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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all,

I've been silently spectating this forum as I search for my next bike. Tomorrow I'll be headed out to see a 2014 with 4900 miles. Should I be concerned that the miles are too low? It's at a dealership and photos and description all look good. The bike has new tires, is fully loaded with all packages, has the factory GPS and the top box. The dealership also offers a 30 day warranty, although I'm not sure how thorough that is.

Any words of advice or caution as I check it out and take it for a test ride?
 

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It is extremely low mileage. I wouldn't worry about it. It is surprising how many people buy motorcycles and never ride them. If you buy it, ride the hell out of it for those 30 days and shake out any problems. I would pay particular attention to performance at high speed. I bought a 2017 RT last year with less than 6k miles. It has been a good bike, but I had a high speed miss at @93 mph. It took me about 6 months to figure out that it had a bad fuel pump. But I was very unhappy with the bike until I solved the problem.
Get that 30-day warranty in writing :rolleyes: Also make sure that the rev limiter has been opened up.
 

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Just for "fun", toss the VIN into this VIN reader. Free BMW VIN Decoder : ///M Decoder

It'll closely mirror the original equipment sticker (i.e. is it really a "premium", or does it just have one or two of the four or five packages). Second, ask the service department to run their report (Warranty Vehicle Inquiry). It'll include production date, date originally put into service, any warranty services executed, repair history, as well as the same package list that the VIN decoder should have.

If you search and review back to the introduction of the 2014's, it was a problematic introduction. In fact, if I recall correctly, it was so bad that BMW either had a generalized recall, or instituted a buyback program. I'd be concerned that this was a "lemon" purchased by BMW, which sat in a warehouse somewhere for 3 - 4 years until the legal and/or mechanical issues were resolved. (Or, it could have been involved in a wreck, or some major service that sidelined it for 9 months waiting for parts.) All of this is worst case stuff, but you have a bike you're looking at that has an exceptional mileage record, combined with the history of the 2014's.

Find out if the rocker arms have been upgraded have been upgraded to the new version (2015+), and the cam lobes checked. Look at the difference between old and new parts in that bulletin, and review the bmwmoa thread for details on failures encountered. ALL 2014's and some early 2015's were equipped with these parts, which were determined to be faulty due to metallurgy issues.

(You might want to go back and read the entire thread from the beginning.)

I'd certainly be interested in that bike, if I hadn't already bought a 2018. But I wouldn't accept any salesman's assurance at face value. This bike could have only been ridden on Sundays by an 84 year old grandfather, and could still be a heap of problems for you, if you don't know the facts.
 

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If you search and review back to the introduction of the 2014's, it was a problematic introduction. In fact, if I recall correctly, it was so bad that BMW either had a generalized recall, or instituted a buyback program. I'd be concerned that this was a "lemon" purchased by BMW, which sat in a warehouse somewhere for 3 - 4 years until the legal and/or mechanical issues were resolved. (Or, it could have been involved in a wreck, or some major service that sidelined it for 9 months waiting for parts.) All of this is worst case stuff, but you have a bike you're looking at that has an exceptional mileage record, combined with the history of the 2014's.
I bought a 2014 new and only a couple months into ownership BMW issued a "stop ride" recall notice. The rear shock supposedly was apt to fail with abusive riding (think offroad wheelies). It was idle for several months while BMW figured out what to do - I eventually took the buy back and discount on a K1600GT. The dealer took a while to collect the RT and it was the next year before it had been repaired with the replacement shock, so it was out of commission for over a year. This was at a high volume dealership, so I imagine a low volume shop could have taken much longer. So a 2014 may have low mileage due to the recall and slow turn around time. Or that owners soured on the whole mess and the bikes just sat. It was a sad experience for me because the RT was a great bike and though I like the '22 RT I currently ride, the '14 felt lighter and more nimble.
 

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The original poster (@dcdbraun) hasn't been back since his first post. It'll be interesting to hear his review of his test ride.

