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The Beemerboneyard fuel line replacement kit appears to be a good deal, but I’m concerned about the five-foot length of line that comes in the kit. I took the original hoses off my LT yesterday,including the short hoses coming off the fuel tank. I measured the total length to be about 69 inches. Wondering if any of the list members has used the B.B. kit and found the length to be enough to do the job?
Thanks,
 

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The Beemerboneyard fuel line replacement kit appears to be a good deal, but I’m concerned about the five-foot length of line that comes in the kit. I took the original hoses off my LT yesterday,including the short hoses coming off the fuel tank. I measured the total length to be about 69 inches. Wondering if any of the list members has used the B.B. kit and found the length to be enough to do the job?
Thanks,
A friend having a K1200RS like mine tried the BBY hose and said that 5 foot was not enough - as you have measured, you need a bit more. The K1200RS and K1200LT have similar distance from fuel rail to the other side of the tank (although these fuel-tanks have minor variations in shape between the 2 bikes).

In my opinion, if your intend to go with a NON BMW original part that does not have the 90 bend already preformed at fuel-rail points, then your best bet is a good auto parts strore to buy 6 feet to 7 feet of external fuel hose certified J30R9 of internal diameter 5/16 (or 8 mm). Keep in mind you can create an important pressure restriction if your bend is not smooth coming out of the fuel rail - this is the reason the OEM hose is preformed.

"J30R9" is a common automotive SAE certification for for high-pressure applications like fuel injection and oil. These are designed to stand up to the environment under the hood - basically same as external fuel hose for modern fuel injected motorcycle. This 30R9 marking should be visible on the hose - these are mainly manufactures by either GATES or GOODYEAR.

P.S.: Although the 90 deg bend at the fuel rail can be worked around , I do not think it is possible to work around the 180 bend coming out of the fuel tank (2 short sections of hoses) with a straight hose. In this case you need something pre-formed in my opinion.
 
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A friend having a K1200RS like mine tried the BBY hose and said that 5 foot was not enough - as you have measured, you need a bit more. The K1200RS and K1200LT have the distance from fuel rail to the other side of the tank (although fuel-tank has minor variations in shape between the 2 bikes).

In my opinion, if your intend to go with a NON BMW original part that does not have the 90 bend already preformed at fuel-rail points, then your best bet is a good auto parts strore to buy 6 feet to 7 feet of external fuel hose certified J30R9 of internal diameter 5/16 (or 8 mm). Keep in mind you can create an important pressure restriction if your bend is not smooth coming out of the fuel rail - this is the reason the OEM hose is preformed.

"J30R9" is a common automotive SAE certification for for high-pressure applications like fuel injection and oil. These are designed to stand up to the environment under the hood - basically same as external fuel hose for modern fuel injected motorcycle. This 30R9 marking should be visible on the hose - these are mainly manufactures by either GATES or GOODYEAR.

P.S.: Although the 90 deg bend at the fuel rail can be worked around , I do not think it is possible to work around the 180 bend coming out of the fuel tank (2 short sections of hoses) with a straight hose. In this case you need something pre-formed in my opinion.

I am curious to get to my fuel line installation and see now it goes with the Gates bulk hose. I may well be buying the formed BMW hose if things don’t look good. I am really not much worried about slow restriction or pressure loss. I doubt that an LT can use even .25 GPM at full throttle and redline (that would empty the tank in less than 30 minutes). Looking at the following charts, the LT is pretty much off the scale on both flow velocity in the lines and pressure drop. Unless I am reading this paper incorrectly, I think the hose would have to be truly kinked closed to have a real impact at the flow rates of an LT. The 5/16” line looks oversized for this size engine.

https://www.parker.com/literature/Hose Products Division/Catalog 4400 PDF Files/Section_E_Technical.pdf
 
