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I hear a lot of complaint on final drive failure. I spoke to a friend that came from cuba last year he's a motorcycle mechanic for the state run motorcycle rental on the island. he says BMW bikes are all over the island, he explain the drive assembly runs very hot. so it breaks down the viscosity of the fluid very quickly because it hard to get part in cuba what they do is everytime the bikes come in they change the drive fluid. they been doing this with 99% success rate. he recomments that if I ride the bike change the rear end every 1000miles. I guess this is cheaper than a drive failure and spending thousands of dollar on repair just my dime worth of info
 

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I doubt that there are very many LT's in Cuba.
Change oil every tank of gas if you want to. It ain't gonna make any difference.

my 2 cents
 

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It's your money, your time, and your final drive. Change it as often as YOU want!!! Won't help, but if it makes you happy...
 

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My bum (and most of the bike) is 'sprung weight' - they are all protected from the impressive shocks delivered when the bike travels over rough surfaces by the suspension.

Wheels (and the final drive) are 'unsprung weight' and are protected from shocks solely by the flexibility of the tyre walls.

If you rode on solid tyres, then the vibration and shock loading transmitted to the unsprung parts would be extremely high.

In Europe, most riders follow the BMW tyre pressure settings. (36/42). Final drive failures are comparatively rare.

In the US, many riders increase the tyre inflation pressure (46/48?) - and hence increase the shock load on the final drive.

In the US, final drive failures are all too common.

Has anybody done a study to determine how (or if) the failure rate correlates with tyre pressure?
 

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Manuel_de_Vol said:
.......In the US, many riders increase the tyre inflation pressure (46/48?) - and hence increase the shock load on the final drive.

In the US, final drive failures are all too common.

Has anybody done a study to determine how (or if) the failure rate correlates with tyre pressure?
Yes, the data is pretty good on this. Just research the archives on this site and you'll find many posts which clearly illuminate the primary cause of FD failures, i.e. over weight Americans riding on over inflated tyres. This cause of final drive failures is only second to those caused by high temps in Cuba where riders aren't changing their final drive lube every 1000 miles. Other theories regarding KLT final drive failures are lacking in substantive data.

Addendum: Sarcasm and facetiousness are under appreciated on the right side of the pond, and are much lost in the written word, so I append this post with an addn'l couple of ;) ;)
 

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I also heard that coconut oil works well too.. Just kidding...
I had my tires inflated to the BMW specs.. Also the oil changed earlier than specified.
Didn't make a difference.
Maybe we ride longer distances? Mine had 14k when it bit the bearing, so maybe this doesn't have any bearing..
Ride it, enjoy it, if your paranoid, get another final drive just in case.

Charlie VT was kind enough to do the autopsy.

I still need to lose 40 lbs :D
Until the fatherland releases their data of final drive failure I believe it is a non event.. Never happened.
right :histerica
 

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heh, heh.... :thumb:
 

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CharlieVT said:
Yes, the data is pretty good on this. Just research the archives on this site and you'll find many posts which clearly illuminate the primary cause of FD failures, i.e. over weight Americans riding on over inflated tyres. This cause of final drive failures is only second to those caused by high temps in Cuba where riders aren't changing their final drive lube every 1000 miles. Other theories regarding KLT final drive failures are lacking in substantive data.

Addendum: Sarcasm and facetiousness are under appreciated on the right side of the pond, and are much lost in the written word, so I append this post with an addn'l couple of ;) ;)
Given that the overweight Americans are sprung weight (hard on the springs, perhaps ;)) but the wheels (and the FD) are unsprung weight, I don't think the blame can be (justifiably) allocated to avoirdupois. :lol8:

My K1200 is extremely comfortable on long journeys, handles well through the bends (easier to corner than my R1100) but it's not as reliable.

It's a beach in the wet. I can't see through the bloody screen (it it's up to protect me from the spray) and if it's down, I can't see because of all the water which flows off the top onto my visor.

'Wheel shimmy' (or even tank slap) is impressive in the wet.

I will take my K1200 back to the US this summer and sell it. - If I don't do so earlier.

My 'Mofa' - The R1100RT - is another kettle of fish. Reliable, works in the wet as well as it in the dry and the handling is predictable.

Not as comfortable as the K12 and it burns a bit of oil. 1cc per mile
 
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