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Discussion Starter #1
I have a new 2010 RT with about 2,000 kilometres on it. At about the 1,200 km mark, I got stuck in holiday traffic on a long steep hill - had wifey on the back plus some luggage, and no way to split or get passed, so I was stuck in it.

It did not take long before I could smell the clutch, then started getting some smoke off it - then more smoke. Eventually got clear and things got back to normal. I have not had any trouble since, and everything feels pretty normal BUT ..... I am worried that I have caused permanent damage and may be looking at premature clutch failure.

I would appreciate your thoughts or opinions about this.

Thanks
 

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Sixty6north said:
I have a new 2010 RT with about 2,000 kilometres on it. At about the 1,200 km mark, I got stuck in holiday traffic on a long steep hill - had wifey on the back plus some luggage, and no way to split or get passed, so I was stuck in it.

It did not take long before I could smell the clutch, then started getting some smoke off it - then more smoke. Eventually got clear and things got back to normal. I have not had any trouble since, and everything feels pretty normal BUT ..... I am worried that I have caused permanent damage and may be looking at premature clutch failure.

I would appreciate your thoughts or opinions about this.

Thanks
Never hold the bike with the clutch. Use the brakes. If you got smoke, that's not good at all.
 

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You've not done any permanent damage, just a dry clutch getting very hot. Obviously not something you want to be doing with any kind or regularity.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Ponch said:
Never hold the bike with the clutch. Use the brakes. If you got smoke, that's not good at all.
I am not in the habit of holding the bike with the ckutch. The traffic was start- stop walking pace so I did not have many options.

I love this bike but the tall first gear and dry clutch make it a bit of a dog when commuting (which I do on it daily)
 

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I am not in the habit of holding the bike with the ckutch. The traffic was start- stop walking pace so I did not have many options. I love this bike but the tall first gear and dry clutch make it a bit of a dog when commuting (which I do on it daily)
And the 2010s have a shorter low gear than the earlier RTs! This is a fear of mine on my 2006. Long,uphill on-ramps in traffic jams, tourist towns with never ending jaywalkers such as Branson, MO, stop and go commuter traffic, the list goes on. And I would like to pull a Bushtec on our cross country tours which definitely exacerbates the issue. I'm keeping my fingers crossed.
 

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My biggest criticism of my 2010RT is the tall first gear. Yes, I know that it is not as tall as earlier models too but it is still tall! When I bought the RT I seriously considered getting one of the new 2009 RTPs that were available simply because of the enduro first gear! But, I didn't want to loose the passenger seat. It seems to me that since BMW puts such a tall first gear in the RTs that they should have gone with a wet clutch!

Just my $.02!
 

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The standard gearing is too tall. Install an RTP final drive, it will lower the gearing and not only help when moving off but give the bike more acceleration in every gear.

For 09 and earlier bikes a set of Lennies cam sprockets give the bike noticeably better low to mid rpm power and torque, less clutch slip is required, the bike pulls harder in every gear and may even outperform the twin cam RT.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
OwenM said:
The standard gearing is too tall. Install an RTP final drive, it will lower the gearing and not only help when moving off but give the bike more acceleration in every gear.

For 09 and earlier bikes a set of Lennies cam sprockets give the bike noticeably better low to mid rpm power and torque, less clutch slip is required, the bike pulls harder in every gear and may even outperform the twin cam RT.
This sounds like a good idea - is it practical? i.e. is it a simple un-bolt, bolt-on project and is it going to cost as much as the purchase price of the bike?
 

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Depends on whether you can get a used RTP FD at decent price. Otherwise not cheap as a look at parts pricing will show you.

Do not agree that the bike is geared too high as a whole. I like the operating highway range but a lot of my riding is 80 mph- don't want or need frenetic revs on the highway and like the gas mileage as is. I would much prefer a lower first and second gear but that means transmission design changes. My bike, an 08 RT, doesn't have Lennies sprockets (9 degree cam advance = generally this moves a torque peak down about 100 rpm per degree at the expense of power at the very top of the rev range that doesn't see much use anyway) but they should do a good job at livening up the mid range that sees the most use. Cam advance may make using decent gas more important but the R1200 comes with a sensor and ability to cope with minor fuel issues. The normal running rev range of the R1200 is lower than where the torque really starts to come in so dropping the torque curve to lower revs should benefit the typical user. Sprockets are a pretty straight forward install IF you know to do it without dropping bits into the motor or losing the cam chain in the sump. NOT recommended as a first ever foray into motor work, however- you should be at least moderately well versed in mucking with internals. Note that this is not a specific comment on the quality or actual performance of those parts etc because I don't use them (yet- have been thinking about it for this summer BUT I've also got access to a K1200RS I can "borrow" that will eat my RT no matter how much I fiddle with it. Sometimes its wise to have restraint though I rarely manage it).
 

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Replacing the final drive as a unit is a simple job that anyone with moderate mechanical aptitude can do in less than 2 hours. A used FD can be had for $400 or less so its not expensive and installation by a BMW mechanic (if you don't feel confident) should take less than an hour so that wont cost much either. Everything can be returned to standard just as easily.

The RTP final drive ratio is 2.75:1, only 5% lower than the 2.62:1 on a standard Hex head RT. This makes little difference to cruising speed RPM but gives the bike 5% more acceleration under all conditions from idle to red line in any gear. Combine this with the extra low to mid range torque that Lennies cam sprockets provide and the you get a very noticeable improvement in pulling power and performance. Less gear changing is required and the bike pulls a passenger and luggage noticeably better, the way a 1200cc twin should have in the first place.

IMHO these are the best performance modifications you can do to an RT as they give improvement exactly where it is needed and allow an 05-09 RT to outperform a 10-11 twin cam model.
 

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Forgive my ignorance, but I am not familiar with Lennies cam sprockets. Will this and the FD change significantly change my gas mileage?

Mick
 
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