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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok- I'll ask: wtf is this? (On my right front caliper)
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It's some sort of barrel fitting where (I think) a brake bleeder should be. There was a little Allen head cap threaded into it... Removing that didn't do anything. It has 2 flats on it (13mm) which are now positioned so as to be useless.

My guess is - it's a fitting for a bridge pipe; since it will accept a banjo bolt.

I can't get it to budge- and I have lot's of air in this side... So I am kind of stuck with no brakes.

Figured I would try you guys before I: pull the caliper off, remove the break line, brute force this thing off (on the bench) , replace with a bleeder. (that I don't have)
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 · (Edited)
Well... Here it is:
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It's a little worse for wear- having been extracted with the help of a little pipe wrench.

I have another bike - similar age - with Brembo calipers; down for repairs and due for a flush. It donated a bleeder to the cause.
 

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I think BMW calls it a grub screw. It is used at the factory for their pressure fill equipment. Replace it with a bleed screw and you should be good to go. Just make sure you get the correct metric size.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I think BMW calls it a grub screw. It is used at the factory for their pressure fill equipment. Replace it with a bleed screw and you should be good to go. Just make sure you get the correct metric size.
Thanks. Leaves me wondering if I am bleeding this 20 year old caliper for the first time since it left the factory.
 

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The whole thing is called a fill adapter and was used on the early bikes to fill the brake fluid in the front circuit. You can remove the grub screw and insert a standard M10 vent screw for the bleed or flush then remove the vent screw an replace the grub screw. There is a check valve in the adapter. Or just remove it like you did (heat is helpful) and replace it with the above mentioned M10 vent screw permanently.

I am sure this is not the first time (at least I hope so).
 
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Thanks. Leaves me wondering if I am bleeding this 20 year old caliper for the first time since it left the factory.
I’d say 50/50 that you are. If you have trouble pushing the pistons back into the calipers or, worse yet, they stick and don’t want to come back out, then you will have even more clues.
 
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