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Discussion Starter #1
I was doing my valves on my 2005. Had the bike in neutral, sprockets tied up, 90 degrees from TDC, #1 intake lobes pointing down - exhaust out. Took off the intake sprocket with no problem. Went to take off the exhaust. Came off with no problem, but as I was taking it off it seemed to jump on me slightly. Went from straight out to slightly pointing up. Went ahead and took out the cams and buckets. I am now asking if I need to do or check anything before the rebuild. Thanks.
 

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It was in tension. Next time put a wrench on the cam and pull down to put slack
in the chain. the sprocket will come off easier.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I was doing my valves on my 2005. Had the bike in neutral, sprockets tied up, 90 degrees from TDC, #1 intake lobes pointing down - exhaust out. Took off the intake sprocket with no problem. Went to take off the exhaust. Came off with no problem, but as I was taking it off it seemed to jump on me slightly. Went from straight out to slightly pointing up. Went ahead and took out the cams and buckets. I am now asking if I need to do or check anything before the rebuild. Thanks.
 

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Unfortunatly I was going by the Clymer manual and Kirks video. But at the time I was doing it I was reading the Clymer which didn't specify holding the cam. Sorry Kirk, I should have just kept watching your video instead of going back and fourth. Anyhow, I didn't have any trouble taking the sprocket off. It wiggled right off. So do I proceed as normal. Or must I now check for any timing issues?
 

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I was doing my valves on my 2005. Had the bike in neutral, sprockets tied up, 90 degrees from TDC, #1 intake lobes pointing down - exhaust out. Took off the intake sprocket with no problem. Went to take off the exhaust. Came off with no problem, but as I was taking it off it seemed to jump on me slightly. Went from straight out to slightly pointing up. Went ahead and took out the cams and buckets. I am now asking if I need to do or check anything before the rebuild. Thanks.
As long as the cam sprockets are secured to the cam chain with zip ties, you have no problem.

The cam shafts will "jump" a little sometimes due to valve spring pressure when the cam sprocket is removed as the valve springs seek their most "relaxed" position against the cam shaft lobes.

The cam shaft sprockets are keyed to the camshaft so when you to go to reinstall the sprockets on the camshaft ends, there is only one way for things to line up. You will use a 19mm spanner on the flat spots on the cam shafts to rotate the camshafts to get the shafts to line up properly with the key on the sprockets.

Only if you loose the relationship of the cam sprocket teeth with the cam chain will you have to reset the cam chain timing.

HTH
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks again Curtis. Twice in one day. I'm going to have to look you up on my way to Americade this year so I can shake your hand.
 

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Re: Editing posts

Thanks again Curtis. Twice in one day. I'm going to have to look you up on my way to Americade this year so I can shake your hand.
If you accidently make duplicate posts (easy to do), you can delete one by clicking on the "edit" button at the bottom of the post.
(I'm always editing my posts) :histerica

After a few hours the edit option will disappear so there is a limited window of opportunity to revise or delete...
 

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So, while we are on the subject of cam timing, is the cam chain guided around the crankshaft sprocket such that it cannot slip a tooth while it is slack ?
 

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So, while we are on the subject of cam timing, is the cam chain guided around the crankshaft sprocket such that it cannot slip a tooth while it is slack ?
It would be very difficult to get the cam chain to jump a tooth on the crankshaft sprocket without removing the cam chain guides.

During normal valve adjustment procedures with the cam shaft sprockets zip-tied to the cam chain, and the cam chain guides in place, it would be next to impossible for the chain to jump a tooth on the crankshaft sprocket.

Addendum: I just went out and took my bike all apart just so I could take a picture. ;)

Actually, I just happened to be at the stage of reassembling the cam chain mechanism. So a couple of pics.



 

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Thanks for the info Curtis. Very kind of you to dismantle the engine at such short notice. But seeing you are so efficient in executing these tasks, I am on vacation in New Zealand at present so maybe you could slip down to Tassie and mow my lawns;)
 
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Thanks for the info Curtis. Very kind of you to dismantle the engine at such short notice. But seeing you are so efficient in executing these tasks, I am on vacation in New Zealand at present so maybe you could slip down to Tassie and mow my lawns;)
I wondered why you weren't home. That 'splains it, you're in New Zeland.
I finished your lawn a couple of hours ago.
Helped myself to a few Boag’s Premiums, didn't think you'd mind. Thanks. :thumb:

Cheers!
 
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