BMW Luxury Touring Community banner

1 - 20 of 35 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Since there are a lot of riders on here with a lot of miles under their belt, I want to ask- When coming to a routine stop (stop sign, traffic light, etc.), do you downshift or disengage the clutch and coast to a stop? Why?
Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
552 Posts
I don't shift and let the engine help me slow down. This also allows me to be in a lower gear if I need to give it gas for some reason. I would guess that holding the clutch in will burn the plate out quicker.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
635 Posts
I downshift so I have power available to me for evasive maneuvers. Whilst at a stop light, I am in 1st gear with clutch in, again so I am prepared for the enexpected.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,745 Posts
I don't do much town riding, but OMG, I live in BFE,...........that said,.... approaching a stop, I generally pull in the clutch, and shift down through the pattern, with out letting the clutch out.......I only am using the engine decompression when I feel like I really need it..........(coming down long mountain passes, etc)...........remember that the LT has a dry clutch....But, I do like to be in the proper gear to get out of a situation as quick if not quicker than I got into it.........some times you need to be able to escape a bad situation at an intersection...........Using the decompression to slow down is probably a good thing, but in BFE, clutch replacement is sort of on the 'major hasel'........List........If you keep the K engine in revs, (I like 4000 or so), your in the pwr and also able to slow down if you have to.......j..
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,108 Posts
I downshift without engine braking unless it's a quick stop and then it's just pull the clutch in and shift it down after I'm stopped.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,106 Posts
I down shift and use engine breaking, then hold the clutch in while at the stop for all the same reasons listed in the above posts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
161 Posts
It depends on the situation. If I am out in the middle of nowhere I will just pull the clutch and shift down with speed. If I am in an area with traffic and red lights I might downshift. It is hard to say one way or the other for me, it is just what the situation calls for.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,595 Posts
gunny said:
Down shift, use compression braking and use the brakes, all the same time, all the time.
Same here, have done with all bike and cars.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,677 Posts
BeeTee said:
Since there are a lot of riders on here with a lot of miles under their belt, I want to ask- When coming to a routine stop (stop sign, traffic light, etc.), do you downshift or disengage the clutch and coast to a stop? Why?
Thanks.
I downshift. For a few reasons:

1. It helps to slow down with less wear on the brakes.
2. Should I see someone coming up fast behind me, I am in a gear that will allow decent acceleration should the need arise.
3. Most motorcycles are "return shift" and thus you have to go through all of the gears to get to neutral or first anyway and it isn't always easy to downshif 4 times while stopped.

You will often hear the "brakes are a lot cheaper than clutches" used as an excuse to not use engine braking while slowing. While this is a true statement, in 36 years of driving everything from motorcycles to 18 wheelers, I have NEVER worn out a single clutch. My current pickup is a 94 Chevy with 130,000 miles and 17 winters of plowing snow and its clutch works like new. I ran a Jeep Comanche to 150K on the original clutch. Likewise, ran two VW Beetles past 100K and a Chevette to 115K and never wore out a clutch and I always use engine braking.

I have, however, worn out MANY sets of brake shoes and pads, so while a clutch costs more than brakes, if clutches never wear out the argument does not hold. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Voyager said:
I downshift. For a few reasons:

1. It helps to slow down with less wear on the brakes.
2. Should I see someone coming up fast behind me, I am in a gear that will allow decent acceleration should the need arise.
3. Most motorcycles are "return shift" and thus you have to go through all of the gears to get to neutral or first anyway and it isn't always easy to downshif 4 times while stopped.

You will often hear the "brakes are a lot cheaper than clutches" used as an excuse to not use engine braking while slowing. While this is a true statement, in 36 years of driving everything from motorcycles to 18 wheelers, I have NEVER worn out a single clutch. My current pickup is a 94 Chevy with 130,000 miles and 17 winters of plowing snow and its clutch works like new. I ran a Jeep Comanche to 150K on the original clutch. Likewise, ran two VW Beetles past 100K and a Chevette to 115K and never wore out a clutch and I always use engine braking.

I have, however, worn out MANY sets of brake shoes and pads, so while a clutch costs more than brakes, if clutches never wear out the argument does not hold. :)
Gotta go with this. I've always used engine braking to my advantage, assuming the stop was planned. It seems to make for less frenzied decelerations, and always communicates 'seasoned' to those around. Even though I've only been riding for a couple weeks, I've had decent stoplight convos because i haven't looked like a hard-braking newbie. I would say, use the clutch and gears as you can, unless you need the stopping power.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,746 Posts
I agree completely with using engine braking to assist the hydraulic brakes. Dropping down a gear or 2 as appropriate will drastically decrease the stopping distance.

Loren
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
323 Posts
I always use engine breaking for planned stops to supplement the breaks, in fact this technique is on the Indiana MC Operators test. There are times when Engine breaking could be a hindrance to an emergency stop though I found this article that explains how breaking works, it's really concentrating on the breaks themselves in relation to tires and load so doesn't mention engine breaking except in passing, but it appears to highlight the instances where engine breaking would want to be avoided.

http://www.lazymotorbike.eu/tips/braking/

-Preston
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,677 Posts
palarimer said:
I always use engine breaking for planned stops to supplement the breaks, in fact this technique is on the Indiana MC Operators test. There are times when Engine breaking could be a hindrance to an emergency stop though I found this article that explains how breaking works, it's really concentrating on the breaks themselves in relation to tires and load so doesn't mention engine breaking except in passing, but it appears to highlight the instances where engine breaking would want to be avoided.

http://www.lazymotorbike.eu/tips/braking/

-Preston
Why do you want to break your engine? I prefer to keep my engine unbroken! :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
290 Posts
I downshift through all of the gears, always. Those who don't likely always hog the left lane, too. :rotf:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
150 Posts
Down shifting and using your engine as a brake is the most effective means of stopping any manual shift vehicle. Some of the early motorcycles actually specified this technique in the owners manual since using the brakes only would not stop you. :mad: Whether you use this technique or not you do need to ensure you are in first gear before you stop. This is taught by MSF. The reason is two fold; if you are in first when you stop and the clutch is disengaged you are ready to take off in the event you need to make an evasive maneuver. Secondly it is easier to down shift your transmission while the output shaft of the transmission is still spinning.
 
1 - 20 of 35 Posts
Top