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:bike::yeah:
 
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:toast:

I've only had mine for about a week, but I'm already in love with her. :kiss:

When she got here, she had no rear brakes. We got that fixed by simply bleeding the brakes yesterday. I love her even more now that she stops even better.
 

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Wiped the bugs off her face with a smile, just turned 116,000, ...this girl just runs...
...
Life is good
Nice report. :thumb:

Here's another:
Bike is a 2000 with 96,000 miles; one owner :). Engine runs like new. Tires, brakes, handling, all just right.

Foliage is close to peak around here; we head out for a few hours Sunday afternoon, southeast Vermont and northwest Mass.
I've got 60's rock in the ear speakers; the likes of Savoy Brown, Jethro Tull, Ten Years After...

The world's greatest pillion rider is relaxed between her arm rests and floor boards, listening to an audio book on her Kindle; I check her posture in the mirrors occasionally, she's always relaxed. I tap her knee to alert her to a bump in the road or to point out a scene, a fly fisherman in waders, a small group of Holsteins grazing a hillside pasture.

I'm cranking along back roads, following streams that wind between the hills of Vermont. These roads are mostly paved but narrow enough there is no painted center line. We know roads that have only a little local traffic, no out of state leaf peepers. The occasional local driver we come up on usually slows, puts on a right turn signal and waves us past. Spirited riding, the driveline is kept loaded, trail braking into corners, throttle keeps the driveline pulling against the feathered brakes. At the apex, off the brakes and roll on throttle, maybe an upshift, and then the next curve. The tachometer needle is pointing straight ahead a lot of the time. The bike loves this. I love this. Pillion rider has her elbows on the arm rests, hands dangling, relaxed in the wind.

Trees of yellow and green leaves over-hanging the road give a tunnel effect to the ride. Tunnels of color.
Then climbing out of the valley, over rolling farm land, vistas of yellow, orange, and crimson.
(Some years the foliage is mostly yellow and rust colored orange, but this year a good show of crimson and other shades of red.)

We pass multi-million dollar estates on hill tops built by out-of-staters who wanted a Vermont retreat, "starter castles" of the ostentatious; big modern horse barns, horse pastures with white board fencing. Just down the road a couple of local boys, "Swamp Yankees" drinking beer and smoking, leaning on the hood of their pickups, snowmobiles and fourwheelers scattered around the yard; I wonder to myself what they think of their hill-top neighbors...

We pass abandoned old farmsteads, falling down barns, and old sugar houses that haven't made syrup in years. I love these old places; vestiges of the subsistence life of yesteryear.

The KLT takes us through all this, sublime scenery, amazing views, and a sense of nostalgia. And the ride, what a great ride.

Yeah, life is good.
 

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Nice report. :thumb:

Here's another:
Bike is a 2000 with 96,000 miles; one owner :). Engine runs like new. Tires, brakes, handling, all just right.

Foliage is close to peak around here; we head out for a few hours Sunday afternoon, southeast Vermont and northwest Mass.
I've got 60's rock in the ear speakers; the likes of Savoy Brown, Jethro Tull, Ten Years After...

The world's greatest pillion rider is relaxed between her arm rests and floor boards, listening to an audio book on her Kindle; I check her posture in the mirrors occasionally, she's always relaxed. I tap her knee to alert her to a bump in the road or to point out a scene, a fly fisherman in waders, a small group of Holsteins grazing a hillside pasture.

I'm cranking along back roads, following streams that wind between the hills of Vermont. These roads are mostly paved but narrow enough there is no painted center line. We know roads that have only a little local traffic, no out of state leaf peepers. The occasional local driver we come up on usually slows, puts on a right turn signal and waves us past. Spirited riding, the driveline is kept loaded, trail braking into corners, throttle keeps the driveline pulling against the feathered brakes. At the apex, off the brakes and roll on throttle, maybe an upshift, and then the next curve. The tachometer needle is pointing straight ahead a lot of the time. The bike loves this. I love this. Pillion rider has her elbows on the arm rests, hands dangling, relaxed in the wind.

Trees of yellow and green leaves over-hanging the road give a tunnel effect to the ride. Tunnels of color.
Then climbing out of the valley, over rolling farm land, vistas of yellow, orange, and crimson.
(Some years the foliage is mostly yellow and rust colored orange, but this year a good show of crimson and other shades of red.)