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I am curious to get to my fuel line installation and see now it goes with the Gates bulk hose. I may well be buying the formed BMW hose if things don’t look good. I am really not much worried about slow restriction or pressure loss. I doubt that an LT can use even .25 GPM at full throttle and redline (that would empty the tank in less than 30 minutes). Looking at the following charts, the LT is pretty much off the scale on both flow velocity in the lines and pressure drop. Unless I am reading this paper incorrectly, I think the hose would have to be truly kinked closed to have a real impact at the flow rates of an LT. The 5/16” line looks oversized for this size engine.

https://www.parker.com/literature/Hose Products Division/Catalog 4400 PDF Files/Section_E_Technical.pdf
Agree that even at full throttle, these BMW motorcycles FI pump system can deliver at least 3 times more fuel than needed. I cannot find it right now in my accumulated data / specs, but I had some data for an R1150RT boxer based on 94 HP output engine .

HOWEVER, my concern is not so much a small restriction in the bend (like 30 to 60%), but a restriction that could become more like a total collapse / kink that would restrict fuel up to only tiny drip. This could happen over time, many days / weeks after the initial install because of accumulated vibrations + heat (or even fairing movement during maintenance).
 

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sailor P.S.: Although the 90 deg bend at the fuel rail can be worked around said:
One of the old timers on this site, I think it was J Zeiler, spoke of inserting a stainless spring into the fuel line at the bend. I haven't tried it so I'm not sure if it's worth the time involved.
 

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I wish I had seen this post a few days ago. I just ordered the external fuel line kit from Beemer Boneyard. Looks like I may need to buy some extra hose.
 

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I am curious to get to my fuel line installation and see now it goes with the Gates bulk hose. I may well be buying the formed BMW hose if things don’t look good. I am really not much worried about slow restriction or pressure loss. I doubt that an LT can use even .25 GPM at full throttle and redline (that would empty the tank in less than 30 minutes). Looking at the following charts, the LT is pretty much off the scale on both flow velocity in the lines and pressure drop. Unless I am reading this paper incorrectly, I think the hose would have to be truly kinked closed to have a real impact at the flow rates of an LT. The 5/16” line looks oversized for this size engine.

https://www.parker.com/literature/Hose Products Division/Catalog 4400 PDF Files/Section_E_Technical.pdf
WHAT?? You haven't done that yet??? Ten feet gives you about three feet left over after new lines going to the left side of the motor and new QDs on the tank side. Also gives you plenty to make a stub for the fuel pump filter. Wait, I think I mentioned this on another thread...I need coffee :crazy:
 

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WHAT?? You haven't done that yet??? Ten feet gives you about three feet left over after new lines going to the left side of the motor and new QDs on the tank side. Also gives you plenty to make a stub for the fuel pump filter. Wait, I think I mentioned this on another thread...I need coffee :crazy:
You are clearly new to the LT. This is how it goes:

1. You start a maintenance cycle on the LT, but always find that repairs are needed also.

2. You start at the bottom and work your way up as you didn’t have time to wash your LT before winter suddenly set in so it isn’t a clean as you would like. And dirt falls down, just like crap rolls downhill, so you want to work bottom up so you aren’t dropping dirt onto places you have yet to work on.

3. You start a with the centerstand as it is not allowing clearance for the rear oil filter cover screw and you are tired of loosening the centerstand every time you change the filter. And you need the bike on the centerstand to rotate the rear tire to roll the engine over for the valve check.

4. You do the valves next as you likely will have to order parts, but you hope all is in spec still after 50,000 miles.

5. You find two valves out of spec and a few others on the borderline. So you order buckets which of course are not in stock and have to be special ordered.

6. While waiting on the buckets you decide to grease the FD pivot bushings (I had the RCRG JL bushings) as you heard some squeaking at the end of the last riding season.

7. You find the bushings are dry and worn beyond use and have spun their inner races on the aluminum pins ruining both.

8. You order new pins. They are not in stock and are special order. You also order new bearings from EME trying to save a few bucks over the $210 BMW bearings.

9. You get the buckets, bearings and pins. So you are good to go!

10. Not so fast sunshine, you find that the bearings are crap and have to remove them and send them back.

11. You think, no problem, I will just do the valves while I am waiting on the $210 gold plated BMW bearings. At least the bearings are in stock. One might think BMW sells a lot of these...

