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Discussion Starter #1
I just changed the brake pads on my 05 LT. This is the first time I had done so since I bought it back in March. When I removed the pads I found a red material, like rubber cement, holding the pads to the brake pistons. The pads came off with out any trouble and I cleaned all the glue off. I'm guessing this was used to prevent the pads from making noise?

Anyone know what this stuff might be? :confused: I’ve never heard of anything like this being used on the pads.
 

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Anti Squeal compound. Any auto parts place will have it - usually on the counter right by the register.
 

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Wrencher Extraordinaire
2005 K1200LT
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I agree, probably put on there in an attempt to quiet the notorious LT squeal. But it really does not work on the LT.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the information. I'll have to look around the next time I'm in a parts store.
 

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jzeiler said:
I agree, probably put on there in an attempt to quiet the notorious LT squeal. But it really does not work on the LT.
Worked on my 00.

Not hard to find in the autoparts but it is usually blue color rather than red. Don't need much so you can even get the little tubes of it to do all 3 brakes.
 

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The squeal in most disc brakes is caused by vibration between the pad backing and the piston. The anti-squeal compounds cushion the contact area and that usually fixes the noise. I use anti-seize compound to accomplish the same thing. I apply a thin coating to the contact surface of the piston and reinstall the pads. This requires caution to avoid getting any compound on the pad and disc surface but when it's time to change the brakes out there's no mess to clean up. If you still have squeal with the glue-type compound installed, you might try a little anti-squeal between the pucks and piston heads. I would avoid using regular anti-squeal compound between the pucks and piston due to the potential of fouling the bore. I've not had my calipers apart but my understanding is that there are "pucks" on top of the hydraulic pistons on these bikes. Someone please correct me if that is not accurate.
 

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deanwoolsey said:
The squeal in most disc brakes is caused by vibration between the pad backing and the piston. The anti-squeal compounds cushion the contact area and that usually fixes the noise. I use anti-seize compound to accomplish the same thing. I apply a thin coating to the contact surface of the piston and reinstall the pads. This requires caution to avoid getting any compound on the pad and disc surface but when it's time to change the brakes out there's no mess to clean up. If you still have squeal with the glue-type compound installed, you might try a little anti-squeal between the pucks and piston heads. I would avoid using regular anti-squeal compound between the pucks and piston due to the potential of fouling the bore. I've not had my calipers apart but my understanding is that there are "pucks" on top of the hydraulic pistons on these bikes. Someone please correct me if that is not accurate.
+1 - I always have a tube of high temp anti-seize handy. Great stuff. :thumb: A little dab will do 'ya.
 

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+1

Been doing the same for a lot of years on disk brake pads. I got a quart of High Temp Copper anti seize years ago from my brother when he was a diesel mechanic on the PA Railroad. Talking about spreading out, man it goes a long way, and anyway it can.

I use it on my shift linkage cups also.

deanwoolsey said:
The squeal in most disc brakes is caused by vibration between the pad backing and the piston. The anti-squeal compounds cushion the contact area and that usually fixes the noise. I use anti-seize compound to accomplish the same thing. I apply a thin coating to the contact surface of the piston and reinstall the pads. This requires caution to avoid getting any compound on the pad and disc surface but when it's time to change the brakes out there's no mess to clean up. If you still have squeal with the glue-type compound installed, you might try a little anti-squeal between the pucks and piston heads. I would avoid using regular anti-squeal compound between the pucks and piston due to the potential of fouling the bore. I've not had my calipers apart but my understanding is that there are "pucks" on top of the hydraulic pistons on these bikes. Someone please correct me if that is not accurate.
 
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