BMW Luxury Touring Community banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Enjoy The Ride
Joined
·
3,963 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I thought I would share a few tips of how I install the FD & align the drive shaft U-Joints.

The first thing I do is to rotate the drive shaft so the front U-Joint is in the 12,3,6 &9 o-clock position. I then put it in 1st gear & mark the shaft at the 3 o-clock position. Then I install the rear U-Joint aligned with the front U-Joint & mark every thing with a paint stick. I also mark the rear U-Joint cap at the 3 o-clock position.

Now I install the rear U-Joint & spline into the FD & rotate the marked cap to the 3 -clock position & lock it in place with a c-clamp & a spacer or washers between the brake rotor & the rear brake caliper bolt hole.

I now can install the FD & keep everything in alignment . Look for the painted U-Joint cap thru the right pivot pin hole. After the pivot pins are in place & the rear reaction bolt is installed I remove the c-clamp & rotate the rotor to make sure the drive shaft is engaged to the FD. If the rotor rotates the FD is not engaged into the drive shaft.

Now follow the torque specification's to finish the FD install.
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,886 Posts
I wish I had seen this before I put the FD on without actually mating the FD to the shaft! Would have saved me a couple hours of work.

What is the zip tie for in the top right photo (FD 002.jpg)?

Does the paint stay on so that the marks are usable for subsequent installations if necessary?

No doubt this will be of great benefit to the next person, though, and that is a good thing.
 

·
Premium Member
2011 R1200RT
Joined
·
8,157 Posts
IIRC the zip tie is to keep the conical needle bearing from falling apart while assembling other parts.
When I swapped my FD I just used some grease and was very careful not to drop the bearing and I guess I got lucky.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,325 Posts
zippy_gg said:
IIRC the zip tie is to keep the conical needle bearing from falling apart while assembling other parts.
That's it exactly. While I've never actually rebuilt a FD, I have been in Dave's garage, getting in the way, when he was working on a couple! :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
437 Posts
Thank for the excellent information !
I have a spare FD for my 05 LT that I have not needed so far. But if I do I will have this information to use. I will print it out and keep it with my spare.

willie
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
288 Posts
When I installed my rebuilt final drive I just put it together and did no alignment. Should I worry, take it apart and alignment it or just ride it? I may not be the only one that did no alignment.

Jim
ND
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,338 Posts
kb0lxx said:
When I installed my rebuilt final drive I just put it together and did no alignment. Should I worry, take it apart and alignment it or just ride it? I may not be the only one that did no alignment.

Jim
ND
The alignment process is called "phasing" for keeping adverse harmonic vibrations of the driveline from developing and causing premature failure of the needle bearings in the U-joints. I would remove yours and follow Dave's excellent procedure to insure yours last a long time.

Happy riding!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,338 Posts
Nice job explaining a difficult procedure (for anyone doing it for the first time using a manual that doesn't explain how or why it's supposed to be done this way). Something else to mention is to make sure the front U-joint seats its snap-ring properly so the driveline stays in place. More than once a driveline has walked off the transmission output shaft and done some significant damage.

Thanks Dave!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
77 Posts
David.. a YEOMAN effort!! Thank you soooo much for the text and Pix's. The pictures tell a 1000 words. I now feel confident I can install the FD you repaired so nicely, correctly, without hesitation, and without worry afterwards that it will come flying apart.
Best wishes & good health,
Larry Edelman

"YEOMAN: performed or rendered in a loyal, valiant, useful, or workmanlike manner, especially in situations that involve a great deal of effort or labor: He did a yeoman job on the problem."
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top