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Make sure you cover the handlebars and stingray with plastic and cover with an old towel or similar. The plastic protects the paint from the nasty brake fluid, and the fabric absorbs any spills and stops them from running.

Once you have the handlebar reservoir open, drop a 1x1-ish piece of plastic in there to cover the bottom hole and block the geyser effect as you pump the clutch lever to flush. I use a piece cut from an empty plastic oil bottle. I also bend a tab in one end to make it easier to grab when done.

I removed the grub and replaced it with a speed bleeder. Now, I simply hook up a tube to an empty IV bag and keep topping off the upper reservoir as I pump the new fluid in and the old fluid out. When the fluid going into the bag is clean, I pump a few more times for good measure, top off the reservoir to the proper place, and button everything up. With the speed bleeder, it is a simple one-man task that takes under 15 minutes, much of which is spent prepping and protecting the bike.

There are others who do not feel the need for a SpeedBleeder, and they are just as right as those of us who see benefit in installing one. Whatever works best for you is what you should do.
 

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Dep: I've heard of the Speed Bleeders before, and really haven't paid much attention to them. I just took a look at the website. Assuming that they do even most of what's claimed, the question is: Why isn't everyone using them?? In your experience, do they have any downside? I mean, for $7 (or $15 for stainless) they seem like a no-brainer.
 

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There a few methods to bleed brakes, speedbleeders are just one. If you have a helper, loosen tighten..use a IV bag, use suction. etc
 

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Wrencher Extraordinaire
2005 K1200LT
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I love the speed bleeder bag and hose deal for $6.00. If you attach the hose and elevate the bag there is no way an air bubble can go down the hose. I just open the bleeder nipple and pump away. When the fluid goes clean I stop and close the nipple, lower the bag and remove the hose. It is a one man operation.
 

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Dragonwing said:
Dep: I've heard of the Speed Bleeders before, and really haven't paid much attention to them. I just took a look at the website. Assuming that they do even most of what's claimed, the question is: Why isn't everyone using them?? In your experience, do they have any downside? I mean, for $7 (or $15 for stainless) they seem like a no-brainer.
No downside as far as I can see. I use them on caliper and clutch bleed, but not on the ABS pump. I like 'em because I can do the bleed solo with the speed bleeders.

More than one way to skin a cat, though. This has become MY personal favorite, though.
 

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I guess that there might be one teensy downside. From a post a few years ago:

"Speedbleeders won't work at all if you get a lot of air in the lines so they are most certainly not useful or desirable in that case. The reason they won't work is that air in the line compresses without opening the check valve in the Speedbleeder. If you get a lot of air in the lines on something that has Speedbleeders, you will have to essentially remove them to get fluid down to the bleeder, then put them back on and bleed."

OK. I get the theory. But, I suppose that, if you have that much air in the lines, you have a lot more to worry about than a simple brake bleed.....
 

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When you bleed clutch or front brake, after moving handlebar either full right or left, do you loosen reservoir to level position and finish topping off? Is there another way as to not spill and get correct fluid level?

Thanks
 

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I've never loosened the reservoir to get it level. I just turn the handlebar fully right or fully left and fill the reservoir as high as it will go without spilling. Others may have a different opinion, but this procedure seems to work for me.

I've done a number of clutch bleeds without a speed bleeder, and I can verify that it is an absolute mess. I've yet to find a normal bleeder that fits in place of the grub screw, so every time I have to resort to pushing on the spring-loaded ball with a screwdriver to release pressure. The result is brake fluid everywhere. Sounds like the speed bleeder really cleans up this task, will have to get one!
 

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Wrencher Extraordinaire
2005 K1200LT
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And the manual says.... I have done it both ways and even if you do rotate the reservoir like the manual says it is still not exactly level. Pick your poison.
 
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