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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, yesterday I was filling my bike (2013 Camhead RT) up with fresh fuel in preparation for winter layup, and the nozzle at the pump was pretty awkward - I was on the off-side with the bike on the centre-stand. I usually fill it on the side-stand, from the left. The pump nozzle has a small hole in the side, about 1/4" from the tip. Some fuel (not very much, really) went down the outside of the bike's actual filling tube. Where does this end up? Nothing seemed to dribble down anywhere, and I rode about 80 kms, not noticing any fuel smell. Is there some 2-part top on the tank that directs spillage back into the tank? Or is there some vent hose that I haven't noticed?
Thanks, Alan L. in BC
 

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I don't have a 2013 RT but I've had a bit of experience with fuel spills on a few different RTs.
If you open the filler cap and look at the filler cap surround you will see some holes. Those holes drain small spills into a vent hose that empties onto the ground under the bike. The diameter of the holes means they can only help you out with small fuel spills. On the very rare occasion when I haven't been paying attention and have continued pumping, the fuel has washed over the tank and on to a hot motor - not recommended!
It's worth checking those drain holes every now and then to make sure they are not blocked by crud.
I live in a climate where we ride all year round, so no winter lay up. Others might chime in to advise on the use of a fuel stabiliser.

Ian
 

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I don't have a 2013 RT but I've had a bit of experience with fuel spills on a few different RTs.
If you open the filler cap and look at the filler cap surround you will see some holes. Those holes drain small spills into a vent hose that empties onto the ground under the bike. The diameter of the holes means they can only help you out with small fuel spills. On the very rare occasion when I haven't been paying attention and have continued pumping, the fuel has washed over the tank and on to a hot motor - not recommended!
It's worth checking those drain holes every now and then to make sure they are not blocked by crud.
I live in a climate where we ride all year round, so no winter lay up. Others might chime in to advise on the use of a fuel stabiliser.

Ian
As a first-year RT-er, the question about fuel stabilizer is top of my mind as well.
With my 21-year old Lexus LS (which I store all winter), I haven't used stabilizer; I just start the car up monthly and let it run for 10-15 minutes to warm up. Maybe I'm just lucky, but I've never had an issue using this routine. It may help that I'm using premium fuel...
Would a similar regimen work with my RT - which is also fed a diet of premium fuel?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the info. I get my fuel from our local cardlock (when buying locally) and the owner of the facility is a friend. He says that his fuel is good for at least one year. He has an F650 and a bit of a collection of Vespas and Lambrettas. I have read some info about stabilizers - some apparently do more harm than good. I haven't used any stabilizer for the last couple of years, and never would use the cheap stuff from Canadian Tire, etc.
I think that starting up over the storage season is not a good idea - best to take a good last ride to thoroughly warm the bike up, fill up on fuel, park it and disconnect the battery.

Thanks again, cheers.
 

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Hello, yesterday I was filling my bike (2013 Camhead RT) up with fresh fuel in preparation for winter layup, and the nozzle at the pump was pretty awkward - I was on the off-side with the bike on the centre-stand. I usually fill it on the side-stand, from the left. The pump nozzle has a small hole in the side, about 1/4" from the tip. Some fuel (not very much, really) went down the outside of the bike's actual filling tube. Where does this end up? Nothing seemed to dribble down anywhere, and I rode about 80 kms, not noticing any fuel smell. Is there some 2-part top on the tank that directs spillage back into the tank? Or is there some vent hose that I haven't noticed?
Thanks, Alan L. in BC
As always, things got stray well off the subject without even trying to answer the question!!! :)

The over-spill gets directed to the carbon canister to prevent contamination!
 

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"
I haven't used stabilizer; I just start the car up monthly and let it run for 10-15 minutes to warm up. Maybe I'm just lucky, but I've never had an issue using this routine. It may help that I'm using premium fuel...
Would a similar regimen work with my RT - which is also fed a diet of premium fuel? "

Don't start your bike up in the winter at all unless you can go for a 15 minute ride. Short rides just introduce concensate to the engine and its oil. Not good as it helps form corrosive chemicals in there. Keep tabs on your battery via a smart charger. If you can do the last fill up for the winter with non ethanol gas this is great. Otherwise a product "Startron" seems to work well. Idling a motorcycle which depends on an air flow is dangerous and not productive below is an R bike idling for ten minutes. Note the pipes are red hot.
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As always, things got stray well off the subject without even trying to answer the question!!! :)

The over-spill gets directed to the carbon canister to prevent contamination!
AHA!!
Learned something new here.
Thank you.
RBGary
 

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AHA!!
Learned something new here.
Thank you.
RBGary
That was so on my prior hexhead '07 RT, and I believe it's the same for your camhead. OTOH, my wethead '14 and '15 RT has a drain tube from the fill over-spill directly to a point just behind the rider's left foot-peg! Your question makes me think that perhaps the wethead and newer models don't have carbon canister? BTW, when I said "contamination" I really meant to say "pollution". That's what the carbon canister is for.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
That was so on my prior hexhead '07 RT, and I believe it's the same for your camhead. OTOH, my wethead '14 and '15 RT has a drain tube from the fill over-spill directly to a point just behind the rider's left foot-peg! Your question makes me think that perhaps the wethead and newer models don't have carbon canister? BTW, when I said "contamination" I really meant to say "pollution". That's what the carbon canister is for.
Thanks - at least I now know that any stray fuel won't just dribble onto the engine. I cannot answer any questions about the later, post-camhead bikes - still learning about this one!
Cheers, Alan
 

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As a first-year RT-er, the question about fuel stabilizer is top of my mind as well.
With my 21-year old Lexus LS (which I store all winter), I haven't used stabilizer; I just start the car up monthly and let it run for 10-15 minutes to warm up. Maybe I'm just lucky, but I've never had an issue using this routine. It may help that I'm using premium fuel...
Would a similar regimen work with my RT - which is also fed a diet of premium fuel?
For winter storage, I fill mine with pure gas (no ethanol) an connect the battery on the tender. I put it on the center stand and keep both wheels off the ground.
The bike sits in my non heated garage from December to March.
No issue starting it in the spring.
 

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I put it on the center stand and keep both wheels off the ground.
How do you do that??

When I put my bike on the centre stand it is front heavy and the front wheel is always touching the ground.

Sorry, ignore that question. Giving it more thought it's probably because I don't leave the panniers on the bike if I'm not needing them. That would obviously change the balance point :)
 

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How do you do that??

When I put my bike on the center stand it is front heavy and the front wheel is always touching the ground.

Sorry, ignore that question. Giving it more thought it's probably because I don't leave the panniers on the bike if I'm not needing them. That would obviously change the balance point :)
Even without the panniers the front wheel will be on the ground.
I forgot to mention that I use a frontlifter to raise the front wheel. Sorry

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Don't know about the others, but when my '13 camhead is on the centre-stand there is very little weight on the front end.
Bike is stored in a carport with concrete floor.
 
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