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Ok, I have done my searches but still don't have a good handle on what most feel is the best for attire when riding in the cold weather (teens and single digits). I have an Olympia jacket and pants with liners. I also have a Gerbings heated jacket liner and BMW winter riding boots.

I rode home last night with it all on and felt line a knight in armor! I put the pants over regular jeans just for ease of getting home after work, as it was 3 A.M., but I won't do that again. Way to bulky. So, what are all of you using to stay warm? 1) The new Gerbings outer wear? 2) Jacket and pants with just the Gerbings liners and cotton long underwear?
3) Some new combination I don't know about?

I would love to hear some opinion on this so I can ride all winter without feeling so uncomfortable. My feet and hands are fine, it's just the bulk I would like to cut down on.

Thanks and a Merry Christmas to all!
 

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I have a solution, Gene, but it's probably not what you're looking for. It has 4WD and a heater! :)

- Bob
 

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I have an Aerostich Roadcrafter one-piece suit, Gerbings jacket liner, Gerbings gloves, Triumph leather motorcycle boots with SmartWool hiking socks. With just a pair of flannel-lined jeans, a t-shirt and long-sleeve button-up shirt, I am perfectly warm & toasty down into single digits at highway speeds for up to an hour (haven't tried longer or colder). The Gerbings jacket liner is relatively thin and I don't feel bulky at all. The Gerbings gloves are a little bulky - I would perhaps like to find a thinner heated glove - but still very comfortable and not so bulky to be awkward. I don't need any heated gear from the waist down, including the feet. One thing I've learned is to size motorcycle boots a tad on the large side so as not to compress the foot inside the boot. A tight fitting boot squeezes the blood out and makes cold feet fast. One might think the thicker the sock the better, but this is not the case if things get tight in your boot. Another miracle-worker for feet is to wear a super-thin polypropylene sock liner, which helps to wick the moisture away from the skin and keep the feet warm.
 

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Four pieces on Gerbing's liners. Jacket, gloves, pants, socks. Dual-troller . . . controls waist up and waist down. I simply can't get cold. Wear whatever your want to over-top, won't matter.
 

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Hey Gene
When I've had long trips like back and forth to MO during the colder months I've found a couple of things that make interstate speeds tolerable. I use layers, avoid denim, and keep my neck warm. I've found the the "winter wear" that UnderArmor distributes works well next to the skin both on top and bottom. Next to that I put my Gerbings jacket and overlay everything with my Kilamanjaro 3/4 length jacket and overpants. When it gets closer to freezing or below I add a fleece jacket over the Gerbings to get it closer to the skin and I add some fleece pants to my legs. The fleece is light, allows good movement and is not too bulky when fitted well. I also have a couple of different balacavas that I wear. One is very light material that will fit under my helmet and down on my neck and the other is, you guessed it, fleece and provides good bulk from my helmet to the shoulders.

My Cruiserworks boots with medium heavy socks (don't cut off circulation) and BMW winter gloves with all the above can keep me warm enough for 12 to 13 hours on the bike during the winter months with no more than my usual gas stops.
 

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Gerbing outer wear for the pants and the Jacket/liner for the torso
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks

Thanks for all the advice! I think the trick might be a pair of Gerbings overpants, which will keep the bulk on the lower end down. I have a pair of leather and kevlar gloves, so those plus the heated grips are fine for the hands. The feet are good, so I think after Christmas it's off to Gerbings for me.

As for the advice on using a car/truck with a heater, ah no thanks unless it's snowing. I have a Mini Cooper S, which I bought in June and it still only has 2000 miles on it. We've had such a nice fall that I've put 8000 miles on the bike instead.
 

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All good things must come to an end...

zippy_gg said:
A&S is having a sale on the Gerbing jacket liner $129.00 instead of the $199.00 retail.

http://www.ascycles.com/detail.aspx?ID=43292
Hot Deal Update!
While the response for the previously advertised Heated Jacket Liner was overwhelming, we've been instructed by the manufacturer that we are not allowed to sell any more at that price. We sincerely apologize for not being able to offer that jacket liner anymore, however, to make it up, we are replacing it with a heated garment that's as close as we could get for an even better deal.
 