We pass multi-million dollar estates on hill tops built by out-of-staters who wanted a Vermont retreat, "starter castles" of the ostentatious; big modern horse barns, horse pastures with white board fencing. Just down the road a couple of local boys, "Swamp Yankees" drinking beer and smoking, leaning on the hood of their pickups, snowmobiles and fourwheelers scattered around the yard; I wonder to myself what they think of their hill-top neighbors...

We pass abandoned old farmsteads, falling down barns, and old sugar houses that haven't made syrup in years. I love these old places; vestiges of the subsistence life of yesteryear.

The KLT takes us through all this, sublime scenery, amazing views, and a sense of nostalgia. And the ride, what a great ride.

Yeah, life is good.

Charlie, my God that story was fantastic, you need to start writing travel logs for Road Runner Magazine. I really enjoyed that, The Bennington area is one of my favorites in Vermont, Thanks[
 

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Nice report. :thumb:

Here's another:
Bike is a 2000 with 96,000 miles; one owner :). Engine runs like new. Tires, brakes, handling, all just right.

Foliage is close to peak around here; we head out for a few hours Sunday afternoon, southeast Vermont and northwest Mass.
I've got 60's rock in the ear speakers; the likes of Savoy Brown, Jethro Tull, Ten Years After...

The world's greatest pillion rider is relaxed between her arm rests and floor boards, listening to an audio book on her Kindle; I check her posture in the mirrors occasionally, she's always relaxed. I tap her knee to alert her to a bump in the road or to point out a scene, a fly fisherman in waders, a small group of Holsteins grazing a hillside pasture.

I'm cranking along back roads, following streams that wind between the hills of Vermont. These roads are mostly paved but narrow enough there is no painted center line. We know roads that have only a little local traffic, no out of state leaf peepers. The occasional local driver we come up on usually slows, puts on a right turn signal and waves us past. Spirited riding, the driveline is kept loaded, trail braking into corners, throttle keeps the driveline pulling against the feathered brakes. At the apex, off the brakes and roll on throttle, maybe an upshift, and then the next curve. The tachometer needle is pointing straight ahead a lot of the time. The bike loves this. I love this. Pillion rider has her elbows on the arm rests, hands dangling, relaxed in the wind.

Trees of yellow and green leaves over-hanging the road give a tunnel effect to the ride. Tunnels of color.
Then climbing out of the valley, over rolling farm land, vistas of yellow, orange, and crimson.
(Some years the foliage is mostly yellow and rust colored orange, but this year a good show of crimson and other shades of red.)

We pass multi-million dollar estates on hill tops built by out-of-staters who wanted a Vermont retreat, "starter castles" of the ostentatious; big modern horse barns, horse pastures with white board fencing. Just down the road a couple of local boys, "Swamp Yankees" drinking beer and smoking, leaning on the hood of their pickups, snowmobiles and fourwheelers scattered around the yard; I wonder to myself what they think of their hill-top neighbors...

We pass abandoned old farmsteads, falling down barns, and old sugar houses that haven't made syrup in years. I love these old places; vestiges of the subsistence life of yesteryear.

The KLT takes us through all this, sublime scenery, amazing views, and a sense of nostalgia. And the ride, what a great ride.

Yeah, life is good.

Poetry. Pure poetry. If you're not already one, you have a solid future as a writer. :bowdown:


Mark
 

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Wiped the bugs off her face with a smile, just turned 116,000, even after the final drive failures this girl just runs (no issues the last 24k since she was shimmed right).

Outside of a stupid tyre issue I created, she is more fun than ever

Life is good
Yes. Yes, she is.

My wife and I rode our '07 with a measly 54,000 miles from northcentral PA to Titusville last weekend with two friends from CT we met on our Alps tour. He rides a GSA and she a 1200R, as I recall.

It rained almost all day Saturday as we rode west. Temps ranged from 39 to 44. Our rain suits had all soaked through by lunch. Not a surprise for our cheap Frog Toggs, but more of a surprise for their fancy BMW suits. They fortunately had electric gear or hypothermia would have been a real issue. We got by fine with heated seats and grips, though my feet were pretty cold after my boots soaked through. I don't have water proof boots and gloves as with the LT I seldom need them. Then again, I have never ridden 6 hours in fairly heavy rain. Still had a great time. I actually like riding in the rain... And the protection of the LT is second to none. That is the main reason I haven't traded for a GTL. Days like this remind me of that. The only downer is my clutch slips above about 3/4 throttle so I can't pass vehicles like I used to. Hope to fix that this winter.

