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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Folks: I'm going to pull the wheels to change tires this weekend, and while I have the front off I'm going to replace the brake pads for the first time. Anything special I should look out for? I presume it's just a matter of drop the old ones out, slide the new ones in, spread 'em and mount. The pads will self-center, right?

The discs are smooth with no outer ridge so that doesn't seem to be much of a concern.

Thanks.

JayJay
 

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Just a couple thoughts.

Clean the pistons before you push them into the caliper to avoid pushing dirt past the seals.

Be careful pushing the pistons in, do it equally and slowly. With the caliper off there is the potential for a piston to move out as you push another in and can move enough to pop it past the seal.

Watch the level in the master cylinder, if the fluid was topped off with worn pads the res will be over filled when the pistons are pushed in the caliper.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
New2rt said:
Just a couple thoughts.

Clean the pistons before you push them into the caliper to avoid pushing dirt past the seals.

Be careful pushing the pistons in, do it equally and slowly. With the caliper off there is the potential for a piston to move out as you push another in and can move enough to pop it past the seal.

Watch the level in the master cylinder, if the fluid was topped off with worn pads the res will be over filled when the pistons are pushed in the caliper.
Good general thoughts, thanks. I'm a reasonably experienced general wrench and not reluctant to try things, and I've worked on disc brake assemblies on cars off and on for years. Just was wondering if there was something unique and quirky about the bike's.

JayJay
 

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Change your brake fluid while you are in there.

Brake fluid is designed to absorb water, which is a catch 22. It stops water from being in the lines (and boiling) which is good, but is also means that your brake fluid absorbs water, so change it regularly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
OU812 said:
Are you using the same pad material?
If not beware the grabby. ;)
I've been satisfied with the OEM pad performance so I was just going to pick up a set of pads at the dealer. When I change pads I scrub the pad and the rotor with acetone before installation to get rid of any fluid or crap that's found it's way onto the friction surfaces. On other vehicles I've had to buff the rotors with steel wool or fine sandpaper to get rid of glaze but I don't see any on these rotors. I also don't feel any ridges or grooves, which is good because I understand these rotors can't be resurfaced. If I can get another 40K miles out of this set of pads it might be worth replacing rotors then just as a prevention. Rears may have gone by then, also.

I do a brake fluid flush every two years.

JayJay
 

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When I went with the EBC sintered I had to rotor hone the rotors as I had transferred the original pad material to the rotors sitting with the brake on to keep from rolling.
Lessen learned.:)
 

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mwood7800 said:
watch the inside rear pad, it wears way motr than the outer
I think the inner pad is thinner when new. I do wonder why sometimes.
I think it's because there are some holes that if you can see disc through the pad, it's time to change, the other side has a bit more to obscure the view.
\v/
 
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