Again, I wouldn't run away from a 2014 with low miles, at the right price. Even if it was a "buy back", if repaired, it could be as good as any other RT on the road, and particularly, those "Wetheads" with normal (higher) mileage. He just needs full disclosure on the vehicle ownership history and maintenance history.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I'm back, and I'm riding on the new bike! The dealership did provide a 30-day warranty and the bike rode excellent on test ride and on the 75 mile return trip. I paid $12,295 and it now has 4200 miles on it sitting in my garage. It's fully loaded, has new tires, engine guards, and the factory top box. It's tipped over at least once as there are scuff marks on one engine guard and small scuffs on the front. Overall, it feels like a lot of bike for the money and I'm excited to put the miles on it. I will dig deeper into the issues listed above and decide how to best investigate it within the 30 day window. Thanks for all the advice, I'm excited to be part of the community!

Tire Fuel tank Wheel Automotive lighting Vehicle

White Automotive tire Automotive lighting Automotive exterior Bumper

Automotive lighting Automotive tire Hood Motor vehicle Automotive design
 

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Congrats! All used bikes worth their weight will have a few, honest "war wounds". 😁 Don't even bother trying to touch 'em up, or fix 'em. Takes too much time away from riding. 🤣

That's one BEAUTIFUL bike you're riding.

Now begins the official farkling period. (Definition: "Farkles": All the little add-on's that Beemer riders where invest all the money they have left after buying their original bike. It's only the stuff they really "need", though. 🙃😁)

This site and bmwst.com are filled with ideas which you'll probably find attractive. For example, Heed (Poland) makes some nice rear crash bars, which I highly recommend. If it doesn't have already have a BMW NAV6 GPS, look into the Zumo XT with the (Italian made) E-Nav XT RT bracket, which enables it to snap right into BMW's OEM cradle. (The Garmin Zumo is an arguably better unit than the Garman-made, overpriced NAV6.) Tank bags are popular. After market seats are almost a must, for a lot of riders. That top box is a $1500 add on, unless they slapped an earlier model's box on their (i.e. the "Wethead" boxes come with an electronic connector, and integrated locking with the rest of the BMW automatic lock system). Windshields are another worth while add on (i.e. BMW has improved theirs, but most want a little "quieter" wind experience with a bit better protection).

Most of all, (and I don't know what your experience is, so forgive me if my advice feels overbearing), ride "ATGATT". That's "all the gear, all the time." Quality helmet, jacket, lowers (pants), boots, gloves, can all save you a trip to the hospital and long rehabs. Keep your head on a swivel, cause YES, they (the cages/autos/trucks) really ARE all out to get you. 😏 The only motorcycle riders are those who have fallen (or wrecked), and those who are about to. Be prepared for what you can't avoid.

Have fun, stay safe, and God bless!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
It did indeed come with the BMW GPS unit, controllable from the wheel. And the top box works with the central luck system, which seems really nice. After coming from Harley, I’m looking forward to no farkles. I’m am looking into playing with a vinyl wrap on the bike though. A fun color change I can do myself, with a little practice.
 

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Congrats the wethead RTs are such a wonderful balanced ride, a true Sport Tourer of the highest order, bar none. Lightest in class yet fully capable for distance touring, canyon ripping and everything in between. I bought my '16 new, it's got 50,570mi OTC now and rides today every bit as wonderfully as it did when brand new. I treat it kindly and in return it's been the epitome of relibility. I ride w/ side cases off unless touring, and I have the smaller top box that stays on the bike for minor errands/shopping. That's a fabulous price for a nearly new machine!
 
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Congrats on your purchase of an awesome bike. I may be a little biased as I have the '18 model. There's some great advice above, I'll only add that if you plan on doing some longer days (200+ miles) an aftermarket seat may be in order. I say that because there are some that the stock seat does work for, but I fear they're few and far between. I replaced my stock seat with Sargent seats 2 years ago and they doubled the time I could comfortably be in the saddle. Recently switch over to the Russell Day Long seats and they made a world of difference when doing 300+ mile days.

Let us know how it goes if you decide to the do the vinyl wrap. Seen some really nice wrap jobs and it may be in my future too.
 
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