Stayed at a neat little place called the Caboose Motel in Titusville and got warmed up eventually.

The ride home Sunday was dry and warmer, in the 50s, and with some sun. Leaves were still ahead of peak, but the mountains of western PA were majestic. We rode past Kinzua dam and reservoir and flew along route 666. My LT never left the road, but my light friend (a short woman of Japanese descent) was "catching air" on her bike. Even riding two-up with a weak clutch, I can still move the LT along at a pace that at least makes it interesting for solo riders on sportier bikes. Probably wouldn't do that as well on a Wing.

We stopped at Kinzua Bridge State Park and walked past the under construction visitor center which will be really nice next year. Walked out onto what's left of the bridge and enjoyed the fall view. Doesn't get any better than that. Stopped at Colton Point overlooking the PA Grand Canyon on the way home and enjoyed that expansive vista. The only downer was that my friend on the 1000R tangled with a car just 4 miles from my house and broke her fibula. Fortunately, it was a relatively low speed crash with no other injuries. The Buick will need a new front fender, the BMW needs some dirt cleaned out of it and the rider will spend 6 weeks on crutches. She left the next day in good spirits (thankfully they has trucked their bikes to my house) and I think she will ride again. I can see her being a little spooked as she totaled her last bike hitting the side of an SUV just a year ago.

Yep, the LT has its faults such as the %{+%]# final drive and dry(weak) clutch, but when it is working well at all, it is a capable and entertaining bike whose equal I have yet to find.
 

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Y2K Just ready to roll over 89k. Had it for 9 yrs had 20k when I bought it. Same final drive. No real issues. Still the bike for me and my wife. Had nice Sunday ride in the hills of Southern Indiana and along Ohio River colors are just turning. Every time I make a ride like this I want to do more. Leaving Friday with my youngest son for the Smokies and will do all of the blue ridge parkway we can do on Saturday and them home on Sunday. My son just sold his crotch rocket and got his 1st BMW 02 1150gs and he's thrilled with it. Can't wait to hang some curves with the big girl as I just put on 2 new tires.
 

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Love reading all the KLT positivity.

I bought a 2000 about 9 years ago for my dad to ride with me. He rode it for 4 years then it sat for the last 5. I put a new battery in it, gave it an oil change and put it back on the road. She is running great so far, now I am waiting for the new brake lines to come in and i will do the rest of the fluids so its all ready to tour next year.

She has 41k miles, wilbers shocks, Russel seat and a Vtechnik
windscreen. I am sure a few other little goodies I am not paying attention to. After my 42* commute the other day i did notice its missing the heated grips button :crying:
 

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It rained almost all day Saturday as we rode west. Temps ranged from 39 to 44. Our rain suits had all soaked through by lunch. Not a surprise for our cheap Frog Toggs, but more of a surprise for their fancy BMW suits.
I went through somewhat similar weather after leaving Coeur d'Alene last month on my day trip through British Columbia, Alberta and dropping back down into the US to Glacier Park - it rained the entire day, and converted to snow as the temp dropped to 32 as I climbed a border pass back into the States. I wore blue jeans and a sweatshirt under my Aerostich Roadcrafter R3 suit.

After crossing into BC, I stopped briefly at a cafe for lunch. There were 3 Canadian Harley riders inside eating and warming up. As I finished my soup, they started pulling on all of their layers of clothing and rain gear. It took me about a minute to put mine on, and was back in the rain and on the road before they even got out the door.

My suit kept me warm and dry, and the gloves were the only things that got wet, but the LTs heated grips kept my hands warm - love my 'Stich! :wave
 

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Curtis, I showed your ride report to several people and they all were greatly impressed with your writing ability. If you wish I am certain that a magazine will pick you up as a columnist. Keep up the reports, it's as if we are there with you. We were in Brandon Vermont last year at this time for my son's wedding. I could "see" what you were writing and while there the wife and I were both wishing for our bikes.

Robert
 

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Nice writing Charlie. I like the word pictures. Reminds me of the riding up here in north Idaho. Pretty similar scenario, except my pillion is usually as nervous as an old hen. With my aggressive riding style, that's not likely to change.
Might have to spring for the armrest farkle. Maybe she'd like the extra "restraints" and maybe the pillion pucker syndrome would ease.

