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Discussion Starter #1
I have a friend whom I really want to go riding and his 99 Road King classic but he has a fuel leak at the tank bolts. I have watched several videos and a mention is made of a check valve inside when you unbolt the line. It is the standard line mount, not a QD type and he spent unreasonable money at a dealer to have the lines replaced but left it there long after and I believe any warranty has expired.

Before I go over and help him and make a fool of myself by pulling the line off and have it dump gas all over his bike and garage, I would like to know if there is indeed a check valve in the tank so I can pull the lines and inspect the O-rings without a flood.

Only picture I have for reference is attached.

Thanks in advance. I know there are many current and EX HD riders on this forum with the knowledge I seek.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
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30 views and no Harley peeps? Help me be the hero for this poor soul ;)
 

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30 views and no Harley peeps? Help me be the hero for this poor soul ;)
Might have better luck at a Harley forum. They must have some, right?
 

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Might have better luck at a Harley forum. They must have some, right?
I might but I know there are BMW riders here as well that also have an HD or two or did at one time so it is worth a shot. Not in depth technical information, just someone who has had one and pulled the tank. It either made a mess or it didn't
>:)
 

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I might but I know there are BMW riders here as well that also have an HD or two or did at one time so it is worth a shot. Not in depth technical information, just someone who has had one and pulled the tank. It either made a mess or it didn't
>:)
Looks like a banjo bolt fitting ... I say mess!
 
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Looks like a banjo bolt fitting ... I say mess!
I would be prepared for a mess. On the latest Harleys I fooled with there was a vacuum to the petcock that sort of acted as a checkball so you could remove the engine lines but what you are showing seems to be the crossover lines. I would expect those to freeflow. The bikes I have worked on were older than this bike (1930's-2003) so there could be magic there I am not familiar with.
Steve
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I would be prepared for a mess. On the latest Harleys I fooled with there was a vacuum to the petcock that sort of acted as a checkball so you could remove the engine lines but what you are showing seems to be the crossover lines. I would expect those to freeflow. The bikes I have worked on were older than this bike (1930's-2003) so there could be magic there I am not familiar with.
Steve
Well, I finally broke down and went to a HD forum to snoop around and I survived ;)

Seems it will indeed make a mess and the O-ring that is leaking is not replaceable so new lines may be in order even though they were just replaced. This may be a go plead with that dealer as it was an $800 job. They shouldn't leak but the one forum i did go to had several of threads on that issue.
 

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There should be a cross over tube at the front of the tank that you can pull and drain the tank from.
I'm surprised that the O-ring can't be replaced. Looking at the parts diagram it should be replaceable but they may have done away with the stock parts and used a aftermarket part. I know some will mold the seal ring into the banjo bolt but surly it could be cleaned out and replaced with a decent O-ring. My 2001 Road King never had a leak so I didn't pull that side off to see how it worked. Check out Ronnies OEM Parts Finder for part diagrams and part numbers.
 

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There should be a cross over tube at the front of the tank that you can pull and drain the tank from.
I'm surprised that the O-ring can't be replaced. Looking at the parts diagram it should be replaceable but they may have done away with the stock parts and used a aftermarket part. I know some will mold the seal ring into the banjo bolt but surly it could be cleaned out and replaced with a decent O-ring. My 2001 Road King never had a leak so I didn't pull that side off to see how it worked. Check out Ronnies OEM Parts Finder for part diagrams and part numbers.
From what I understand, this is a one year setup for fuel Injection made by M&M. Ronnies doesn't even list a 99 RK EFI model. There are two O-rings, one inside between the nut and the center shaft, and one that goes on the cone that fits into the tank. The word from the forum I visited is, once the two pieces are snapped together, they don't come apart so you can only replace the cone O-ring and if it leaks between the nut and the swivel, your only recourse is to replace the entire line.
 

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From what I understand, this is a one year setup for fuel Injection made by M&M. Ronnies doesn't even list a 99 RK EFI model. There are two O-rings, one inside between the nut and the center shaft, and one that goes on the cone that fits into the tank. The word from the forum I visited is, once the two pieces are snapped together, they don't come apart so you can only replace the cone O-ring and if it leaks between the nut and the swivel, your only recourse is to replace the entire line.
You should be able to look at the 2000-2001 Road kings as well. They ran the M&M EFI until 2002 when they switched to the Delphi system. Looking at the parts diagram I see what they are saying. Chances are the tech didn't lube the parts prior to instillation causing the O-ring to roll or get nicked. I never understood that design myself but I don't make the big bucks like them..
 

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You should be able to look at the 2000-2001 Road kings as well. They ran the M&M EFI until 2002 when they switched to the Delphi system. Looking at the parts diagram I see what they are saying. Chances are the tech didn't lube the parts prior to instillation causing the O-ring to roll or get nicked. I never understood that design myself but I don't make the big bucks like them..
Well, if the HD stealer doesn't do anything about this and I have little expectation that they will, Goodrich seems to make a aftermarket replacement set for those lines at a fraction of the stealer cost. I can always have him go that route and hope for the best. Would be a shame seeing he just paid for this to be fixed last year. I probably have the O-ring for the nipple and can replace that and see if the issue goes away but the forums indicate that didn't fix their issue when it was leaking at the bottom of the nut and they had to replace the lines anyway.

