you make a map of functions. Way better than the standard 60$ fuse block with screw connections of years back that I use on my K bike.
 
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Well, another day of Googling and I finally found it. And it turns out it's not necessarily "old" because it's still being sold! It's a proprietary fuse box made by Motolights.

If the bike actually had some Motolights, perhaps I would have found it sooner. :)

https://motolight.com/product/power-fuse-block/




Sent an e-mail to Motolights to see if they had any specs they could share with me.
Lucky you! It certainly looks convenient! The Motolight website must have downloadable instructions if you have any questions. It appears straightforward enough, and well made!
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Lucky you! It certainly looks convenient! The Motolight website must have downloadable instructions if you have any questions. It appears straightforward enough, and well made!
Nope--no instructions. That's why I e-mailed them.

That is a pricey unit compared to the Fuzeblock unit. I am curious if you find a reason that justifies the higher price as the Fuzeblock unit seems equally capable with 6 circuits that can be any combination of switched and unstitched.
Didn't read Post #1?
 
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Here is what I have on my RT. It is a Touratech and has five hots and five grounds. I only see one fuse. It is powering the following:
Motolights
Auxiliary fans
JMB CB
GPS
Hyper Lights
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Here is what I have on my RT. It is a Touratech and has five hots and five grounds. I only see one fuse. It is powering the following:
Motolights
Auxiliary fans
JMB CB
GPS
Hyper Lights
Looked that one up. It has the one 15-amp fuse because that's the total capacity of the box for all five circuits combined. Which is apparently fine for what you got. If you were to power heated gear with it, that might put you over the top. Also, all five circuits are switched. I like having the flexibility to have some unswitched circuits for certain farkles but switched circuits are great especially to prevent parasitic drains.
 

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Here is what I have on my RT. It is a Touratech and has five hots and five grounds. I only see one fuse. It is powering the following:
Motolights
Auxiliary fans
JMB CB
GPS
Hyper Lights
That is a very poor design, but is safe as long as you use wire sized for the capacity of the fuse on EVERY accessory circuit. Remember that the purpose of a fuse is to protect the downstream wiring. If you have 5 circuits sharing a 15A fuse, then any circuit that shorts will potentially draw that much until the fuse blows. A better design fuses each circuit so that you can use smaller wire for smaller loads, say 3A for a GPS, and size the fuse for that circuit accordingly.

This approach is fine, it just requires you to use large gauge wire for every single circuit.
 

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My RT came with the Moto lights, so I must have the same fuse block.
Just for clarity, you don’t have to have this fuse block to run motolights.
They wire up and run independent of this fuse block.
 

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That is a very poor design, but is safe as long as you use wire sized for the capacity of the fuse on EVERY accessory circuit.

This approach is fine, it just requires you to use large gauge wire for every single circuit.
I agree but think the dealer installed the fuse block to act as a trigger for the higher circuit draws.
 

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Just for clarity, you don’t have to have this fuse block to run motolights.
They wire up and run independent of this fuse block.

Getting off subject here, but, I actually installed the motolights on my LT myself. On my RT, I think the dealer installed them for the previous owner. I wish I knew how they wired them up as I do not like the fact if I start the bike with the light switch on, they do not light. I have to turn the switch off then on again. The same if I stall the bike, when I restart it I have to cycle the light switch. Also, if I cycle the light switch too fast, they will not light.



They are connected through a dual auxiliary switch that came on some GS (?) motorcycles. On my LT, I had the motolight light switch which I never had to touch, I just left it in the on position. On the RT I have to remember to shut off the switch when I turn the key off and turn the switch back on after I start the bike. I had the bike for 10 years now, so I am use to the "drill".



I installed LED bulbs thinking they were drawing too much power, but I think it may be something with the CANBUS system. The entire fuse block stays powered for approximately 30 seconds after I shut off the bike.
 

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Getting off subject here, but, I actually installed the motolights on my LT myself. On my RT, I think the dealer installed them for the previous owner. I wish I knew how they wired them up as I do not like the fact if I start the bike with the light switch on, they do not light. I have to turn the switch off then on again. The same if I stall the bike, when I restart it I have to cycle the light switch. Also, if I cycle the light switch too fast, they will not light.



They are connected through a dual auxiliary switch that came on some GS (?) motorcycles. On my LT, I had the motolight light switch which I never had to touch, I just left it in the on position. On the RT I have to remember to shut off the switch when I turn the key off and turn the switch back on after I start the bike. I had the bike for 10 years now, so I am use to the "drill".



I installed LED bulbs thinking they were drawing too much power, but I think it may be something with the CANBUS system. The entire fuse block stays powered for approximately 30 seconds after I shut off the bike.
Sounds like they used a latching relay with a momentary activation style switch.

https://electronics.stackexchange.c...e-of-power-keep-on-until-no-button-is-pressed
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Going back to the fuse block that's the subject of this thread, I heard back from the good folks at Motolight, and they advised me that they never wrote an Installation Guide, but they gave me the info I needed over the phone.

So for the sake of anybody who might be wondering sometime in the future, and might stumble on this thread, the Motolight Power Fuse Block (#65229) has a capacity of 30 amps. There are three circuits, each has a max power rating of 10 amps. All three circuits are switched. The entire unit is controlled by a single relay.

There are three connections to the bike's wiring harness. Red goes to the +POS terminal on the battery, and this line should be protected with a 30-amp fuse somewhere between the battery and the fuse block. Black goes to ground, and can be grounded to the -NEG terminal on the battery or anywhere on the bike's frame where you can make a good strong connection. The third wire is yellow, it's the trigger wire, and it's located between the upper red wire and the lower black wire.

There are six spade terminals for connecting accessories to the power block--two terminals for each of the three circuits. These six terminals reside in the upper half of the block, above the fuses, or you could say they reside on the "red" half of the block. There are also six spade terminals on the lower half (the "black" half) -- these are all grounds.

In the picture below, the terminals are identified by the fuse they are connected to. To be clear, you can connect two accessories to each circuit as long as the total draw of the two lines doesn't exceed 10 amps, and you should choose a fuse for each circuit based on that total draw.

 

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Good job wringing this out for others that may run across one.
 
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