Who am I kidding? If she relaxed, I'd just ride faster. :wow:

Bob
 

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I have a 2003 LT that when I bought it in 2005 had 24K on it. As of last week, it has 100,006 miles on it with the same Final Drive, one replacement clutch, and a slave unit. Other than the normal wear and tear items like tires, batteries, fuel lines, this bike has been a dream to operate and almost virtually problem-free. It has never broke down and has always come through whether it be a Iron Butt Ride, a 2829 mile ride from Missouri to South Padre Island in Texas, or a 5-state ride to ride the Blue Ridge Parkway.
Yes, I'm a very happy rider on this. Even more so with an upgraded comm system from SENA, XM, Ham and CB radios. Makes the ride pleasant.
Granted, it does require plenty of TLC and preventative maintenance, but the end result is a fine operating machine.
 

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"]Spirited riding, the driveline is kept loaded, trail braking into corners, throttle keeps the driveline pulling against the feathered brakes. At the apex, off the brakes and roll on throttle, maybe an upshift, and then the next curve. The tachometer needle is pointing straight ahead a lot of the time."

What is your RPM during this? I'm trying to master cornering on this bike and do ride the rear brake and I do keep the throttle open, but still feel I'm going to fall over
 

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"]Spirited riding, the driveline is kept loaded, trail braking into corners, throttle keeps the driveline pulling against the feathered brakes. At the apex, off the brakes and roll on throttle, maybe an upshift, and then the next curve. The tachometer needle is pointing straight ahead a lot of the time."

What is your RPM during this? I'm trying to master cornering on this bike and do ride the rear brake and I do keep the throttle open, but still feel I'm going to fall over
RPM's are generally 3-6K I suppose. I'm not watching the tach all that much.
If passing, or climbing a mountain pass I might be 6K+ to just shy of the rev limiter.

If you feel like you're "going to fall over", I wonder, do you feel like you are going to fall into the turn or out of the turn?
That is, do you feel like you are going to low side, or high side?

How long have you been riding the K1200LT or BMWs? Is neutral steering new to you? I have found that some folks coming from other brands where the steering isn't neutral, find that the BMW is a little disconcerting.

Your avatar is a aircraft panel. You a pilot? When you set up a bank in the air, when the aircraft is properly trimed, it will maintain the bank with hands off the stick, no? So it is with the K1200LT if the tires are good and matched and the suspension is correct. If you are used to "fighting" to stay at the lean angle as is the case with some bikes, then the K1200LT may seem unnerving at first. But if the KLT is properly set up, the neutral steering characteristics of the bike are part of what makes it "fly" through the curves...
 

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If you feel like you're "going to fall over", I wonder, do you feel like you are going to fall into the turn or out of the turn?
That is, do you feel like you are going to low side, or high side? - fall over into the turn. low side. I had a Honda long time ago and the bike slide out from underneath me in making a rt turn. I didn't see the oil slick on the road.

How long have you been riding the K1200LT or BMWs? Is neutral steering new to you? I have found that some folks coming from other brands where the steering isn't neutral, find that the BMW is a little disconcerting. I've been riding this LT since 2005. Had other bikes, but nothing this big. I just turned 100,006 miles on it.

I'm not a pilot, but have 40 yrs of aviation experience.

I guess I need to read up on Neutral steering.

My e-mail is [email protected]. Drop me a line and maybe we can chat over the phone. Thank you for your input on this post
 

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Julie and I took Stella for an easy ride to Flagstaff to check out the fall foliage, coming home by way of Oak Creek canyon between Flagstaff and Sedona.

On our way out of town, we found out that we woke her up a little too early, and she took a nap in the McDonald's parking lot on Carefree Hwy.:wink::rotf:

After that, though, she was raring to go, and delivered awesome rides both there and back!


I love this bike!:thumb:







Mark:bmw:
 

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...I'm trying to master cornering on this bike and do ride the rear brake and I do keep the throttle open, but still feel I'm going to fall over
Another thought: if you have been running Metz tires, consider mounting a set of Bridgestones. The "Stones" really are more "grippy" and give a confidence on the K1200LT that I didn't feel with Metz's.

I am now running the Stone rear/Metz front combo just to get a little more mileage from the front. A Stone on front would last me only 6K miles (I was putting on a new set of tires with each oil change), but there was nothing like the feel of the bike with a new set of Stones.
 
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