Poor design IMO, same as you. If there is an O-ring in the mix, it needs to be replaceable. When he mentioned to me last year when the bike was at the dealer and that the lines had to be replaced for $800, and that it was probably an O-ring, my jaw hit the floor. $800 for a leaking O-ring!!!!!! I would be fabricating something different if that was mine and wrap it with aluminum tape to make it shiny ;)
 

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Well, if the HD stealer doesn't do anything about this and I have little expectation that they will, Goodrich seems to make a aftermarket replacement set for those lines at a fraction of the stealer cost. I can always have him go that route and hope for the best. Would be a shame seeing he just paid for this to be fixed last year. I probably have the O-ring for the nipple and can replace that and see if the issue goes away but the forums indicate that didn't fix their issue when it was leaking at the bottom of the nut and they had to replace the lines anyway.

Poor design IMO, same as you. If there is an O-ring in the mix, it needs to be replaceable. When he mentioned to me last year when the bike was at the dealer and that the lines had to be replaced for $800, and that it was probably an O-ring, my jaw hit the floor. $800 for a leaking O-ring!!!!!! I would be fabricating something different if that was mine and wrap it with aluminum tape to make it shiny ;)
IMO aftermarket is the way to go. If you do use OEM I order online from dealers or other vendors for significantly lower prices.

Since they replaced the lines there is ~$300, figure labor at $80 per hour that means it took them around 6 hours to do the job. That's not unheard of if they had to pull the fuel pump from inside of the tank. I doubt it took that long considering they don't have to remove the tank and most likely didn't have to remove the pump. That's one of the reasons I wrench my own, I have more time than money.
 

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IMO aftermarket is the way to go. If you do use OEM I order online from dealers or other vendors for significantly lower prices.

Since they replaced the lines there is ~$300, figure labor at $80 per hour that means it took them around 6 hours to do the job. That's not unheard of if they had to pull the fuel pump from inside of the tank. I doubt it took that long considering they don't have to remove the tank and most likely didn't have to remove the pump. That's one of the reasons I wrench my own, I have more time than money.
I too have more time than money but I have far less trust of shop mechanics than I do of myself. Yes, there may be a learning curve in doing it myself like this silly HD fuel fitting but I fix it like i am going to ride it and not send it out the door for someone else to ride and discover it wasn't done right. I am not in the business of making money doing my repairs so if it sits for a month while I take it apart and put it back together, who cares other than no saddle time.
 

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I too have more time than money but I have far less trust of shop mechanics than I do of myself. Yes, there may be a learning curve in doing it myself like this silly HD fuel fitting but I fix it like i am going to ride it and not send it out the door for someone else to ride and discover it wasn't done right. I am not in the business of making money doing my repairs so if it sits for a month while I take it apart and put it back together, who cares other than no saddle time.
I'm in the same boat. I had sent my Harley to a couple mechanics and I usually had to redo whatever they did plus fix something else they messed up. The added bonus for me is knowing exactly what was done so if something goes wrong after the fact I have a better idea of where to start. Plus I knew how to fix it if I (or someone else) has the problem in the future.
 

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I'm in the same boat. I had sent my Harley to a couple mechanics and I usually had to redo whatever they did plus fix something else they messed up. The added bonus for me is knowing exactly what was done so if something goes wrong after the fact I have a better idea of where to start. Plus I knew how to fix it if I (or someone else) has the problem in the future.
Exactly! I am more trusting of information from someone I don't know than having someone else I don't know do something for me that I do not know about. In doing it myself, I will very quickly determine if the information was correct or not and then I know how help others fix it if needed. That is why I like reading about others efforts here with pictures and instructions of what they did. Sometimes it costs me almost as much as taking it in to buy or make the tools necessary but then I have something besides just a shiny new part and an empty wallet when done.
 

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Exactly! I am more trusting of information from someone I don't know than having someone else I don't know do something for me that I do not know about. In doing it myself, I will very quickly determine if the information was correct or not and then I know how help others fix it if needed. That is why I like reading about others efforts here with pictures and instructions of what they did. Sometimes it costs me almost as much as taking it in to buy or make the tools necessary but then I have something besides just a shiny new part and an empty wallet when done.
I think I spent more time reading about changing brake lines, installing HID and mounting auxiliary lights then it took for me to actually do those things. Making brackets, building a latching relay circuit for the HID and lights (and realizing I overlooked a major part) then deciding on a simple work around has been half the fun of this bike. Now I can give some advice from my experience to hopefully reduce their time/labor and costs.
 

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That is definitely a crossover line.. Best thing to do is drain the fuel (can do it by just disconnecting one of those fittings) then you won't have to worry about it. 35 years on a harley from Shoveled to twin cam 103", so i've done my share of wrenching.. Would never go back to Harley now though.
 
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