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We always wear rain gear as an outer layer when it gets very cold. A trick I learned in the Army riding in open vehicles.
 

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I'm too late in replying to offer any advice you haven't already heard, except for this: wear something to keep wind from going down your neck. Everyone has their individual differences regarding cold weather tolerance; the key for me staying warm is to block that wind down the back of the jacket collar.

A balaclava (tons of different styles out there), one of those wind-blocking triangle thangs, or just a fleece headband worn around the neck is all it takes.

I've seen Gerbing's new product line but I'd like to see some personal reviews of it on this site. Seems to combine the best of all worlds (except summer-weight gear) with its built-in heating system.
 

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Maybe Im too late. But when I worked outside in Chicago I wore a product called CAPILENE. Its light and works great to keep you warm and dry. In comes in different weights. The heavy weight I used is no thicker than a light sweatshirt and I rode down to 10 a few times and kept fairly warm. Then over with Aerostich and Kanematsu heated vest. The Capilene you can get from a company called PATAGONIA. They have been is buisness a long time and make clothing for mountain climbers and such. Its about 80/90$ a set. You wont be disappointed.

Zeke
 

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emsweeney said:
Ok, I have done my searches but still don't have a good handle on what most feel is the best for attire when riding in the cold weather (teens and single digits). I have an Olympia jacket and pants with liners. I also have a Gerbings heated jacket liner and BMW winter riding boots.
I'm assuming that you have a pretty good handle on your commute times and don't get caught with unanticipated weather changes.. hence the desire to ride in weather that could have frozen road surfaces.

I use electric liner, quality (high neck form fitting) jacket, and an additional unheated neck warmer to keep the back of neck near the helmet warm. That combo allows my back, neck and shoulders to stay relaxed. I find that helps the cold more than any one thing.

The heated seat and insulated First Gear overpants, over my work pants, keep the cold at bay for my legs at reasonable speeds. If I rode colder I would also invest in some of those new phase change gloves that would distribute the grip warmth a little better on my hands. I find the tips of my index and middle fingers don't get an equal distribution of heat below 35 degrees, which I find for me, is the about where ratio of enjoyment and pain meet so... I am not worried about stopping every hour of so to warm my feet. If I had to run colder than freezing I would need some sort of electric foot heater.

I personally think that the temps, after dark road obstacles would take out much of the enjoyment. Of course everyone is different.. :thumb:
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I agree

As many have stated the cold air coming into and around the neck area seems to be the worst. On really cold days I use the Gerbings liner which goes up pretty high. On medium cold days I'll use what they call a skiing 'gator" around my neck, which is funny because I ski often in the west and have never used it, but it works great around my neck when riding, (guess I'll have to ski faster)!

100% water proof rain pants might be an interesting idea over the 'Dragon" jeans. They would offer wind protection with less bulk and much less cost.

I'm going to pursue that idea, thanks!

On another note I was wondering how A&S was offering the Gerbings at such a low cost, as I had often heard they were sticklers about their fair-trade agreements.
 

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emsweeney said:
100% water proof rain pants might be an interesting idea over the 'Dragon" jeans. They would offer wind protection with less bulk and much less cost.

I'm going to pursue that idea, thanks!
On the note of 100% waterproof.. I would suggest First Gear HT overpants. They are 100% 'rain/storm' waterproof, have some CE approved armour for knees and hips, have a zip in 'winter' liner and best of all have entire side zippers on each leg that allow you to commute with dress pants or jeans and dress in the parking lot. I can be in or out of the overpants in under one minute.
 

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Depends on how cold, I'll wear a Irish fishermans sweater
(not some box store BS,) the real deal 4 ply yarn, made oversize, as the get wet and shrink they form fit to your body and are almost wind and water proff by them selves.
If it is below 20, then I put on a goose down vest with that collar up, out of jacket of course.
Irish Setter 1600 gram Knee boots, Timberland pro Bibs,
mid weight gloves with bar end mitts.
Rock
 
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