12. You start through the manual and pull the plugs so you can more easily rotate the engine into position for cam removal.

13. You then go to grab the rear wheel to roll the engine over and see the FD still laying on the lift.

So, what was that discussion about fuel lines? :histerica
 

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You are clearly new to the LT. This is how it goes:

1. You start a maintenance cycle on the LT, but always find that repairs are needed also.

2. You start at the bottom and work your way up as you didn’t have time to wash your LT before winter suddenly set in so it isn’t a clean as you would like. And dirt falls down, just like crap rolls downhill, so you want to work bottom up so you aren’t dropping dirt onto places you have yet to work on.

3. You start a with the centerstand as it is not allowing clearance for the rear oil filter cover screw and you are tired of loosening the centerstand every time you change the filter. And you need the bike on the centerstand to rotate the rear tire to roll the engine over for the valve check.

4. You do the valves next as you likely will have to order parts, but you hope all is in spec still after 50,000 miles.

5. You find two valves out of spec and a few others on the borderline. So you order buckets which of course are not in stock and have to be special ordered.

6. While waiting on the buckets you decide to grease the FD pivot bushings (I had the RCRG JL bushings) as you heard some squeaking at the end of the last riding season.

7. You find the bushings are dry and worn beyond use and have spun their inner races on the aluminum pins ruining both.

8. You order new pins. They are not in stock and are special order. You also order new bearings from EME trying to save a few bucks over the $210 BMW bearings.

9. You get the buckets, bearings and pins. So you are good to go!

10. Not so fast sunshine, you find that the bearings are crap and have to remove them and send them back.

11. You think, no problem, I will just do the valves while I am waiting on the $210 gold plated BMW bearings. At least the bearings are in stock. One might think BMW sells a lot of these...

12. You start through the manual and pull the plugs so you can more easily rotate the engine into position for cam removal.

13. You then go to grab the rear wheel to roll the engine over and see the FD still laying on the lift.

So, what was that discussion about fuel lines? :histerica

HAHAHAAAA! I grok, just funnin ya, I knew you had some heavy metal stuff going on :). I had a hard time reading that whole list because I AINT DOING ONE THING MORE until I get this back together and ride it for a few days, lol. I take that back, going to get rid of the alarm as soon as my wife is done using a space heater in her practice room because if I turn on the garage heater it pops the breaker and we all know who has dibs on being warm, lol. Those are some serious maintenance items, man. I am reasonably sure my FD is in decent shape given the diagnosis on the oil they drained from it, plus it doesn't get really hot after a 20 mile turnpike run in 70's temps. i checked the rear wheel for any movement and nary a wobble so I am going to leave the deep state stuff until later this year. With your impending trip to AK I definitely see why you are doing this, though.
 

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HAHAHAAAA! I grok, just funnin ya, I knew you had some heavy metal stuff going on :). I had a hard time reading that whole list because I AINT DOING ONE THING MORE until I get this back together and ride it for a few days, lol. I take that back, going to get rid of the alarm as soon as my wife is done using a space heater in her practice room because if I turn on the garage heater it pops the breaker and we all know who has dibs on being warm, lol. Those are some serious maintenance items, man. I am reasonably sure my FD is in decent shape given the diagnosis on the oil they drained from it, plus it doesn't get really hot after a 20 mile turnpike run in 70's temps. i checked the rear wheel for any movement and nary a wobble so I am going to leave the deep state stuff until later this year. With your impending trip to AK I definitely see why you are doing this, though.
Quite honestly, I only took the FD off as I suspected there was trouble. The rear end felt a little stiff on small bumps and I was hearing a troubling squeaking sound as I mounted and dismounted the bike. I figured it was either the bronze bushings or the rear shock and the shock has only 20,000 miles on it whereas the bushings had 50,000 so I suspected them most highly. Unfortunately, I was right and I am glad I took it apart. I suspect that 10,000 more miles on rough Alaska roads might well have worn through the aluminum pins or possible snapped one off given the rotation torque being applied by the frozen bushings. That would make for a very short, but exciting ride.
 
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